G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002140
Gene symbol
SBF1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
SET binding factor 1
Orthologue
G00000891 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000030502 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000100241 (Ensembl human gene)
6305 (Entrez Gene)
533 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
SBF1 (GeneCards)
Literature
603560 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10542 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O95248 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • MTMR5

Literature (13)

Pubmed - other

  • Assessment of a polymorphism of SDK1 with hypertension in Japanese Individuals.

    Oguri M, Kato K, Yokoi K, Yoshida T, Watanabe S, Metoki N, Yoshida H, Satoh K, Aoyagi Y, Nozawa Y and Yamada Y

    Department of Cardiology, Japanese Red Cross Nagoya First Hospital, Nagoya, Japan.

    Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although genetic studies have suggested that several genetic variants increase the risk for hypertension, the genes that underlie genetic susceptibility to this condition remain to be identified definitively. The purpose of the present study was to identify genetic variants that confer susceptibility to hypertension in Japanese individuals.

    Methods: A total of 5,734 Japanese individuals from two independent populations were examined: subject panel A comprised 2,066 hypertensive individuals and 824 controls; and subject panel B comprised 834 hypertensive individuals and 2,010 controls. The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke with the use of the GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affymetrix).

    Results: The chi(2)-test revealed that 10 polymorphisms were significantly (P < 0.05) related to the prevalence of hypertension in subject panel A. To validate the relations, these polymorphisms were examined in subject panel B. The A-->G polymorphism (rs645106) of SDK1 and the C-->G polymorphism (rs12078839) of RABGAP1L were significantly associated with hypertension in subject panel B. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates, as well as a stepwise forward selection procedure revealed that the A-->G polymorphism of SDK1 was significantly associated with hypertension in both subject panels A and B, with the G allele protecting against this condition.

    Conclusions: SDK1 may be a susceptibility gene for hypertension in Japanese individuals, although the functional relevance of the identified polymorphism was not determined.

    American journal of hypertension 2010;23;1;70-7

  • Identification of potentially damaging amino acid substitutions leading to human male infertility.

    Kuzmin A, Jarvi K, Lo K, Spencer L, Chow GY, Macleod G, Wang Q and Varmuza S

    Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    There are a number of known genetic alterations found in men with nonobstructive azoospermia, or testicular failure, such as Y microdeletions and cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the etiology of nonobstructive azoospermia is unknown in the majority of men. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that unexplained cases of nonobstructive azoospermia are caused by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding regions of autosomal genes associated with sperm production and fertility. Using a candidate gene approach based on genetics of male infertility in mice, we resequenced nine autosomal genes from 78 infertile men displaying testicular failure using custom-made next-generation resequencing chips. Analysis of the data revealed several novel heterozygous nonsynonymous SNPs in four of nine sequenced genes in 14 of 78 infertile men. Eight SNPs in SBF1, three SNPs in LIMK2, two SNPs in LIPE, and one SNP in TBPL1 were identified. All of the novel mutations were in a heterozygous configuration, suggesting that they may be de novo mutations with dominant negative properties.

    Biology of reproduction 2009;81;2;319-26

  • Characterization of the interactome of the human MutL homologues MLH1, PMS1, and PMS2.

    Cannavo E, Gerrits B, Marra G, Schlapbach R and Jiricny J

    Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

    Postreplicative mismatch repair (MMR) involves the concerted action of at least 20 polypeptides. Although the minimal human MMR system has recently been reconstituted in vitro, genetic evidence from different eukaryotic organisms suggests that some steps of the MMR process may be carried out by more than one protein. Moreover, MMR proteins are involved also in other pathways of DNA metabolism, but their exact role in these processes is unknown. In an attempt to gain novel insights into the function of MMR proteins in human cells, we searched for interacting partners of the MutL homologues MLH1 and PMS2 by tandem affinity purification and of PMS1 by large scale immunoprecipitation. In addition to proteins known to interact with the MutL homologues during MMR, mass spectrometric analyses identified a number of other polypeptides, some of which bound to the above proteins with very high affinity. Whereas some of these interactors may represent novel members of the mismatch repairosome, others appear to implicate the MutL homologues in biological processes ranging from intracellular transport through cell signaling to cell morphology, recombination, and ubiquitylation.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2007;282;5;2976-86

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Regulation of myotubularin-related (MTMR)2 phosphatidylinositol phosphatase by MTMR5, a catalytically inactive phosphatase.

    Kim SA, Vacratsis PO, Firestein R, Cleary ML and Dixon JE

    Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0606, USA.

