G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00000123
Gene symbol
Mpp2 (MGI)
Species
Mus musculus
Description
membrane protein, palmitoylated 2 (MAGUK p55 subfamily member 2)
Orthologue
G00001372 (Homo sapiens)

Databases (11)

Curated Gene
OTTMUSG00000002315 (Vega mouse gene)
Gene
ENSMUSG00000017314 (Ensembl mouse gene)
50997 (Entrez Gene)
142 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
Gene Expression
NM_016695 (Allen Brain Atlas)
g03012 (BGEM)
50997 (Genepaint)
mpp2 (gensat)
Literature
600723 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
MGI:1858257 (MGI)
Protein Sequence
Q9WV34 (UniProt)

Synonyms (4)

  • D11Bwg0652e
  • Dlg2
  • Dlgh2
  • Pals4

Literature (10)

Pubmed - other

  • Qualitative and quantitative analyses of protein phosphorylation in naive and stimulated mouse synaptosomal preparations.

    Munton RP, Tweedie-Cullen R, Livingstone-Zatchej M, Weinandy F, Waidelich M, Longo D, Gehrig P, Potthast F, Rutishauser D, Gerrits B, Panse C, Schlapbach R and Mansuy IM

    Brain Research Institute, Medical Faculty of the University of Zürich, Switzerland.

    Activity-dependent protein phosphorylation is a highly dynamic yet tightly regulated process essential for cellular signaling. Although recognized as critical for neuronal functions, the extent and stoichiometry of phosphorylation in brain cells remain undetermined. In this study, we resolved activity-dependent changes in phosphorylation stoichiometry at specific sites in distinct subcellular compartments of brain cells. Following highly sensitive phosphopeptide enrichment using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we isolated and identified 974 unique phosphorylation sites on 499 proteins, many of which are novel. To further explore the significance of specific phosphorylation sites, we used isobaric peptide labels and determined the absolute quantity of both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides of candidate phosphoproteins and estimated phosphorylation stoichiometry. The analyses of phosphorylation dynamics using differentially stimulated synaptic terminal preparations revealed activity-dependent changes in phosphorylation stoichiometry of target proteins. Using this method, we were able to differentiate between distinct isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) and identify a novel activity-regulated phosphorylation site on the glutamate receptor subunit GluR1. Together these data illustrate that mass spectrometry-based methods can be used to determine activity-dependent changes in phosphorylation stoichiometry on candidate phosphopeptides following large scale phosphoproteome analysis of brain tissue.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2007;6;2;283-93

  • BGEM: an in situ hybridization database of gene expression in the embryonic and adult mouse nervous system.

    Magdaleno S, Jensen P, Brumwell CL, Seal A, Lehman K, Asbury A, Cheung T, Cornelius T, Batten DM, Eden C, Norland SM, Rice DS, Dosooye N, Shakya S, Mehta P and Curran T

    Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, United States.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: 5R37NS036558, N01-NS-0-2331, R37 NS036558

    PLoS biology 2006;4;4;e86

  • Libraries enriched for alternatively spliced exons reveal splicing patterns in melanocytes and melanomas.

    Watahiki A, Waki K, Hayatsu N, Shiraki T, Kondo S, Nakamura M, Sasaki D, Arakawa T, Kawai J, Harbers M, Hayashizaki Y and Carninci P

    Genome Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako main campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 Japan.

    It is becoming increasingly clear that alternative splicing enables the complex development and homeostasis of higher organisms. To gain a better understanding of how splicing contributes to regulatory pathways, we have developed an alternative splicing library approach for the identification of alternatively spliced exons and their flanking regions by alternative splicing sequence enriched tags sequencing. Here, we have applied our approach to mouse melan-c melanocyte and B16-F10Y melanoma cell lines, in which 5,401 genes were found to be alternatively spliced. These genes include those encoding important regulatory factors such as cyclin D2, Ilk, MAPK12, MAPK14, RAB4, melastatin 1 and previously unidentified splicing events for 436 genes. Real-time PCR further identified cell line-specific exons for Tmc6, Abi1, Sorbs1, Ndel1 and Snx16. Thus, the ASL approach proved effective in identifying splicing events, which suggest that alternative splicing is important in melanoma development.

    Nature methods 2004;1;3;233-9

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Blackshaw S, Harpavat S, Trimarchi J, Cai L, Huang H, Kuo WP, Weber G, Lee K, Fraioli RE, Cho SH, Yung R, Asch E, Ohno-Machado L, Wong WH and Cepko CL

    Department of Genetics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs") were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: P20 CA096470, P20 CA96470; NEI NIH HHS: EY08064, R01 EY008064

    PLoS biology 2004;2;9;E247

  • Identification of multiple binding partners for the amino-terminal domain of synapse-associated protein 97.

    Karnak D, Lee S and Margolis B

    Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

    Multiprotein complexes mediate static and dynamic functions to establish and maintain cell polarity in both epithelial cells and neurons. Membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins are thought to be scaffolding molecules in these processes and bind multiple proteins via their obligate postsynaptic density (PSD)-95/Disc Large/Zona Occludens-1, Src homology 3, and guanylate kinase-like domains. Subsets of MAGUK proteins have additional protein-protein interaction domains. An additional domain we identified in SAP97 called the MAGUK recruitment (MRE) domain binds the LIN-2,7 amino-terminal (L27N) domain of mLIN-2/CASK, a MAGUK known to bind mLIN-7. Here we show that SAP97 binds two other mLIN-7 binding MAGUK proteins. One of these MAGUK proteins, DLG3, coimmunoprecipitates with SAP97 in lysates from rat brain and transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. This interaction requires the MRE domain of SAP97 and surprisingly, both the L27N and L27 carboxyl-terminal (L27C) domains of DLG3. We also demonstrate that SAP97 can interact with the MAGUK protein, DLG2, but not the highly related protein, PALS2. The ability of SAP97 to interact with multiple MAGUK proteins is likely to be important for the targeting of specific protein complexes in polarized cells.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: 2-P50-DK39255; NIGMS NIH HHS: 5-T32-GM07544, GM08353

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2002;277;48;46730-5

  • BAC contig from a 3-cM region of mouse chromosome 11 surrounding Brca1.

