G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002155
Gene symbol
DNM3 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
dynamin 3
Orthologue
G00000906 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000197959 (Ensembl human gene)
26052 (Entrez Gene)
695 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DNM3 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:29125 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9UQ16 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • KIAA0820

Literature (25)

Pubmed - other

  • A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 22 loci associated with eight hematological parameters in the HaemGen consortium.

    Soranzo N, Spector TD, Mangino M, Kühnel B, Rendon A, Teumer A, Willenborg C, Wright B, Chen L, Li M, Salo P, Voight BF, Burns P, Laskowski RA, Xue Y, Menzel S, Altshuler D, Bradley JR, Bumpstead S, Burnett MS, Devaney J, Döring A, Elosua R, Epstein SE, Erber W, Falchi M, Garner SF, Ghori MJ, Goodall AH, Gwilliam R, Hakonarson HH, Hall AS, Hammond N, Hengstenberg C, Illig T, König IR, Knouff CW, McPherson R, Melander O, Mooser V, Nauck M, Nieminen MS, O'Donnell CJ, Peltonen L, Potter SC, Prokisch H, Rader DJ, Rice CM, Roberts R, Salomaa V, Sambrook J, Schreiber S, Schunkert H, Schwartz SM, Serbanovic-Canic J, Sinisalo J, Siscovick DS, Stark K, Surakka I, Stephens J, Thompson JR, Völker U, Völzke H, Watkins NA, Wells GA, Wichmann HE, Van Heel DA, Tyler-Smith C, Thein SL, Kathiresan S, Perola M, Reilly MP, Stewart AF, Erdmann J, Samani NJ, Meisinger C, Greinacher A, Deloukas P, Ouwehand WH and Gieger C

    Human Genetics, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK. ns6@sanger.ac.uk

    The number and volume of cells in the blood affect a wide range of disorders including cancer and cardiovascular, metabolic, infectious and immune conditions. We consider here the genetic variation in eight clinically relevant hematological parameters, including hemoglobin levels, red and white blood cell counts and platelet counts and volume. We describe common variants within 22 genetic loci reproducibly associated with these hematological parameters in 13,943 samples from six European population-based studies, including 6 associated with red blood cell parameters, 15 associated with platelet parameters and 1 associated with total white blood cell count. We further identified a long-range haplotype at 12q24 associated with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in 9,479 cases and 10,527 controls. We show that this haplotype demonstrates extensive disease pleiotropy, as it contains known risk loci for type 1 diabetes, hypertension and celiac disease and has been spread by a selective sweep specific to European and geographically nearby populations.

    Funded by: Canadian Institutes of Health Research: MOP77682, MOP82810, NA6650; Medical Research Council: G0000111; NCRR NIH HHS: U54 RR020278, U54 RR020278-01; NHLBI NIH HHS: R01 HL056931, R01 HL056931-02, R01 HL056931-03, R01 HL056931-04; Wellcome Trust

    Nature genetics 2009;41;11;1182-90

  • Genetic determinants of height growth assessed longitudinally from infancy to adulthood in the northern Finland birth cohort 1966.

    Sovio U, Bennett AJ, Millwood IY, Molitor J, O'Reilly PF, Timpson NJ, Kaakinen M, Laitinen J, Haukka J, Pillas D, Tzoulaki I, Molitor J, Hoggart C, Coin LJ, Whittaker J, Pouta A, Hartikainen AL, Freimer NB, Widen E, Peltonen L, Elliott P, McCarthy MI and Jarvelin MR

    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified dozens of common variants associated with adult height. However, it is unknown how these variants influence height growth during childhood. We derived peak height velocity in infancy (PHV1) and puberty (PHV2) and timing of pubertal height growth spurt from parametric growth curves fitted to longitudinal height growth data to test their association with known height variants. The study consisted of N = 3,538 singletons from the prospective Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 with genotype data and frequent height measurements (on average 20 measurements per person) from 0-20 years. Twenty-six of the 48 variants tested associated with adult height (p<0.05, adjusted for sex and principal components) in this sample, all in the same direction as in previous GWA scans. Seven SNPs in or near the genes HHIP, DLEU7, UQCC, SF3B4/SV2A, LCORL, and HIST1H1D associated with PHV1 and five SNPs in or near SOCS2, SF3B4/SV2A, C17orf67, CABLES1, and DOT1L with PHV2 (p<0.05). We formally tested variants for interaction with age (infancy versus puberty) and found biologically meaningful evidence for an age-dependent effect for the SNP in SOCS2 (p = 0.0030) and for the SNP in HHIP (p = 0.045). We did not have similar prior evidence for the association between height variants and timing of pubertal height growth spurt as we had for PHVs, and none of the associations were statistically significant after correction for multiple testing. The fact that in this sample, less than half of the variants associated with adult height had a measurable effect on PHV1 or PHV2 is likely to reflect limited power to detect these associations in this dataset. Our study is the first genetic association analysis on longitudinal height growth in a prospective cohort from birth to adulthood and gives grounding for future research on the genetic regulation of human height during different periods of growth.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0500539, G0600705; NHLBI NIH HHS: 5R01HL087679-02, R01 HL087679; NIMH NIH HHS: 1RL1MH083268-01, RL1 MH083268; Wellcome Trust: GR069224

