G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002121
Gene symbol
DLGAP4 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
discs, large (Drosophila) homolog-associated protein 4
Orthologue
G00000872 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000032390 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000080845 (Ensembl human gene)
22839 (Entrez Gene)
475 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DLGAP4 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:24476 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9Y2H0 (UniProt)

Synonyms (3)

  • DAP4
  • KIAA0964
  • SAPAP4

Literature (18)

Pubmed - other

  • Identification of new putative susceptibility genes for several psychiatric disorders by association analysis of regulatory and non-synonymous SNPs of 306 genes involved in neurotransmission and neurodevelopment.

    Gratacòs M, Costas J, de Cid R, Bayés M, González JR, Baca-García E, de Diego Y, Fernández-Aranda F, Fernández-Piqueras J, Guitart M, Martín-Santos R, Martorell L, Menchón JM, Roca M, Sáiz-Ruiz J, Sanjuán J, Torrens M, Urretavizcaya M, Valero J, Vilella E, Estivill X, Carracedo A and Psychiatric Genetics Network Group

    CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.

    A fundamental difficulty in human genetics research is the identification of the spectrum of genetic variants that contribute to the susceptibility to common/complex disorders. We tested here the hypothesis that functional genetic variants may confer susceptibility to several related common disorders. We analyzed five main psychiatric diagnostic categories (substance-abuse, anxiety, eating, psychotic, and mood disorders) and two different control groups, representing a total of 3,214 samples, for 748 promoter and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 306 genes involved in neurotransmission and/or neurodevelopment. We identified strong associations to individual disorders, such as growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) with anxiety disorders, prolactin regulatory element (PREB) with eating disorders, ionotropic kainate glutamate receptor 5 (GRIK5) with bipolar disorder and several SNPs associated to several disorders, that may represent individual and related disease susceptibility factors. Remarkably, a functional SNP, rs945032, located in the promoter region of the bradykinin receptor B2 gene (BDKRB2) was associated to three disorders (panic disorder, substance abuse, and bipolar disorder), and two additional BDKRB2 SNPs to obsessive-compulsive disorder and major depression, providing evidence for common variants of susceptibility to several related psychiatric disorders. The association of BDKRB2 (odd ratios between 1.65 and 3.06) to several psychiatric disorders supports the view that a common genetic variant could confer susceptibility to clinically related phenotypes, and defines a new functional hint in the pathophysiology of psychiatric diseases.

    American journal of medical genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric genetics : the official publication of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics 2009;150B;6;808-16

  • Systematic identification of SH3 domain-mediated human protein-protein interactions by peptide array target screening.

    Wu C, Ma MH, Brown KR, Geisler M, Li L, Tzeng E, Jia CY, Jurisica I and Li SS

    Department of Biochemistry and the Siebens-Drake Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Systematic identification of direct protein-protein interactions is often hampered by difficulties in expressing and purifying the corresponding full-length proteins. By taking advantage of the modular nature of many regulatory proteins, we attempted to simplify protein-protein interactions to the corresponding domain-ligand recognition and employed peptide arrays to identify such binding events. A group of 12 Src homology (SH) 3 domains from eight human proteins (Swiss-Prot ID: SRC, PLCG1, P85A, NCK1, GRB2, FYN, CRK) were used to screen a peptide target array composed of 1536 potential ligands, which led to the identification of 921 binary interactions between these proteins and 284 targets. To assess the efficiency of the peptide array target screening (PATS) method in identifying authentic protein-protein interactions, we examined a set of interactions mediated by the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain by coimmunoprecipitation and/or affinity pull-downs using full-length proteins and achieved a 75% success rate. Furthermore, we characterized a novel interaction between PLCgamma1 and hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1) identified by PATS and demonstrated that the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain negatively regulated HPK1 kinase activity. Compared to protein interactions listed in the online predicted human interaction protein database (OPHID), the majority of interactions identified by PATS are novel, suggesting that, when extended to the large number of peptide interaction domains encoded by the human genome, PATS should aid in the mapping of the human interactome.

