G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002545
Gene symbol
FBXO41 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
F-box protein 41
Orthologue
G00001296 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000163013 (Ensembl human gene)
150726 (Entrez Gene)
870 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
FBXO41 (GeneCards)
Literature
609108 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:29409 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q8TF61 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • Fbx41
  • KIAA1940

Literature (6)

Pubmed - other

  • Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4.

    Hillier LW, Graves TA, Fulton RS, Fulton LA, Pepin KH, Minx P, Wagner-McPherson C, Layman D, Wylie K, Sekhon M, Becker MC, Fewell GA, Delehaunty KD, Miner TL, Nash WE, Kremitzki C, Oddy L, Du H, Sun H, Bradshaw-Cordum H, Ali J, Carter J, Cordes M, Harris A, Isak A, van Brunt A, Nguyen C, Du F, Courtney L, Kalicki J, Ozersky P, Abbott S, Armstrong J, Belter EA, Caruso L, Cedroni M, Cotton M, Davidson T, Desai A, Elliott G, Erb T, Fronick C, Gaige T, Haakenson W, Haglund K, Holmes A, Harkins R, Kim K, Kruchowski SS, Strong CM, Grewal N, Goyea E, Hou S, Levy A, Martinka S, Mead K, McLellan MD, Meyer R, Randall-Maher J, Tomlinson C, Dauphin-Kohlberg S, Kozlowicz-Reilly A, Shah N, Swearengen-Shahid S, Snider J, Strong JT, Thompson J, Yoakum M, Leonard S, Pearman C, Trani L, Radionenko M, Waligorski JE, Wang C, Rock SM, Tin-Wollam AM, Maupin R, Latreille P, Wendl MC, Yang SP, Pohl C, Wallis JW, Spieth J, Bieri TA, Berkowicz N, Nelson JO, Osborne J, Ding L, Meyer R, Sabo A, Shotland Y, Sinha P, Wohldmann PE, Cook LL, Hickenbotham MT, Eldred J, Williams D, Jones TA, She X, Ciccarelli FD, Izaurralde E, Taylor J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Cox DR, Huang X, McPherson JD, Mardis ER, Clifton SW, Warren WC, Chinwalla AT, Eddy SR, Marra MA, Ovcharenko I, Furey TS, Miller W, Eichler EE, Bork P, Suyama M, Torrents D, Waterston RH and Wilson RK

    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA.

    Human chromosome 2 is unique to the human lineage in being the product of a head-to-head fusion of two intermediate-sized ancestral chromosomes. Chromosome 4 has received attention primarily related to the search for the Huntington's disease gene, but also for genes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, polycystic kidney disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. Here we present approximately 237 million base pairs of sequence for chromosome 2, and 186 million base pairs for chromosome 4, representing more than 99.6% of their euchromatic sequences. Our initial analyses have identified 1,346 protein-coding genes and 1,239 pseudogenes on chromosome 2, and 796 protein-coding genes and 778 pseudogenes on chromosome 4. Extensive analyses confirm the underlying construction of the sequence, and expand our understanding of the structure and evolution of mammalian chromosomes, including gene deserts, segmental duplications and highly variant regions.

    Nature 2005;434;7034;724-31

  • Systematic analysis and nomenclature of mammalian F-box proteins.

    Jin J, Cardozo T, Lovering RC, Elledge SJ, Pagano M and Harper JW

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA76584, R01 CA076584, R37 CA076584; NIA NIH HHS: AG11085, R01 AG011085; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM57587, R01 GM057587

    Genes & development 2004;18;21;2573-80

  • M-phase kinases induce phospho-dependent ubiquitination of somatic Wee1 by SCFbeta-TrCP.

    Watanabe N, Arai H, Nishihara Y, Taniguchi M, Watanabe N, Hunter T and Osada H

    Antibiotics Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. nwatanab@riken.go.jp

    Wee1, the Cdc2 inhibitory kinase, needs to be down-regulated at the onset of mitosis to ensure rapid activation of Cdc2. Previously, we have shown that human somatic Wee1 (Wee1A) is down-regulated both by protein phosphorylation and degradation, but the underlying mechanisms had not been elucidated. In the present study, we have identified the beta-transducin repeat-containing protein 1/2 (beta-TrCP1/2) F-box protein-containing SKP1/Cul1/F-box protein (SCF) complex (SCF(beta-TrCP1/2)) as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for Wee1A ubiquitination. Although Wee1A lacks a consensus DS(p)GXXS(p) phospho-dependent binding motif for beta-TrCP, recognition of Wee1A by beta-TrCP depended on phosphorylation, and two serine residues in Wee1A, S53 and S123, were found to be the most important phosphorylation sites for beta-TrCP recognition. We have found also that the major M-phase kinases polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and Cdc2 are responsible for the phosphorylation of S53 and S123, respectively, and that in each case phosphorylation generates an unconventional phospho-degron (signal for degradation) that can be recognized by beta-TrCP. Phosphorylation of Wee1A by these kinases cooperatively stimulated the recognition and ubiquitination of Wee1A by SCF(beta-TrCP1/2) in vitro. Mutation of these residues or depletion of beta-TrCP by small-interfering RNA treatment increased the stability of Wee1A in HeLa cells. Moreover, our analysis indicates that beta-TrCP-dependent degradation of Wee1A is important for the normal onset of M-phase in vivo. These results also establish the existence of a feedback loop between Cdc2 and Wee1A in somatic cells that depends on ubiquitination and protein degradation and ensures the rapid activation of Cdc2 when cells are ready to divide.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;13;4419-24

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XXII. The complete sequences of 50 new cDNA clones which code for large proteins.

    Nagase T, Kikuno R and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan. nagase@kazusa.or.jp

    As an extension of human cDNA projects for accumulating sequence information on the coding sequences of unidentified genes, we herein present the entire sequences of 50 cDNA clones, named KIAA1939-KIAA1988. cDNA clones to be entirely sequenced were selected by two approaches based on their protein-coding potentialities prior to sequencing: 10 cDNA clones were chosen because their encoding proteins had a molecular mass larger than 50 kDa in an in vitro transcription/translation system; the remaining 40 cDNA clones were selected because their putative proteins-as determined by analysis of the genomic sequences flanked by both the terminal sequences of cDNAs using the GENSCAN gene prediction program-were larger than 400 amino acid residues. According to the sequence data, the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames of cDNA clones analyzed here were 4.6 kb and 1.9 kb (643 amino acid residues), respectively. From the results of homology and motif searches against the public databases, the functional categories of the 31 predicted gene products could be assigned; 25 of these predicted gene products (81%) were classified into proteins relating to cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, and cell structure/motility. The expression profiles of the genes were also studied in 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions, spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, the products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 2001;8;6;319-27

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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