    PLoS genetics 2009;5;3;e1000409

  • Dynamin 3 participates in the growth and development of megakaryocytes.

    Reems JA, Wang W, Tsubata K, Abdurrahman N, Sundell B, Tijssen MR, van der Schoot E, Di Summa F, Patel-Hett S, Italiano J and Gilligan DM

    Northwest Tissue Services/Puget Sound Blood Center, Department of Medicine, Hematology Division, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98104, USA. joannar@psbc.org

    High-density oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles from uncultured CD34+/CD38lo cells and culture-derived megakaryocytes (MKs). As previously published, three replicate microarray data sets from three different sources of organ donor marrow were analyzed using the software program Rosetta Resolver. After setting a stringent p value of <or=0.001 with a fold change cutoff of three or more in expression level, dynamin 3 (DNM3) was identified to be differentially expressed during the course of MK development with a mean fold-change of 8.2+/-2.1 (mean+/-standard deviation). DNM3 is a member of a family of mechanochemical enzymes (DNM1, DNM2, and DNM3) known for their participation in membrane dynamics by hydrolyzing nucleotides to link cellular membranes to the actin cytoskeleton. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction confirmed that DNM3 increased by 20.7-+/-3.4-fold (n=4, p=0.09) during megakaryocytopoiesis and Western blot analysis showed that DNM3 protein was expressed in human MKs. Confocal microscopy revealed that DNM3 was distributed diffusely throughout the cytoplasm of MKs with a punctate appearance in proplatelet processes. Immunogold electron microscopy also showed that DNM3 is widely distributed in the cytoplasm of MKs, with no apparent localization to specific organelles. The open reading frame of DNM3 was cloned from culture-derived human MKs and determined to be 100% identical to the protein encoded by the DNM3 transcript variant ENST00000367731 published in the Ensemble database. Overexpression of DNM3 in umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells resulted in an increase in total nucleated cells, an amplification of total colony-forming cells and colony-forming unit-megakaryocytes, and a concomitant increase in the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2) and beta-tubulin. Together these findings provide the first evidence that a member of the dynamin family of mechanochemical enzymes is present in human MKs and indicate that DNM3 is an excellent candidate for playing an important role in mediating cytoskeleton and membrane changes that occur during MK/platelet development.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL068130, HL081015, HL74396, P50 HL081015-030002, R01 HL068130, R01 HL068130-07, R01 HL074396-04

    Experimental hematology 2008;36;12;1714-27

  • Agonist-induced internalization of histamine H2 receptor and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases are dynamin-dependent.

    Xu AJ, Kuramasu A, Maeda K, Kinoshita K, Takayanagi S, Fukushima Y, Watanabe T, Yanagisawa T, Sukegawa J and Yanai K

    Departments of Pharmacology, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Japan.

    Histamine H2 receptor (H2R) is a member of G protein-coupled receptor family. Agonist stimulation of H2R results in several cellular events including activation of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C, desensitization of the receptor, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and receptor endocytosis. In this study, we identified a GTPase dynamin as a binding partner of H2R. Dynamin could associate with H2R both in vitro and in vivo. Functional analyses using dominant-negative form of dynamin (K44E-dynamin) revealed that cAMP production and the following H2R desensitization are independent of dynamin. However, the agonist-induced H2R internalization was inhibited by co-expression of K44E-dynamin. Furthermore, activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases ERK1/2 in response to dimaprit, an H2R agonist, was attenuated by K44E-dynamin. Although H2R with truncation of 51 amino acids at its carboxy-terminus did not internalize after agonist stimulation, it still activated ERK1/2, but the degree of this activation was less than that of the wild-type receptor. Finally, K44E dynamin did not affect ERK1/2 activation induced by internalization-deficient H2R. These results suggest that the agonist-induced H2R internalization and ERK1/2 activation are partially dynamin-dependent. Furthermore, ERK1/2 activation via H2R is likely dependent of the endocytotic process rather than dynamin itself.