    Proteomics 2007;7;11;1775-85

  • Identification of VCP/p97, carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), and amphiphysin II interaction partners using membrane-based human proteome arrays.

    Grelle G, Kostka S, Otto A, Kersten B, Genser KF, Müller EC, Wälter S, Böddrich A, Stelzl U, Hänig C, Volkmer-Engert R, Landgraf C, Alberti S, Höhfeld J, Strödicke M and Wanker EE

    Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin, Robert-Rössle-Strasse 10, D-13125 Berlin-Buch, Germany.

    Proteins mediate their biological function through interactions with other proteins. Therefore, the systematic identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions have become a powerful proteomic strategy to understand protein function and comprehensive cellular regulatory networks. For the screening of valosin-containing protein, carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), and amphiphysin II interaction partners, we utilized a membrane-based array technology that allows the identification of human protein-protein interactions with crude bacterial cell extracts. Many novel interaction pairs such as valosin-containing protein/autocrine motility factor receptor, CHIP/caytaxin, or amphiphysin II/DLP4 were identified and subsequently confirmed by pull-down, two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, assays were performed to validate the interactions functionally. CHIP e.g. was found to efficiently polyubiquitinate caytaxin in vitro, suggesting that it might influence caytaxin degradation in vivo. Using peptide arrays, we also identified the binding motifs in the proteins DLP4, XRCC4, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, which are crucial for the association with the Src homology 3 domain of amphiphysin II. Together these studies indicate that our human proteome array technology permits the identification of protein-protein interactions that are functionally involved in neurodegenerative disease processes, the degradation of protein substrates, and the transport of membrane vesicles.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2006;5;2;234-44

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T, Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome.

    Stelzl U, Worm U, Lalowski M, Haenig C, Brembeck FH, Goehler H, Stroedicke M, Zenkner M, Schoenherr A, Koeppen S, Timm J, Mintzlaff S, Abraham C, Bock N, Kietzmann S, Goedde A, Toksöz E, Droege A, Krobitsch S, Korn B, Birchmeier W, Lehrach H and Wanker EE

    Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, 13092 Berlin-Buch, Germany.

    Protein-protein interaction maps provide a valuable framework for a better understanding of the functional organization of the proteome. To detect interacting pairs of human proteins systematically, a protein matrix of 4456 baits and 5632 preys was screened by automated yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction mating. We identified 3186 mostly novel interactions among 1705 proteins, resulting in a large, highly connected network. Independent pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated the overall quality of the Y2H interactions. Using topological and GO criteria, a scoring system was developed to define 911 high-confidence interactions among 401 proteins. Furthermore, the network was searched for interactions linking uncharacterized gene products and human disease proteins to regulatory cellular pathways. Two novel Axin-1 interactions were validated experimentally, characterizing ANP32A and CRMP1 as modulators of Wnt signaling. Systematic human protein interaction screens can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of protein function and cellular processes.

    Cell 2005;122;6;957-68

  • Transcriptome characterization elucidates signaling networks that control human ES cell growth and differentiation.

    Brandenberger R, Wei H, Zhang S, Lei S, Murage J, Fisk GJ, Li Y, Xu C, Fang R, Guegler K, Rao MS, Mandalam R, Lebkowski J and Stanton LW

    Geron Corporation, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. rbrandenberger@geron.com

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells hold promise for generating an unlimited supply of cells for replacement therapies. To characterize hES cells at the molecular level, we obtained 148,453 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from undifferentiated hES cells and three differentiated derivative subpopulations. Over 32,000 different transcripts expressed in hES cells were identified, of which more than 16,000 do not match closely any gene in the UniGene public database. Queries to this EST database revealed 532 significantly upregulated and 140 significantly downregulated genes in undifferentiated hES cells. These data highlight changes in the transcriptional network that occur when hES cells differentiate. Among the differentially regulated genes are several components of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators that likely play key roles in hES cell growth and differentiation. The genomic data presented here may facilitate the derivation of clinically useful cell types from hES cells.