    Pershouse M, Li J, Yang C, Su H, Brundage E, Di W, Biggs PJ, Bradley A and Chinault AC

    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

    Even with the completion of a draft version of the human genome sequence only a fraction of the genes identified from this sequence have known functions. Chromosomal engineering in mouse cells, in concert with gene replacement assays to prove the functional significance of a given genomic region or gene, represents a rapid and productive means for understanding the role of a given set of genes. Both techniques rely heavily on detailed maps of chromosomal regions, initially to understand the scope of the regions being modified and finally to provide the cloned resources necessary to allow both finished sequencing and large insert complementation. This report describes the creation of a BAC clone contig on mouse chromosome 11 in a region showing conservation of synteny with sequences on human chromosome 17. We have created a detailed map of an approximately 3-cM region containing at least 33 genes through the use of multiple BAC mapping strategies, including chromosome walking and multiplex oligonucleotide hybridization and gap filling. The region described is one of the targets of a large effort to create a series of mice with regional deletions on mouse chromosome 11 (33-80 cM) that can subsequently be subjected to further mutagenesis.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA75719

    Genomics 2000;69;1;139-42

  • Molecular cloning and characterization of Pals, proteins associated with mLin-7.

    Kamberov E, Makarova O, Roh M, Liu A, Karnak D, Straight S and Margolis B

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, three PDZ domain proteins, Lin-2, Lin-7, and Lin-10, are necessary for the proper targeting of the Let-23 growth factor receptor to the basolateral surface of epithelial cells. It has been demonstrated that homologues of Lin-2, Lin-7, and Lin-10 form a heterotrimeric complex in mammalian brain. Using Far Western overlay assay, we have identified additional proteins that can bind to the amino terminus of mLin-7 and cloned the genes encoding these proteins using bacterial expression cloning. We call these proteins Pals, for proteins associated with Lin-7. These proteins, which include mammalian Lin-2, contain a conserved mLin-7 binding domain in addition to guanylate kinase, PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/discs large/zona occludens-1), and Src homology 3 domains. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified the conserved residues among these proteins crucial for mLin-7 binding. Two of these proteins, Pals1 and Pals2, are newly described. Pals1 consists of 675 amino acids and maps to mouse chromosome 12. Pals2 was found to exist in two splice forms of 539 and 553 amino acids and maps to mouse chromosome 6. Like mLin-2, Pals1 and Pals2 localize to the lateral membrane in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Pals proteins represent a new subfamily of membrane-associated guanylate kinases that allow for multiple targeting complexes containing mLin-7.

    Funded by: NICHD NIH HHS: 5-T32-HD07505; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM08353

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2000;275;15;11425-31

  • Genetic mapping of 262 loci derived from expressed sequences in a murine interspecific cross using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis.

    Brady KP, Rowe LB, Her H, Stevens TJ, Eppig J, Sussman DJ, Sikela J and Beier DR

    Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    We have demonstrated previously that noncoding sequences of genes are a robust source of polymorphisms between mouse species when tested using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and that these polymorphisms are useful for genetic mapping. In this report we demonstrate that presumptive 3'-untranslated region sequence obtained from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) can be analyzed in a similar fashion, and we have used this approach to map 262 loci using an interspecific backcross. These results demonstrate SSCP analysis of genes or ESTs is a simple and efficient means for the genetic localization of transcribed sequences, and is furthermore an approach that is applicable to any system for which there is sufficient sequence polymorphism.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00941, HG00951

    Genome research 1997;7;11;1085-93

  • cDNA sequence and genomic structure of the murine p55 (Mpp1) gene.

    Elder B, Kuo K, Gitschier J, Kim A, Chishti A and Metzenberg A

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143, USA.

    MPP1 is an X-linked human gene encoding a heavily palmitoylated membrane protein (p55) with homology to the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene lethal(1) discs-large. As a first step toward studying the effects of mutations in this gene in a mammalian system, the nucleotide sequence of the mouse Mpp1 cDNA has been determined along with the intron-exon boundaries. Mpp1 is ubiquitously expressed and encodes a p55 protein of 466 amino acids with 93 and 65% identity to the human and puffer fish (Fugu rubripes) p55 sequences, respectively. The genomic structure of the Mpp1 gene is likewise conserved with 12 exons. The location of the Mpp1 gene, on the X chromosome, is also conserved between the human and the mouse. Conservation of the Mpp1 gene between mouse and human gives support to the notion that construction and study of a mouse knockout model may help establish the function of the human MPP1 gene, a potential tumor suppressor gene.

    Genomics 1996;38;2;231-4

Gene lists (7)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000001 G2C Mus musculus Mouse PSD Mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000007 G2C Mus musculus Mouse NRC Mouse NRC adapted from Collins et al (2006) 186
L00000008 G2C Mus musculus Mouse PSP Mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000060 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 748
L00000062 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus 984
L00000070 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list (ortho) 1461
L00000072 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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