    Journal of neurochemistry 2008;107;1;208-17

  • Many sequence variants affecting diversity of adult human height.

    Gudbjartsson DF, Walters GB, Thorleifsson G, Stefansson H, Halldorsson BV, Zusmanovich P, Sulem P, Thorlacius S, Gylfason A, Steinberg S, Helgadottir A, Ingason A, Steinthorsdottir V, Olafsdottir EJ, Olafsdottir GH, Jonsson T, Borch-Johnsen K, Hansen T, Andersen G, Jorgensen T, Pedersen O, Aben KK, Witjes JA, Swinkels DW, den Heijer M, Franke B, Verbeek AL, Becker DM, Yanek LR, Becker LC, Tryggvadottir L, Rafnar T, Gulcher J, Kiemeney LA, Kong A, Thorsteinsdottir U and Stefansson K

    deCODE Genetics, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. daniel.gudbjartsson@decode.is

    Adult human height is one of the classical complex human traits. We searched for sequence variants that affect height by scanning the genomes of 25,174 Icelanders, 2,876 Dutch, 1,770 European Americans and 1,148 African Americans. We then combined these results with previously published results from the Diabetes Genetics Initiative on 3,024 Scandinavians and tested a selected subset of SNPs in 5,517 Danes. We identified 27 regions of the genome with one or more sequence variants showing significant association with height. The estimated effects per allele of these variants ranged between 0.3 and 0.6 cm and, taken together, they explain around 3.7% of the population variation in height. The genes neighboring the identified loci cluster in biological processes related to skeletal development and mitosis. Association to three previously reported loci are replicated in our analyses, and the strongest association was with SNPs in the ZBTB38 gene.

    Nature genetics 2008;40;5;609-15

  • Sézary syndrome is a unique cutaneous T-cell lymphoma as identified by an expanded gene signature including diagnostic marker molecules CDO1 and DNM3.

    Booken N, Gratchev A, Utikal J, Weiss C, Yu X, Qadoumi M, Schmuth M, Sepp N, Nashan D, Rass K, Tüting T, Assaf C, Dippel E, Stadler R, Klemke CD and Goerdt S

    Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Centre Mannheim, Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. nina.booken@haut.ma.uni-heidelberg.de

    Sezary syndrome (SS) is a rare, aggressive CD4+ cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL); molecular traits differentiating SS from nonleukemic mycosis fungoides (MF) and from inflammatory skin diseases (ID) are not sufficiently characterized. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 10 SS patients and 10 healthy donors (HD) were screened by Affymetrix U133Plus2.0 chips for differential gene expression. Ten candidate genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR to be significantly overexpressed in CD4+ T cells of SS versus HD/ID. For easier clinical use, these genes were re-analyzed in PBMC; qRT-PCR confirmed five novel (DNM3, IGFL2, CDO1, NEDD4L, KLHDC5) and two known genes (PLS3, TNFSF11) to be significantly overexpressed in SS. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that CDO1 and DNM3 had the highest discriminative power in combination. Upon comparison of PBMC and skin samples of SS versus MF, CDO1 and DNM3 were found upregulated only in SS. Using anti-CDO1 antisera, differential expression of CDO1 protein was confirmed in SS CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, DNM3 and CDO1 are known to be regulated by SS-associated transcription factors TWIST1 and c-myb, respectively. Furthermore, CDO1 catalyzes taurine synthesis and taurine inhibits apoptosis and promotes chemoprotection. In summary, CDO1 and DNM3 may improve the diagnosis of SS and open novel clues to its pathogenesis.

    Leukemia 2008;22;2;393-9

  • Postsynaptic positioning of endocytic zones and AMPA receptor cycling by physical coupling of dynamin-3 to Homer.