    Nature biotechnology 2004;22;6;707-16

  • PSD-95 promotes CaMKII-catalyzed serine phosphorylation of the synaptic RAS-GTPase activating protein SynGAP after transient brain ischemia in rat hippocampus.

    Song B, Yan XB and Zhang GY

    Research Center of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Xuzhou Medical College, 84 West Huai-hai Road, Xuzhou 221002, Jiangsu, PR China.

    Recent studies have indicated that cerebral ischemia induces rapid serine phosphorylation of synaptic RAS-GTPase activating protein (SynGAP) by calcium/Camodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in rat hippocampus. To further illustrate the mechanisms underlying these processes, we examined the effects of transient (15 min) brain ischemia followed by reperfusion (0, 30 min, 6 h, 1, 3 days) on serine phosphorylation of SynGAP and interactions involving SynGAP, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) and CaMKII in rat hippocampus. Transient brain ischemia was induced by the method of four-vessel occlusion in Sprague-Dawley rats. Serine phosphorylation of SynGAP increased immediately after brain ischemia and peaked at 30-min reperfusion, and the increase was maintained for 3 days. The association among SynGAP, PSD95 and CaMKII had a similar trend as serine phosphorylation of SynGAP. Intracrebroventricular infusion of PSD95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide not only markedly decreased the protein levels of PSD95 but also attenuated the elevated serine phosphorylation of SynGAP and the associations among SynGAP, PSD95 and CaMKII induced by 30-min reperfusion following 15-min brain ischemia. The results suggest that the serine phosphorylation of SynGAP catalyzed by CaMKII is immediately increased and that PSD95 is critical for promoting SynGAP serine phosphorylation after transient brain ischemia.

    Brain research 2004;1005;1-2;44-50

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Exocyst complex subunit sec8 binds to postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95): a novel interaction regulated by cypin (cytosolic PSD-95 interactor).

    Riefler GM, Balasingam G, Lucas KG, Wang S, Hsu SC and Firestein BL

    Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Nelson Biological Laboratories, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA.

    The PDZ domains of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein-95 play a role in the localization of PSD-95 and binding partners to neuronal synapses. The identification of binding partners to these PDZ domains can help us in understanding how signalling complexes are assembled. We observed that one of the subunits in the sec6/8 or exocyst complex, sec8, contains a C-terminal consensus sequence for PDZ binding. Sec8 binds to PDZ1-2 of PSD-95, and this binding can be competed with a peptide that binds to PDZ1 and PDZ2 in the peptide-binding site. In addition, binding of sec8 is dependent on its C-terminal-binding sequence namely Thr-Thr-Val (TTV). Immunoblotting of rat tissue extracts shows that sec8 and PSD-95 are enriched in the same brain regions, and sec8 and PSD-95 have the same subcellular distribution in pheochromocytoma cells, suggesting that these proteins may interact in vivo. Immunoprecipitation studies of sec8 and PSD-95 in brain provide further evidence of a sec8 and PSD-95 interaction. Furthermore, the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor competes with sec8 for interaction with PSD-95. Taken together, our results suggest that the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor may function to regulate the ability of sec8 to bind to PSD-95.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: NS388892

    The Biochemical journal 2003;373;Pt 1;49-55

  • The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20.