    The myotubularin (MTM) family constitutes one of the most highly conserved protein-tyrosine phosphatase subfamilies in eukaryotes. MTM1, the archetypal member of this family, is mutated in X-linked myotubular myopathy, whereas mutations in the MTM-related (MTMR)2 gene cause the type 4B1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a severe hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. In this study, we identified a protein that specifically interacts with MTMR2 but not MTM1. The interacting protein was shown by mass spectrometry to be MTMR5, a catalytically inactive member of the MTM family. We also demonstrate that MTMR2 interacts with MTMR5 via its coiled-coil domain and that mutations in the coiled-coil domain of either MTMR2 or MTMR5 abrogate this interaction. Through this interaction, MTMR5 increases the enzymatic activity of MTMR2 and dictates its subcellular localization. This article demonstrates an active MTM member being regulated by an inactive family member.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2003;100;8;4492-7

  • Male infertility, impaired spermatogenesis, and azoospermia in mice deficient for the pseudophosphatase Sbf1.

    Firestein R, Nagy PL, Daly M, Huie P, Conti M and Cleary ML

    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

    Pseudophosphatases display extensive sequence similarities to phosphatases but harbor amino acid alterations in their active-site consensus motifs that render them catalytically inactive. A potential role in substrate trapping or docking has been proposed, but the specific requirements for pseudophosphatases during development and differentiation are unknown. We demonstrate here that Sbf1, a pseudophosphatase of the myotubularin family, is expressed at high levels in seminiferous tubules of the testis, specifically in Sertoli's cells, spermatogonia, and pachytene spermatocytes, but not in postmeiotic round spermatids. Mice that are nullizygous for Sbf1 exhibit male infertility characterized by azoospermia. The onset of the spermatogenic defect occurs in the first wave of spermatogenesis at 17 days after birth during the synchronized progression of pachytene spermatocytes to haploid spermatids. Vacuolation of the Sertoli's cells is the earliest observed phenotype and is followed by reduced formation of spermatids and eventual depletion of the germ cell compartment in older mice. The nullizygous phenotype in conjunction with high-level expression of Sbf1 in premeiotic germ cells and Sertoli's cells is consistent with a crucial role for Sbf1 in transition from diploid to haploid spermatocytes. These studies demonstrate an essential role for a pseudophosphatase and implicate signaling pathways regulated by myotubularin family proteins in spermatogenesis and germ cell differentiation.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA-55029, R01 CA055029; NIGMS NIH HHS: 5T32GM07365, T32 GM007365

    The Journal of clinical investigation 2002;109;9;1165-72

  • Pseudo-phosphatase Sbf1 contains an N-terminal GEF homology domain that modulates its growth regulatory properties.

    Firestein R and Cleary ML

    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA.

    Sbf1 (SET binding factor 1) is a pseudo-phosphatase related to the myotubularin family of dual specificity phosphatases, some of which have been implicated in cellular growth and differentiation by virtue of their mutation in human genetic disorders. Sbf1 contains germline-encoded alterations of its myotubularin homology domain that render it non-functional as a phosphatase. We report here the complete structure of Sbfl and further characterization of its growth regulatory properties. In addition to its similarity to myotubularin, the predicted full-length Sbf1 protein contains pleckstrin (PH) and GEF homology domains that are conserved in several proteins implicated in signaling and growth control. Forced expression of wild-type Sbfl in NIH 3T3 cells inhibited their proliferation and altered their morphology. These effects required intact PH, GEF and myotubularin homology domains, implying that growth inhibition may be an intrinsic property of wild-type Sbf1. Conversely, deletion of its conserved N-terminal 44 amino acids alone was sufficient to convert Sbf1 from an inhibitor of cellular growth to a transforming protein in NIH 3T3 cells. Oncogenic forms of Sbf1 partially localized to the nucleus, in contrast to the exclusively cytoplasmic subcellular localization of endogenous Sbf1 in all cell lines and mammalian tissues tested. These data show that the N-terminal GEF homology domain serves to inhibit the transforming effects of Sbf1, possibly sequestering the protein to the cytoplasm, and suggest that this region may be a modulatory domain that relays growth control signals.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA55029; NIGMS NIH HHS: 5T32GM07365

    Journal of cell science 2001;114;Pt 16;2921-7

  • Set domain-dependent regulation of transcriptional silencing and growth control by SUV39H1, a mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Su(var)3-9.

    Firestein R, Cui X, Huie P and Cleary ML

    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, CA 94305, USA.