    Lu J, Helton TD, Blanpied TA, Rácz B, Newpher TM, Weinberg RJ and Ehlers MD

    Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

    Endocytosis of AMPA receptors and other postsynaptic cargo occurs at endocytic zones (EZs), stably positioned sites of clathrin adjacent to the postsynaptic density (PSD). The tight localization of postsynaptic endocytosis is thought to control spine composition and regulate synaptic transmission. However, the mechanisms that situate the EZ near the PSD and the role of spine endocytosis in synaptic transmission are unknown. Here, we report that a physical link between dynamin-3 and the postsynaptic adaptor Homer positions the EZ near the PSD. Disruption of dynamin-3 or its interaction with Homer uncouples the PSD from the EZ, resulting in synapses lacking postsynaptic clathrin. Loss of the EZ leads to a loss of synaptic AMPA receptors and reduced excitatory synaptic transmission that corresponds with impaired synaptic recycling. Thus, a physical link between the PSD and the EZ ensures localized endocytosis and recycling by recapturing and maintaining a proximate pool of cycling AMPA receptors.

    Funded by: NIA NIH HHS: R01 AG024492, R01 AG024492-01, R01 AG024492-02, R01 AG024492-03, R01 AG024492-04, R01 AG024492-05; NINDS NIH HHS: R01 NS039402, R01 NS039402-07, R01 NS039402-08, R01 NS039402-09, R01 NS047574, R01 NS047574-01A2, R01 NS047574-02, R01 NS047574-03, R01 NS047574-04

    Neuron 2007;55;6;874-89

  • Systematic identification of SH3 domain-mediated human protein-protein interactions by peptide array target screening.

    Wu C, Ma MH, Brown KR, Geisler M, Li L, Tzeng E, Jia CY, Jurisica I and Li SS

    Department of Biochemistry and the Siebens-Drake Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Systematic identification of direct protein-protein interactions is often hampered by difficulties in expressing and purifying the corresponding full-length proteins. By taking advantage of the modular nature of many regulatory proteins, we attempted to simplify protein-protein interactions to the corresponding domain-ligand recognition and employed peptide arrays to identify such binding events. A group of 12 Src homology (SH) 3 domains from eight human proteins (Swiss-Prot ID: SRC, PLCG1, P85A, NCK1, GRB2, FYN, CRK) were used to screen a peptide target array composed of 1536 potential ligands, which led to the identification of 921 binary interactions between these proteins and 284 targets. To assess the efficiency of the peptide array target screening (PATS) method in identifying authentic protein-protein interactions, we examined a set of interactions mediated by the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain by coimmunoprecipitation and/or affinity pull-downs using full-length proteins and achieved a 75% success rate. Furthermore, we characterized a novel interaction between PLCgamma1 and hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1) identified by PATS and demonstrated that the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain negatively regulated HPK1 kinase activity. Compared to protein interactions listed in the online predicted human interaction protein database (OPHID), the majority of interactions identified by PATS are novel, suggesting that, when extended to the large number of peptide interaction domains encoded by the human genome, PATS should aid in the mapping of the human interactome.

    Proteomics 2007;7;11;1775-85

  • The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    Gregory SG, Barlow KF, McLay KE, Kaul R, Swarbreck D, Dunham A, Scott CE, Howe KL, Woodfine K, Spencer CC, Jones MC, Gillson C, Searle S, Zhou Y, Kokocinski F, McDonald L, Evans R, Phillips K, Atkinson A, Cooper R, Jones C, Hall RE, Andrews TD, Lloyd C, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Ambrose KD, Anderson F, Andrew RW, Ashwell RI, Aubin K, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Beasley H, Bethel G, Bird CP, Bray-Allen S, Brown JY, Brown AJ, Buckley D, Burton J, Bye J, Carder C, Chapman JC, Clark SY, Clarke G, Clee C, Cobley V, Collier RE, Corby N, Coville GJ, Davies J, Deadman R, Dunn M, Earthrowl M, Ellington AG, Errington H, Frankish A, Frankland J, French L, Garner P, Garnett J, Gay L, Ghori MR, Gibson R, Gilby LM, Gillett W, Glithero RJ, Grafham DV, Griffiths C, Griffiths-Jones S, Grocock R, Hammond S, Harrison ES, Hart E, Haugen E, Heath PD, Holmes S, Holt K, Howden PJ, Hunt AR, Hunt SE, Hunter G, Isherwood J, James R, Johnson C, Johnson D, Joy A, Kay M, Kershaw JK, Kibukawa M, Kimberley AM, King A, Knights AJ, Lad H, Laird G, Lawlor S, Leongamornlert DA, Lloyd DM, Loveland J, Lovell J, Lush MJ, Lyne R, Martin S, Mashreghi-Mohammadi M, Matthews L, Matthews NS, McLaren S, Milne S, Mistry S, Moore MJ, Nickerson T, O'Dell CN, Oliver K, Palmeiri A, Palmer SA, Parker A, Patel D, Pearce AV, Peck AI, Pelan S, Phelps K, Phillimore BJ, Plumb R, Rajan J, Raymond C, Rouse G, Saenphimmachak C, Sehra HK, Sheridan E, Shownkeen R, Sims S, Skuce CD, Smith M, Steward C, Subramanian S, Sycamore N, Tracey A, Tromans A, Van Helmond Z, Wall M, Wallis JM, White S, Whitehead SL, Wilkinson JE, Willey DL, Williams H, Wilming L, Wray PW, Wu Z, Coulson A, Vaudin M, Sulston JE, Durbin R, Hubbard T, Wooster R, Dunham I, Carter NP, McVean G, Ross MT, Harrow J, Olson MV, Beck S, Rogers J, Bentley DR, Banerjee R, Bryant SP, Burford DC, Burrill WD, Clegg SM, Dhami P, Dovey O, Faulkner LM, Gribble SM, Langford CF, Pandian RD, Porter KM and Prigmore E

