G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001835
Gene symbol
PALM (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
paralemmin
Orthologue
G00000586 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000071568 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000099864 (Ensembl human gene)
5064 (Entrez Gene)
1029 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
PALM (GeneCards)
Literature
608134 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:8594 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O75781 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • KIAA0270

Literature (13)

Pubmed - other

  • Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.

    Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, Macek B, Kumar C, Mortensen P and Mann M

    Center for Experimental BioInformatics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark.

    Cell signaling mechanisms often transmit information via posttranslational protein modifications, most importantly reversible protein phosphorylation. Here we develop and apply a general mass spectrometric technology for identification and quantitation of phosphorylation sites as a function of stimulus, time, and subcellular location. We have detected 6,600 phosphorylation sites on 2,244 proteins and have determined their temporal dynamics after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and recorded them in the Phosida database. Fourteen percent of phosphorylation sites are modulated at least 2-fold by EGF, and these were classified by their temporal profiles. Surprisingly, a majority of proteins contain multiple phosphorylation sites showing different kinetics, suggesting that they serve as platforms for integrating signals. In addition to protein kinase cascades, the targets of reversible phosphorylation include ubiquitin ligases, guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and at least 46 different transcriptional regulators. The dynamic phosphoproteome provides a missing link in a global, integrative view of cellular regulation.

    Cell 2006;127;3;635-48

  • Paralemmin interacts with D3 dopamine receptors: implications for membrane localization and cAMP signaling.

    Basile M, Lin R, Kabbani N, Karpa K, Kilimann M, Simpson I and Kester M

    Department of Pharmacology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA.

    Paralemmin is a novel lipid-anchored protein, which is highly expressed in neuronal plasma membranes. In this study, we demonstrate that paralemmin specifically interacts with the third intracellular loop of the D3 dopamine receptor. Utilizing co-immunoprecipitation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pulldown strategies, we demonstrate that paralemmin interacts exclusively with D3, but not D2 or D4 dopamine receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated co-localization of paralemmin and D3 receptor in vivo in hippocampus and cerebellum and in vitro in glial and neuronal cultures. Deletion mutational analysis indicates that amino acids 154-230 of paralemmin strongly interacted with amino acids 211-227 and 281-330 of the third intracellular loop of D3 receptor. The consequences of these interactions were investigated by co-expression in HEK293 cells. Cell surface biotinylation experiments demonstrate that paralemmin decreased D3 receptor concentration at the plasma membrane. Consistent with this observation, paralemmin expression decreased dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. However, paralemmin also decreased basal, isoproterenol and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, suggesting a more general cellular function for paralemmin. Taken together, paralemmin has been implicated as a potent modulator of cellular cAMP signaling within the brain.

    Archives of biochemistry and biophysics 2006;446;1;60-8

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T 5a8 , Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Sequence comparison of human and mouse genes reveals a homologous block structure in the promoter regions.

    Suzuki Y, Yamashita R, Shirota M, Sakakibara Y, Chiba J, Mizushima-Sugano J, Nakai K and Sugano S

    Human Genome Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan. ysuzuki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Comparative sequence analysis was carried out for the regions adjacent to experimentally validated transcriptional start sites (TSSs), using 3324 pairs of human and mouse genes. We aligned the upstream putative promoter sequences over the 1-kb proximal regions and found that the sequence conservation could not be further extended at, on average, 510 bp upstream positions of the TSSs. This discontinuous manner of the sequence conservation revealed a "block" structure in about one-third of the putative promoter regions. Consistently, we also observed that G+C content and CpG frequency were significantly different inside and outside the blocks. Within the blocks, the sequence identity was uniformly 65% regardless of their length. About 90% of the previously characterized transcription factor binding sites were located within those blocks. In 46% of the blocks, the 5' ends were bounded by interspersed repetitive elements, some of which may have nucleated the genomic rearrangements. The length of the blocks was shortest in the promoters of genes encoding transcription factors and of genes whose expression patterns are brain specific, which suggests that the evolutional diversifications in the transcriptional modulations should be the most marked in these populations of genes.

    Genome research 2004;14;9;1711-8

  • Transcriptome characterization elucidates signaling networks that control human ES cell growth and differentiation.