    Deloukas P, Matthews LH, Ashurst J, Burton J, Gilbert JG, Jones M, Stavrides G, Almeida JP, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Barlow KF, Bates KN, Beard LM, Beare DM, Beasley OP, Bird CP, Blakey SE, Bridgeman AM, Brown AJ, Buck D, Burrill W, Butler AP, Carder C, Carter NP, Chapman JC, Clamp M, Clark G, Clark LN, Clark SY, Clee CM, Clegg S, Cobley VE, Collier RE, Connor R, Corby NR, Coulson A, Coville GJ, Deadman R, Dhami P, Dunn M, Ellington AG, Frankland JA, Fraser A, French L, Garner P, Grafham DV, Griffiths C, Griffiths MN, Gwilliam R, Hall RE, Hammond S, Harley JL, Heath PD, Ho S, Holden JL, Howden PJ, Huckle E, Hunt AR, Hunt SE, Jekosch K, Johnson CM, Johnson D, Kay MP, Kimberley AM, King A, Knights A, Laird GK, Lawlor S, Lehvaslaiho MH, Leversha M, Lloyd C, Lloyd DM, Lovell JD, Marsh VL, Martin SL, McConnachie LJ, McLay K, McMurray AA, Milne S, Mistry D, Moore MJ, Mullikin JC, Nickerson T, Oliver K, Parker A, Patel R, Pearce TA, Peck AI, Phillimore BJ, Prathalingam SR, Plumb RW, Ramsay H, Rice CM, Ross MT, Scott CE, Sehra HK, Shownkeen R, Sims S, Skuce CD, Smith ML, Soderlund C, Steward CA, Sulston JE, Swann M, Sycamore N, Taylor R, Tee L, Thomas DW, Thorpe A, Tracey A, Tromans AC, Vaudin M, Wall M, Wallis JM, Whitehead SL, Whittaker P, Willey DL, Williams L, Williams SA, Wilming L, Wray PW, Hubbard T, Durbin RM, Bentley DR, Beck S and Rogers J

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. panos@sanger.ac.uk

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes.

    Nature 2001;414;6866;865-71

  • Transient cerebral ischemia increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the synaptic RAS-GTPase activating protein, SynGAP.

    Pei L, Teves RL, Wallace MC and Gurd JW

    Center for the Neurobiology of Stress, Division of Life Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.

    Cerebral ischemia results in activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and increased tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins associated with postsynaptic densities (PSDs). The authors investigated the possible relation between these events by determining the effect of ischemia on tyrosine phosphorylation of the brain-specific, PSD-enriched, Ras-GTPase activating protein, SynGAP. Transient (15 minutes) global ischemia was produced in rats by 4-vessel occlusion and PSDs prepared from forebrains immediately after ischemia or at 20 minutes, 1 hour, or 24 hours of reperfusion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of SynGAP was elevated relative to sham-operated controls by 20 minutes of reperfusion and remained elevated for at least 24 hours. Tyrosine phosphorylation of SynGAP also increased in CA1 and CA3/DG subfields of the hippocampus. Enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of SynGAP was not accompanied by a change in PSD RasGAP activity. SynGAP bound to the SH2 domains of Src and Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent fashion, and this interaction increased after ischemia. SynGAP binds to the PDZ domains of PSD-95/SAP90 and coimmunoprecipitated with PSD-95. The coimmunoprecipitation of SynGAP with PSD-95 decreased after ischemia. The results indicate that changes in the properties and interactions of SynGAP may be involved in the neuropathology of ischemia.

    Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 2001;21;8;955-63

  • Proteomic analysis of NMDA receptor-adhesion protein signaling complexes.

    Husi H, Ward MA, Choudhary JS, Blackstock WP and Grant SG

    Centre for Genome Research, Centre for Neuroscience, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JQ, UK.

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) mediate long-lasting changes in synapse strength via downstream signaling pathways. We report proteomic characterization with mass spectrometry and immunoblotting of NMDAR multiprotein complexes (NRC) isolated from mouse brain. The NRC comprised 77 proteins organized into receptor, adaptor, signaling, cytoskeletal and novel proteins, of which 30 are implicated from binding studies and another 19 participate in NMDAR signaling. NMDAR and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes were linked to cadherins and L1 cell-adhesion molecules in complexes lacking AMPA receptors. These neurotransmitter-adhesion receptor complexes were bound to kinases, phosphatases, GTPase-activating proteins and Ras with effectors including MAPK pathway components. Several proteins were encoded by activity-dependent genes. Genetic or pharmacological interference with 15 NRC proteins impairs learning and with 22 proteins alters synaptic plasticity in rodents. Mutations in three human genes (NF1, Rsk-2, L1) are associated with learning impairments, indicating the NRC also participates in human cognition.