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. sgregory@chg.duhs.duke.edu

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0000107; Wellcome Trust

    Nature 2006;441;7091;315-21

  • The LIFEdb database in 2006.

    Mehrle A, Rosenfelder H, Schupp I, del Val C, Arlt D, Hahne F, Bechtel S, Simpson J, Hofmann O, Hide W, Glatting KH, Huber W, Pepperkok R, Poustka A and Wiemann S

    Division Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. a.mehrle@dkfz.de

    LIFEdb (http://www.LIFEdb.de) integrates data from large-scale functional genomics assays and manual cDNA annotation with bioinformatics gene expression and protein analysis. New features of LIFEdb include (i) an updated user interface with enhanced query capabilities, (ii) a configurable output table and the option to download search results in XML, (iii) the integration of data from cell-based screening assays addressing the influence of protein-overexpression on cell proliferation and (iv) the display of the relative expression ('Electronic Northern') of the genes under investigation using curated gene expression ontology information. LIFEdb enables researchers to systematically select and characterize genes and proteins of interest, and presents data and information via its user-friendly web-based interface.

    Nucleic acids research 2006;34;Database issue;D415-8

  • From ORFeome to biology: a functional genomics pipeline.

    Wiemann S, Arlt D, Huber W, Wellenreuther R, Schleeger S, Mehrle A, Bechtel S, Sauermann M, Korf U, Pepperkok R, Sültmann H and Poustka A

    Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. s.wiemann@dkfz.de

    As several model genomes have been sequenced, the elucidation of protein function is the next challenge toward the understanding of biological processes in health and disease. We have generated a human ORFeome resource and established a functional genomics and proteomics analysis pipeline to address the major topics in the post-genome-sequencing era: the identification of human genes and splice forms, and the determination of protein localization, activity, and interaction. Combined with the understanding of when and where gene products are expressed in normal and diseased conditions, we create information that is essential for understanding the interplay of genes and proteins in the complex biological network. We have implemented bioinformatics tools and databases that are suitable to store, analyze, and integrate the different types of data from high-throughput experiments and to include further annotation that is based on external information. All information is presented in a Web database (http://www.dkfz.de/LIFEdb). It is exploited for the identification of disease-relevant genes and proteins for diagnosis and therapy.

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2136-44

  • A novel dynamin-associating molecule, formin-binding protein 17, induces tubular membrane invaginations and participates in endocytosis.

    Kamioka Y, Fukuhara S, Sawa H, Nagashima K, Masuda M, Matsuda M and Mochizuki N

    Department of Structural Analysis, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565, Japan.

    Dynamin associates with a variety of SH3 domain-containing molecules via a C-terminal proline-rich motif and takes part, with them, in endocytic processes. Here, we have investigated a new dynamin-associating molecule, formin-binding protein 17 (FBP17), involved in deforming the plasma membrane and in endocytosis. FBP17 formed tubular invaginations originating from the plasma membrane. Its N-terminal Fer/CIP4 homology domain, a coiled-coil domain, and a proline-rich motif were required for tubular invagination and self-assembly, by which tubular invagination might be induced. Using anti-FBP17 antibody, we detected positive immunoreactions in the testis that were restricted to the germ cells. We also detected FBP17 in the brain by immunoblotting and in situ hybridization. When COS cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged FBP17 were incubated with fluorescently labeled transferrin, epidermal growth factor, and cholera toxin, these molecules co-localized with FBP17-induced tubular invaginations, suggesting that FBP17 is involved in dynamin-mediated endocytosis in both a clathrin-dependent and -independent manner. These observations therefore indicate that FBP17 interacts with dynamin and regulates endocytosis by forming vesicotubular structures.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2004;279;38;40091-9

  • Improved detection of hydrophilic phosphopeptides using graphite powder microcolumns and mass spectrometry: evidence for in vivo doubly phosphorylated dynamin I and dynamin III.