    Brandenberger R, Wei H, Zhang S, Lei S, Murage J, Fisk GJ, Li Y, Xu C, Fang R, Guegler K, Rao MS, Mandalam R, Lebkowski J and Stanton LW

    Geron Corporation, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. rbrandenberger@geron.com

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells hold promise for generating an unlimited supply of cells for replacement therapies. To characterize hES cells at the molecular level, we obtained 148,453 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from undifferentiated hES cells and three differentiated derivative subpopulations. Over 32,000 different transcripts expressed in hES cells were identified, of which more than 16,000 do not match closely any gene in the UniGene public database. Queries to this EST database revealed 532 significantly upregulated and 140 significantly downregulated genes in undifferentiated hES cells. These data highlight changes in the transcriptional network that occur when hES cells differentiate. Among the differentially regulated genes are several components of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators that likely play key roles in hES cell growth and differentiation. The genomic data presented here may facilitate the derivation of clinically useful cell types from hES cells.

    Nature biotechnology 2004;22;6;707-16

  • Regulation of dendritic branching and filopodia formation in hippocampal neurons by specific acylated protein motifs.

    Gauthier-Campbell C, Bredt DS, Murphy TH and El-Husseini Ael-D

    Department of Psychiatry and the Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3.

    Although neuronal axons and dendrites with their associated filopodia and spines exhibit a profound cell polarity, the mechanism by which they develop is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that specific palmitoylated protein motifs, characterized by two adjacent cysteines and nearby basic residues, are sufficient to induce filopodial extensions in heterologous cells and to increase the number of filopodia and the branching of dendrites and axons in neurons. Such motifs are present at the N-terminus of GAP-43 and the C-terminus of paralemmin, two neuronal proteins implicated in cytoskeletal organization and filopodial outgrowth. Filopodia induction is blocked by mutations of the palmitoylated sites or by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate, an agent that inhibits protein palmitoylation. Moreover, overexpression of a constitutively active form of ARF6, a GTPase that regulates membrane cycling and dendritic branching reversed the effects of the acylated protein motifs. Filopodia induction by the specific palmitoylated motifs was also reduced upon overexpression of a dominant negative form of the GTPase cdc42. These results demonstrate that select dually lipidated protein motifs trigger changes in the development and growth of neuronal processes.

    Molecular biology of the cell 2004;15;5;2205-17

  • The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19.

    Grimwood J, Gordon LA, Olsen A, Terry A, Schmutz J, Lamerdin J, Hellsten U, Goodstein D, Couronne O, Tran-Gyamfi M, Aerts A, Altherr M, Ashworth L, Bajorek E, Black S, Branscomb E, Caenepeel S, Carrano A, Caoile C, Chan YM, Christensen M, Cleland CA, Copeland A, Dalin E, Dehal P, Denys M, Detter JC, Escobar J, Flowers D, Fotopulos D, Garcia C, Georgescu AM, Glavina T, Gomez M, Gonzales E, Groza M, Hammon N, Hawkins T, Haydu L, Ho I, Huang W, Israni S, Jett J, Kadner K, Kimball H, Kobayashi A, Larionov V, Leem SH, Lopez F, Lou Y, Lowry S, Malfatti S, Martinez D, McCready P, Medina C, Morgan J, Nelson K, Nolan M, Ovcharenko I, Pitluck S, Pollard M, Popkie AP, Predki P, Quan G, Ramirez L, Rash S, Retterer J, Rodriguez A, Rogers S, Salamov A, Salazar A, She X, Smith D, Slezak T, Solovyev V, Thayer N, Tice H, Tsai M, Ustaszewska A, Vo N, Wagner M, Wheeler J, Wu K, Xie G, Yang J, Dubchak I, Furey TS, DeJong P, Dickson M, Gordon D, Eichler EE, Pennacchio LA, Richardson P, Stubbs L, Rokhsar DS, Myers RM, Rubin EM and Lucas SM

    Stanford Human Genome Center, Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, 975 California Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA. jane@shgc.stanford.edu

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G + C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

    Nature 2004;428;6982;529-35

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Paralemmin, a prenyl-palmitoyl-anchored phosphoprotein abundant in neurons and implicated in plasma membrane dynamics and cell process formation.

    Kutzleb C, Sanders G, Yamamoto R, Wang X, Lichte B, Petrasch-Parwez E and Kilimann MW

    Institut für Physiologische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.