    Nature neuroscience 2000;3;7;661-9

  • nArgBP2, a novel neural member of ponsin/ArgBP2/vinexin family that interacts with synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95-associated protein (SAPAP).

    Kawabe H, Hata Y, Takeuchi M, Ide N, Mizoguchi A and Takai Y

    Department of Molecular Biology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine/Faculty of Medicine, Suita 565-0871, Japan.

    Postsynaptic density (PSD)-95/synapse-associated protein (SAP) 90 and synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) are synaptic membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Both the proteins interact with SAP90/PSD-95-associated protein (SAPAP) (also called guanylate kinase-associated protein/Dlg-associated protein). SAPAP is a protein highly enriched in the PSD fraction and may link PSD-95/SAP90 and S-SCAM to Triton X-100-insoluble structures. We found here a novel SAPAP-interacting protein, which was specifically expressed in neural tissue and was present in the postsynaptic density fraction in brain. This protein had a sorbin homology domain in the N terminus, a zinc finger motif in the middle region, and three src homology (SH) 3 domains in the C terminus and was homologous to the ponsin/ArgBP2/vinexin family proteins. We named this protein nArgBP2 because it was the most homologous to ArgBP2. nArgBP2 is a neural member of a growing family of SH3-containing proteins. nArgBP2 bound to the proline-rich region of SAPAP via its third SH3 domain and was coimmunoprecipitated with SAPAP from the extract of rat brain. Furthermore, nArgBP2 was colocalized with SAPAP at synapses in cerebellum. nArgBP2 bound to not only SAPAP but also vinculin and l-afadin, known to bind to ponsin and vinexin. nArgBP2 may be implicated in the protein network around SAPAP in the PSD.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1999;274;43;30914-8

  • Proline-rich synapse-associated proteins ProSAP1 and ProSAP2 interact with synaptic proteins of the SAPAP/GKAP family.

    Boeckers TM, Winter C, Smalla KH, Kreutz MR, Bockmann J, Seidenbecher C, Garner CC and Gundelfinger ED

    Department of Neurochemistry and Molecular Biology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, 39118, Germany. bockers@uni-muenster.de

    We have recently isolated a novel proline-rich synapse-associated protein-1 (ProSAP1) that is highly enriched in postsynaptic density (PSD). A closely related multidomain protein, ProSAP2, shares a highly conserved PDZ (PSD-95/discs-large/ZO-1) domain (80% identity), a ppI domain that mediates the interaction with cortactin, and a C-terminal SAM (sterile alpha-motif) domain. In addition, ProSAP2 codes for five ankyrin repeats and a SH3 (Src homology 3) domain. Transcripts for both proteins are coexpressed in many regions of rat brain, but show a distinct expression pattern in the cerebellum. Using the PDZ domains of ProSAP1 and 2 as bait in the yeast two-hybrid system, we isolated several clones of the SAPAP/GKAP (SAP90/PSD-95-associated protein/guanylate kinase-associated protein) family. The association of the proteins was verified by coimmunoprecipitation and cotransfection in HEK cells. Therefore, proteins of the ProSAP family represent a novel link between SAP90/PSD-95 bound membrane receptors and the cytoskeleton at glutamatergic synapses of the central nervous system.

    Funded by: NIA NIH HHS: AG12978-02; NICHD NIH HHS: P50 HD32901

    Biochemical and biophysical research communications 1999;264;1;247-52

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XIII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Suyama M, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    As a part of our cDNA project for deducing the coding sequence of unidentified human genes, we newly determined the sequences of 100 cDNA clones from a set of size-fractionated human brain cDNA libraries, and predicted the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0919 to KIAA1018. The sequencing of these clones revealed that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames were 4.9 kb and 2.6 kb (882 amino acid residues), respectively. A computer search of the sequences against the public databases indicated that predicted coding sequences of 87 genes contained sequences similar to known genes, 53% of which (46 genes) were categorized as proteins relating to cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility and nucleic acid management. The chromosomal locations of the genes were determined by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their mapping data were already available in the public databases. The expression profiles of all the genes among 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substania nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver were also examined by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;1;63-70

  • A synaptic Ras-GTPase activating protein (p135 SynGAP) inhibited by CaM kinase II.