    Larsen MR, Graham ME, Robinson PJ and Roepstorff P

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark. mrl@bmb.sdu.dk

    A common strategy in proteomics to improve the number and quality of peptides detected by mass spectrometry (MS) is to desalt and concentrate proteolytic digests using reversed phase (RP) chromatography prior to analysis. However, this does not allow for detection of small or hydrophilic peptides, or peptides altered in hydrophilicity such as phosphopeptides. We used microcolumns to compare the ability of RP resin or graphite powder to retain phosphopeptides. A number of standard phosphopeptides and a biologically relevant phosphoprotein, dynamin I, were analyzed. MS revealed that some phosphopeptides did not bind the RP resin but were retained efficiently on the graphite. Those that did bind the RP resin often produced much stronger signals from the graphite powder. In particular, the method revealed a doubly phosphorylated peptide in a tryptic digest of dynamin I purified from rat brain nerve terminals. The detection of this peptide was greatly enhanced by graphite micropurification. Sequencing by tandem MS confirmed the presence of phosphate at both Ser-774 and Ser-778, while a singly phosphorylated peptide was predominantly phosphorylated only on Ser-774. The method further revealed a singly and doubly phosphorylated peptide in dynamin III, analogous to the dynamin I sequence. A pair of dynamin III phosphorylation sites were found at Ser-759 and Ser-763 by tandem MS. The results directly define the in vivo phosphorylation sites in dynamins I and III for the first time. The findings indicate a large improvement in the detection of small amounts of phosphopeptides by MS and the approach has major implications for both small- and large-scale projects in phosphoproteomics.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2004;3;5;456-65

  • Proteomic identification of brain proteins that interact with dynein light chain LC8.

    Navarro-Lérida I, Martínez Moreno M, Roncal F, Gavilanes F, Albar JP and Rodríguez-Crespo I

    Departamento de Bioquímicay Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. nacho@bbml.ucm.es

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a large minus end-directed microtubule motor that translocates cargos towards the minus end of microtubules. Light chain 8 of the dynein machinery (LC8) has been reported to interact with a large variety of proteins that possess K/RSTQT or GIQVD motifs in their sequence, hence permitting their transport in a retrograde manner. Yeast two-hybrid analysis has revealed that in brain, LC8 associates directly with several proteins such as neuronal nitric oxide synthase, guanylate kinase domain-associated protein and gephyrin. In this work, we report the identification of over 40 polypeptides, by means of a proteomic approach, that interact with LC8 either directly or indirectly. Many of the neuronal proteins that we identified cluster at the post-synaptic terminal, and some of them such as phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase or aldolase are directly involved in glutamate metabolism. Other pool of proteins identified displayed the LC8 consensus binding motif. Finally, recombinant LC8 was produced and a library of overlapping dodecapeptides (pepscan) was employed to map the LC8 binding site of some of the proteins that were previously identified using the proteomic approach, hence confirming binding to the consensus binding sites.

    Proteomics 2004;4;2;339-46

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Dynamin at the actin-membrane interface.

    Orth JD and McNiven MA

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Center for Basic Research in Digestive Diseases, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

    Many important cellular processes such as phagocytosis, cell motility and endocytosis require the participation of a dynamic and interactive actin cytoskeleton that acts to deform cellular membranes. The extensive family of non-traditional myosins has been implicated in linking the cortical actin gel with the plasma membrane. Recently, however, the dynamins have also been included in these cell processes as a second family of mechanochemical enzymes that self-associate and hydrolyze nucleotides to perform 'work' while linking cellular membranes to the actin cytoskeleton. The dynamins are believed to form large helical polymers from which extend many interactive proline-rich tail domains, and these domains bind to a variety of SH3-domain-containing proteins, many of which appear to be actin-binding proteins. Recent data support the concept that the dynamin family might act as a 'polymeric contractile scaffold' at the interface between biological membranes and filamentous actin.

    Current opinion in cell biology 2003;15;1;31-9

  • Dynamin and endocytosis.