    We report the identification and initial characterization of paralemmin, a putative new morphoregulatory protein associated with the plasma membrane. Paralemmin is highly expressed in the brain but also less abundantly in many other tissues and cell types. cDNAs from chicken, human, and mouse predict acidic proteins of 42 kD that display a pattern of sequence cassettes with high inter-species conservation separated by poorly conserved linker sequences. Prenylation and palmitoylation of a COOH-terminal cluster of three cysteine residues confers hydrophobicity and membrane association to paralemmin. Paralemmin is also phosphorylated, and its mRNA is differentially spliced in a tissue-specific and developmentally regulated manner. Differential splicing, lipidation, and phosphorylation contribute to electrophoretic heterogeneity that results in an array of multiple bands on Western blots, most notably in brain. Paralemmin is associated with the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membranes of postsynaptic specializations, axonal and dendritic processes and perikarya, and also appears to be associated with an intracellular vesicle pool. It does not line the neuronal plasmalemma continuously but in clusters and patches. Its molecular and morphological properties are reminiscent of GAP-43, CAP-23, and MARCKS, proteins implicated in plasma membrane dynamics. Overexpression in several cell lines shows that paralemmin concentrates at sites of plasma membrane activity such as filopodia and microspikes, and induces cell expansion and process formation. The lipidation motif is essential for this morphogenic activity. We propose a function for paralemmin in the control of cell shape, e.g., through an involvement in membrane flow or in membrane-cytoskeleton interaction.

    The Journal of cell biology 1998;143;3;795-813

  • Structure of the human paralemmin gene (PALM), mapping to human chromosome 19p13.3 and mouse chromosome 10, and exclusion of coding mutations in grizzled, mocha, jittery, and hesitant mice.

    Burwinkel B, Miglierini G, Jenne DE, Gilbert DJ, Copeland NG, Jenkins NA, Ring HZ, Francke U and Kilimann MW

    Institut für Physiologische Chemie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.

    Paralemmin is a newly identified protein that is associated with the plasma membrane and with intracellular membranes through a lipid anchor. It is abundant in brain, is expressed at intermediate levels in the kidney and in endocrine cells, and occurs at low levels in many other tissues. As it is a candidate for genetic disorders that affect membrane functions, we have determined the structure of the human paralemmin gene, PALM, showing that it is organized into nine exons. Moreover, we have performed chromosomal assignments of the human and mouse paralemmin genes, localizing them to regions of homology at human 19p13.3 and the central mouse chromosome 10. Finally, mutation analysis using RNA from mice homozygous for the mutant genes grizzled (gr), mocha (mh), mocha 2J (mh2J), jittery (ji) and hesitant (ji(hes)), which map to this area, excluded mutations in their Palm coding sequences.

    Genomics 1998;49;3;462-6

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. VI. The coding sequences of 80 new genes (KIAA0201-KIAA0280) deduced by analysis of cDNA clones from cell line KG-1 and brain.

    Nagase T, Seki N, Ishikawa K, Ohira M, Kawarabayasi Y, Ohara O, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Miyajima N and Nomura N

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Chiba, Japan.

    In this series of projects of sequencing human cDNA clones which correspond to relatively long and nearly full-length transcripts, we newly determined the sequences of 80 clones, and predicted the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0201 to KIAA0280. Among the sequenced clones, 68 were obtained from human immature myeloid cell line KG-1 and 12 from human brain. The average size of the clones was 5.3 kb, and that of distinct ORFs in clones was 2.8 kb, corresponding to a protein of approximately 100 kDa. Computer search against the public databases indicated that the sequences of 22 genes were unrelated to any reported genes, while the remaining 58 genes carried sequences which show some similarities to known genes. Protein motifs that matched those in the PROSITE motif database were found in 25 genes and significant transmembrane domains were identified in 30 genes. Among the known genes to which significant similarity was shown, the genes that play key roles in regulation of developmental stages, apoptosis and cell-to-cell interaction were included. Taking into account of both the search data on sequence similarity and protein motifs, at least seven genes were considered to be related to transcriptional regulation and six genes to signal transduction. When the expression profiles of the cDNA clones were examined with different human tissues, about half of the clones from brain (5 of 11) showed significant tissue-specificity, while approximately 80% of the genes from KG-1 were expressed ubiquitously.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1996;3;5;321-9, 341-54

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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