    Chen HJ, Rojas-Soto M, Oguni A and Kennedy MB

    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena 91125, USA.

    Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) type glutamate receptors plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity in the brain. One of the proteins activated by the increase in Ca2+ is CaM kinase II (CaMKII). Here, we report a novel synaptic Ras-GTPase activating protein (p135 SynGAP) that is a major component of the postsynaptic density, a complex of proteins associated with synaptic NMDA receptors. p135 SynGAP is almost exclusively localized at synapses in hippocampal neurons where it binds to and closely colocalizes with the scaffold protein PSD-95 and colocalizes with NMDA receptors. The Ras-GTPase activating activity of p135 SynGAP is inhibited by phosphorylation by CaMKII located in the PSD protein complex. Inhibition of p135 SynGAP by CaMKII will stop inactivation of GTP-bound Ras and thus could result in activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway in hippocampal neurons upon activation of NMDA receptors.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: NS-17660, NS-28710

    Neuron 1998;20;5;895-904

  • SynGAP: a synaptic RasGAP that associates with the PSD-95/SAP90 protein family.

    Kim JH, Liao D, Lau LF and Huganir RL

    Department of Neuroscience, Howard Huges Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

    The PSD-95/SAP90 family of proteins has recently been implicated in the organization of synaptic structure. Here, we describe the isolation of a novel Ras-GTPase activating protein, SynGAP, that interacts with the PDZ domains of PSD-95 and SAP102 in vitro and in vivo. SynGAP is selectively expressed in brain and is highly enriched at excitatory synapses, where it is present in a large macromolecular complex with PSD-95 and the NMDA receptor. SynGAP stimulates the GTPase activity of Ras, suggesting that it negatively regulates Ras activity at excitatory synapses. Ras signaling at the postsynaptic membrane may be involved in the modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by NMDA receptors and neurotrophins. These results indicate that SynGAP may play an important role in the modulation of synaptic plasticity.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: T32NS07368

    Neuron 1998;20;4;683-91

  • SAPAPs. A family of PSD-95/SAP90-associated proteins localized at postsynaptic density.

    Takeuchi M, Hata Y, Hirao K, Toyoda A, Irie M and Takai Y

    Takai Biotimer Project, ERATO, Japan Science and Technology Corporation, c/o JCR Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., 2-2-10 Murotani, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-22, Japan.

    PSD-95/SAP90 is a member of membrane-associated guanylate kinases localized at postsynaptic density (PSD) in neuronal cells. Membrane-associated guanylate kinases are a family of signaling molecules expressed at various submembrane domains which have the PDZ (DHR) domains, the SH3 domain, and the guanylate kinase domain. PSD-95/SAP90 interacts with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors 2A/B, Shaker-type potassium channels, and brain nitric oxide synthase through the PDZ (DHR) domains and clusters these molecules at synaptic junctions. However, neither the function of the SH3 domain or the guanylate kinase domain of PSD-95/SAP90, nor the protein interacting with these domains has been identified. We have isolated here a novel protein family consisting of at least four members which specifically interact with PSD-95/SAP90 and its related proteins through the guanylate kinase domain, and named these proteins SAPAPs (SAP90/PSD-95-Associated Proteins). SAPAPs are specifically expressed in neuronal cells and enriched in the PSD fraction. SAPAPs induce the enrichment of PSD-95/SAP90 to the plasma membrane in transfected cells. Thus, SAPAPs may have a potential activity to maintain the structure of PSD by concentrating its components to the membrane area.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1997;272;18;11943-51

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000049 G2C Homo sapiens TAP-PSD-95-CORE TAP-PSD-95 pull-down core list (ortho) 120
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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