    Sever S

    Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 1 Jimmy Fund Way, Boston, MA 02115, USA. sanja_sever@dfci.harvard.edu

    The GTPase dynamin is essential for endocytosis, but its mechanism of action remains uncertain. Structures of its GTPase domain, as well as that of assembled dynamin, have led to major advances in understanding the structural basis of its mode of action. Novel data point more clearly than ever towards a role for this protein in the actin cytoskeleton, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and apoptosis, suggesting that dynamin might be a signaling GTPase.

    Current opinion in cell biology 2002;14;4;463-7

  • Construction of expression-ready cDNA clones for KIAA genes: manual curation of 330 KIAA cDNA clones.

    Nakajima D, Okazaki N, Yamakawa H, Kikuno R, Ohara O and Nagase T

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    We have accumulated information on protein-coding sequences of uncharacterized human genes, which are known as KIAA genes, through cDNA sequencing. For comprehensive functional analysis of the KIAA genes, it is necessary to prepare a set of cDNA clones which direct the synthesis of functional KIAA gene products. However, since the KIAA cDNAs were derived from long mRNAs (> 4 kb), it was not expected that all of them were full-length. Thus, as the first step toward preparing these clones, we evaluated the integrity of protein-coding sequences of KIAA cDNA clones through comparison with homologous protein entries in the public database. As a result, 1141 KIAA cDNAs had at least one homologous entry in the database, and 619 of them (54%) were found to be truncated at the 5' and/or 3' ends. In this study, 290 KIAA cDNA clones were tailored to be full-length or have considerably longer sequences than the original clones by isolating additional cDNA clones and/or connected parts of additional cDNAs or PCR products of the missing portion to the original cDNA clone. Consequently, 265, 8, and 17 predicted CDSs of KIAA cDNA clones were increased in the amino-, carboxy-, and both terminal sequences, respectively. In addition, 40 cDNA clones were modified to remove spurious interruption of protein-coding sequences. The total length of the resultant extensions at amino- and carboxy-terminals of KIAA gene products reached 97,000 and 7,216 amino acid residues, respectively, and various protein domains were found in these extended portions.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 2002;9;3;99-106

  • Dynamin: characteristics, mechanism of action and function.

    Wiejak J and Wyroba E

    Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Pasteura 3, 02-093 Warszawa, Poland.

    Dynamin - a member of the GTP-ase protein family - is essential for many intracellular membrane trafficking events in multiple endocytic processes. The unique biochemical features of dynamin - especially its propensity to assemble - enable severing the nascent vesicles from the membrane. The mechanism of dynamin's action is still a subject of debate - whether it functions as a mechanochemical enzyme or a regulatory GTPase. The GTPase domain of dynamin contains three GTP-binding motifs. This domain is very conservative across the species, including that recently cloned by us in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium. Dynamin interacts with a number of partners such as endophilin and proteins involved in coordination of endocytosis with motor molecules. A growing body of evidence indicates that dynamin and dynamin-related proteins are involved both in pathology and protection against human diseases. The most interesting are dynamin-like Mx proteins exhibiting antiviral activity.

    Cellular & molecular biology letters 2002;7;4;1073-80

  • Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs.

    Wiemann S, Weil B, Wellenreuther R, Gassenhuber J, Glassl S, Ansorge W, Böcher M, Blöcker H, Bauersachs S, Blum H, Lauber J, Düsterhöft A, Beyer A, Köhrer K, Strack N, Mewes HW, Ottenwälder B, Obermaier B, Tampe J, Heubner D, Wambutt R, Korn B, Klein M and Poustka A

    Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. s.wiemann@dkfz.de

    With the complete human genomic sequence being unraveled, the focus will shift to gene identification and to the functional analysis of gene products. The generation of a set of cDNAs, both sequences and physical clones, which contains the complete and noninterrupted protein coding regions of all human genes will provide the indispensable tools for the systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein function to eventually understand the molecular basis of man. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of 500 novel human cDNAs containing the complete protein coding frame. Assignment to functional categories was possible for 52% (259) of the encoded proteins, the remaining fraction having no similarities with known proteins. By aligning the cDNA sequences with the sequences of the finished chromosomes 21 and 22 we identified a number of genes that either had been completely missed in the analysis of the genomic sequences or had been wrongly predicted. Three of these genes appear to be present in several copies. We conclude that full-length cDNA sequencing continues to be crucial also for the accurate identification of genes. The set of 500 novel cDNAs, and another 1000 full-coding cDNAs of known transcripts we have identified, adds up to cDNA representations covering 2%--5 % of all human genes. We thus substantially contribute to the generation of a gene catalog, consisting of both full-coding cDNA sequences and clones, which should be made freely available and will become an invaluable tool for detailed functional studies.