    Mammalian SET domain-containing proteins define a distinctive class of chromatin-associated factors that are targets for growth control signals and oncogenic activation. SUV39H1, a mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Su(var)3-9, contains both SET and chromo domains, signature motifs for proteins that contribute to epigenetic control of gene expression through effects on the regional organization of chromatin structure. In this report we demonstrate that SUV39H1 represses transcription in a transient transcriptional assay when tethered to DNA through the GAL4 DNA binding domain. Under these conditions, SUV39H1 displays features of a long-range repressor capable of acting over several kilobases to silence basal promoters. A possible role in chromatin-mediated gene silencing is supported by the localization of exogenously expressed SUV39H1 to nuclear bodies with morphologic features suggestive of heterochromatin in interphase cells. In addition, we show that SUV39H1 is phosphorylated specifically at the G(1)/S cell cycle transition and when forcibly expressed suppresses cell growth. Growth suppression as well as the ability of SUV39H1 to form nuclear bodies and silence transcription are antagonized by the oncogenic antiphosphatase Sbf1 that when hyperexpressed interacts with the SET domain and stabilizes the phosphorylated form of SUV39H1. These studies suggest a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism for regulating the chromatin organizing activity of a mammalian su(var) protein and implicate the SET domain as a gatekeeper motif that integrates upstream signaling pathways to epigenetic regulation and growth control.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA55029, R01 CA055029; NIGMS NIH HHS: 5T32GM07365, T32 GM007365

    Molecular and cellular biology 2000;20;13;4900-9

  • The DNA sequence of human chromosome 22.

    Dunham I, Shimizu N, Roe BA, Chissoe S, Hunt AR, Collins JE, Bruskiewich R, Beare DM, Clamp M, Smink LJ, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Babbage A, Bagguley C, Bailey J, Barlow K, Bates KN, Beasley O, Bird CP, Blakey S, Bridgeman AM, Buck D, Burgess J, Burrill WD, O'Brien KP et al.

    Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. id1@sanger.ac.uk

    Knowledge of the complete genomic DNA sequence of an organism allows a systematic approach to defining its genetic components. The genomic sequence provides access to the complete structures of all genes, including those without known function, their control elements, and, by inference, the proteins they encode, as well as all other biologically important sequences. Furthermore, the sequence is a rich and permanent source of information for the design of further biological studies of the organism and for the study of evolution through cross-species sequence comparison. The power of this approach has been amply demonstrated by the determination of the sequences of a number of microbial and model organisms. The next step is to obtain the complete sequence of the entire human genome. Here we report the sequence of the euchromatic part of human chromosome 22. The sequence obtained consists of 12 contiguous segments spanning 33.4 megabases, contains at least 545 genes and 134 pseudogenes, and provides the first view of the complex chromosomal landscapes that will be found in the rest of the genome.

    Nature 1999;402;6761;489-95

  • Characterization of the myotubularin dual specificity phosphatase gene family from yeast to human.

    Laporte J, Blondeau F, Buj-Bello A, Tentler D, Kretz C, Dahl N and Mandel JL

    Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP, 1 rue Laurent Fries, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, France.

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a severe congenital muscle disorder due to mutations in the MTM1 gene. The corresponding protein, myotubularin, contains the consensus active site of tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) but otherwise shows no homology to other phosphatases. Myotubularin is able to hydrolyze a synthetic analogue of tyrosine phosphate, in a reaction inhibited by orthovanadate, and was recently shown to act on both phosphotyrosine and phosphoserine. This gene is conserved down to yeast and strong homologies were found with human ESTs, thus defining a new dual specificity phosphatase (DSP) family. We report the presence of novel members of the MTM gene family in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans, zebrafish, Drosophila, mouse and man. This represents the largest family of DSPs described to date. Eight MTM-related genes were found in the human genome and we determined the chromosomal localization and expression pattern for most of them. A subclass of the myotubularin homologues lacks a functional PTP active site. Missense mutations found in XLMTM patients affect residues conserved in a Drosophila homologue. Comparison of the various genes allowed construction of a phylogenetic tree and reveals conserved residues which may be essential for function. These genes may be good candidates for other genetic diseases.

    Human molecular genetics 1998;7;11;1703-12

  • Association of SET domain and myotubularin-related proteins modulates growth control.

    Cui X, De Vivo I, Slany R, Miyamoto A, Firestein R and Cleary ML

    Department of Pathology, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305, USA.

    Several proteins that contribute to epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation contain a characteristic motif of unknown function called the SET (Suvar3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax) domain. We have demonstrated that SET domains mediate highly conserved interactions with a specific family of proteins that display similarity with dual-specificity phosphatases (dsPTPases). These include myotubularin, the gene of which is mutated in a subset of patients with X-linked myotubular myopathy, and Sbf1, a newly isolated homologue of myotubularin. In contrast with myotubularin, Sbf1 lacks a functional catalytic domain which dephosphorylates phospho-tyrosine and serine-containing peptides in vitro. Competitive interference of endogenous SET domain-dsPTPase interactions by forced expression of Sbf1 induced oncogenic transformation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and impaired the in vitro differentiation of C2 myoblast cells. We conclude that myotubularin-type phosphatases link SET-domain containing components of the epigenetic regulatory machinery with signalling pathways involved in growth and differentiation.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA55029; NIAID NIH HHS: AI-07290

    Nature genetics 1998;18;4;331-7

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

Cookies Policy | Terms and Conditions. This site is hosted by Edinburgh University and the Genes to Cognition Programme.