    Genome research 2001;11;3;422-35

  • DNA cloning using in vitro site-specific recombination.

    Hartley JL, Temple GF and Brasch MA

    Life Technologies, Inc., Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA. jhartley@lifetech.com

    As a result of numerous genome sequencing projects, large numbers of candidate open reading frames are being identified, many of which have no known function. Analysis of these genes typically involves the transfer of DNA segments into a variety of vector backgrounds for protein expression and functional analysis. We describe a method called recombinational cloning that uses in vitro site-specific recombination to accomplish the directional cloning of PCR products and the subsequent automatic subcloning of the DNA segment into new vector backbones at high efficiency. Numerous DNA segments can be transferred in parallel into many different vector backgrounds, providing an approach to high-throughput, in-depth functional analysis of genes and rapid optimization of protein expression. The resulting subclones maintain orientation and reading frame register, allowing amino- and carboxy-terminal translation fusions to be generated. In this paper, we outline the concepts of this approach and provide several examples that highlight some of its potential.

    Genome research 2000;10;11;1788-95

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Suyama M, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    In this paper, we report the sequences of 100 cDNA clones newly determined from a set of size-fractionated human brain cDNA libraries and predict the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0819 to KIAA0918. These cDNA clones were selected on the basis of their coding potentials of large proteins (50 kDa and more) by using in vitro transcription/translation assays. The sequence data showed that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames are 4.4 kb and 2.5 kb (831 amino acid residues), respectively. Homology and motif/domain searches against the public databases indicated that the predicted coding sequences of 83 genes were similar to those of known genes, 59% of which (49 genes) were categorized as coding for proteins functionally related to cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility and nucleic acid management. The chromosomal locations and the expression profiles of all the genes were also examined. For 54 clones including brain-specific ones, the mRNA levels were further examined among 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, and fetal brain.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1998;5;6;355-64

  • Homer binds a novel proline-rich motif and links group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors with IP3 receptors.

    Tu JC, Xiao B, Yuan JP, Lanahan AA, Leoffert K, Li M, Linden DJ and Worley PF

    Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) activate PI turnover and thereby trigger intracellular calcium release. Previously, we demonstrated that mGluRs form natural complexes with members of a family of Homer-related synaptic proteins. Here, we present evidence that Homer proteins form a physical tether linking mGluRs with the inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3R). A novel proline-rich "Homer ligand" (PPXXFr) is identified in group 1 mGluRs and IP3R, and these receptors coimmunoprecipitate as a complex with Homer from brain. Expression of the IEG form of Homer, which lacks the ability to cross-link, modulates mGluR-induced intracellular calcium release. These studies identify a novel mechanism in calcium signaling and provide evidence that an IEG, whose expression is driven by synaptic activity, can directly modify a specific synaptic function.

    Funded by: NIDA NIH HHS: DA 10309, DA 11742; NIMH NIH HHS: KO2 MH01152; ...

    Neuron 1998;21;4;717-26

  • Growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of the actin-binding protein cortactin is mediated by the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase FER.

    Kim L and Wong TW

    Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854, USA.

    Previous characterization of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase FER identified a tight physical association with the catenin pp120 and led to the suggestion that FER may be involved in cell-cell signaling. To further understand the function of FER, we have continued our analyses of the interaction of FER with pp120 and other proteins. The majority of FER is localized to the cytoplasmic fraction where it forms a complex with the actin-binding protein cortactin. The Src homology 2 sequence of FER is required for directly binding cortactin, and phosphorylation of the FER-cortactin complex is up-regulated in cells treated with peptide growth factors. Using a dominant-negative mutant of FER, we provided evidence that FER kinase activity is required for the growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of cortactin. These data suggest that cortactin is likely to be a direct substrate of FER. Our observations provide additional support for a role of FER in mediating signaling from the cell surface, via growth factor receptors, to the cytoskeleton. The nature of the FER-cortactin interaction, and their putative enzyme-substrate relationship, support the previous proposal that one of the functions of the Src homology 2 sequences of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases is to provide a binding site for their preferred substrates.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1998;273;36;23542-8

Gene lists (8)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000011 G2C Homo sapiens Human clathrin Human orthologues of mouse clathrin coated vesicle genes adapted from Collins et al (2006) 150
L00000012 G2C Homo sapiens Human Synaptosome Human orthologues of mouse synaptosome adapted from Collins et al (2006) 152
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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