G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002130
Gene symbol
AAK1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
AP2 associated kinase 1
Orthologue
G00000881 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000115977 (Ensembl human gene)
22848 (Entrez Gene)
494 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
AAK1 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:19679 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q2M2I8 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • DKFZp686K16132
  • KIAA1048

Literature (20)

Pubmed - other

  • Genomewide association study for onset age in Parkinson disease.

    Latourelle JC, Pankratz N, Dumitriu A, Wilk JB, Goldwurm S, Pezzoli G, Mariani CB, DeStefano AL, Halter C, Gusella JF, Nichols WC, Myers RH, Foroud T, PROGENI Investigators, Coordinators and Molecular G 1f40 enetic Laboratories and GenePD Investigators, Coordinators and Molecular Genetic Laboratories

    Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. jlatoure@bu.edu

    Background: Age at onset in Parkinson disease (PD) is a highly heritable quantitative trait for which a significant genetic influence is supported by multiple segregation analyses. Because genes associated with onset age may represent invaluable therapeutic targets to delay the disease, we sought to identify such genetic modifiers using a genomewide association study in familial PD. There have been previous genomewide association studies (GWAS) to identify genes influencing PD susceptibility, but this is the first to identify genes contributing to the variation in onset age.

    Methods: Initial analyses were performed using genotypes generated with the Illumina HumanCNV370Duo array in a sample of 857 unrelated, familial PD cases. Subsequently, a meta-analysis of imputed SNPs was performed combining the familial PD data with that from a previous GWAS of 440 idiopathic PD cases. The SNPs from the meta-analysis with the lowest p-values and consistency in the direction of effect for onset age were then genotyped in a replication sample of 747 idiopathic PD cases from the Parkinson Institute Biobank of Milan, Italy.

    Results: Meta-analysis across the three studies detected consistent association (p < 1 x 10(-5)) with five SNPs, none of which reached genomewide significance. On chromosome 11, the SNP with the lowest p-value (rs10767971; p = 5.4 x 10(-7)) lies between the genes QSER1 and PRRG4. Near the PARK3 linkage region on chromosome 2p13, association was observed with a SNP (rs7577851; p = 8.7 x 10(-6)) which lies in an intron of the AAK1 gene. This gene is closely related to GAK, identified as a possible PD susceptibility gene in the GWAS of the familial PD cases.

    Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest an influence of genes involved in endocytosis and lysosomal sorting in PD pathogenesis.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HHSN268200782096C; NIEHS NIH HHS: R01 ES010751; NINDS NIH HHS: R01 NS033978, R01 NS036711, R01 NS036711-09, R01 NS037167, R01 NS37167; PHS HHS: HHSN268200782096C; Telethon: GTB07001

    BMC medical genetics 2009;10;98

  • Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome.

    Barbe L, Lundberg E, Oksvold P, Stenius A, Lewin E, Björling E, Asplund A, Pontén F, Brismar H, Uhlén M and Andersson-Svahn H

    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2008;7;3;499-508

  • A novel AAK1 splice variant functions at multiple steps of the endocytic pathway.

    Henderson DM and Conner SD

    Department of Genetics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

    Phosphorylation is a critical step in regulating receptor transport through the endocytic pathway. AAK1 is a serine/threonine kinase that is thought to coordinate the recruitment of AP-2 to receptors containing tyrosine-based internalization motifs by phosphorylating the micro2 subunit. Here we have identified a long form of AAK1 (AAK1L) that contains an extended C-terminus that encodes an additional clathrin-binding domain (CBD2) consisting of multiple low-affinity interaction motifs. Protein interaction studies demonstrate that AAK1L CBD2 directly binds clathrin. However, in vitro kinase assays reveal little difference between AAK1 isoforms in their basal or clathrin-stimulated kinase activity toward the AP-2 micro2 subunit. However, overexpression of AAK1L CBD2 impairs transferrin endocytosis, confirming an endocytic role for AAK1. Surprisingly, CBD2 overexpression or AAK1 depletion by RNA interference significantly impairs transferrin recycling from the early/sorting endosome. These observations suggest that AAK1 functions at multiple steps of the endosomal pathway by regulating transferrin internalization and its rapid recycling back to the plasma membrane from early/sorting endosome.

    Molecular biology of the cell 2007;18;7;2698-706

  • Endocytic Ark/Prk kinases play a critical role in adriamycin resistance in both yeast and mammalian cells.

    Takahashi T, Furuchi T and Naganuma A

    Laboratory of Molecular and Biochemical Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

    To elucidate the mechanism of acquired resistance to Adriamycin, we searched for genes that, when overexpressed, render Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to Adriamycin. We identified AKL1, a gene of which the function is unknown but is considered, nonetheless, to be a member of the Ark/Prk kinase family, which is involved in the regulation of endocytosis, on the basis of its deduced amino acid sequence. Among tested members of the Ark/Prk kinase family (Ark1, Prk1, and Akl1), overexpressed Prk1 also conferred Adriamycin resistance on yeast cells. Prk1 is known to dissociate the Sla1/Pan1/End3 complex, which is involved in endocytosis, by phosphorylating Sla1 and Pan1 in the complex. We showed that Akl1 promotes phosphorylation of Pan1 in this complex and reduces the endocytic ability of the cell, as does Prk1. Sla1- and End3-defective yeast cells were also resistant to Adriamycin and overexpression of Akl1 in these defective cells did not increase the degree of Adriamycin resistance, suggesting that Akl1 might reduce Adriamycin toxicity by reducing the endocytic ability of cells via a mechanism that involves the Sla1/Pan1/End3 complex and the phosphorylation of Pan1. We also found that HEK293 cells that overexpressed AAK1, a member of the human Ark/Prk family, were Adriamycin resistant. Our findings suggest that endocytosis might be involved in the mechanism of Adriamycin toxicity in yeast and human cells.

    Cancer research 2006;66;24;11932-7

  • A probability-based approach for high-throughput protein phosphorylation analysis and site localization.

    Beausoleil SA, Villén J, Gerber SA, Rush J and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    Data analysis and interpretation remain major logistical challenges when attempting to identify large numbers of protein phosphorylation sites by nanoscale reverse-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (Supplementary Figure 1 online). In this report we address challenges that are often only addressable by laborious manual validation, including data set error, data set sensitivity and phosphorylation site localization. We provide a large-scale phosphorylation data set with a measured error rate as determined by the target-decoy approach, we demonstrate an approach to maximize data set sensitivity by efficiently distracting incorrect peptide spectral matches (PSMs), and we present a probability-based score, the Ascore, that measures the probability of correct phosphorylation site localization based on the presence and intensity of site-determining ions in MS/MS spectra. We applied our methods in a fully automated fashion to nocodazole-arrested HeLa cell lysate where we identified 1,761 nonredundant phosphorylation sites from 491 proteins with a peptide false-positive rate of 1.3%.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG03456; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945

    Nature biotechnology 2006;24;10;1285-92

  • Role of the AP2 beta-appendage hub in recruiting partners for clathrin-coated vesicle assembly.

    Schmid EM, Ford MG, Burtey A, Praefcke GJ, Peak-Chew SY, Mills IG, Benmerah A and McMahon HT

    Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

    Adaptor protein complex 2 alpha and beta-appendage domains act as hubs for the assembly of accessory protein networks involved in clathrin-coated vesicle formation. We identify a large repertoire of beta-appendage interactors by mass spectrometry. These interact with two distinct ligand interaction sites on the beta-appendage (the "top" and "side" sites) that bind motifs distinct from those previously identified on the alpha-appendage. We solved the structure of the beta-appendage with a peptide from the accessory protein Eps15 bound to the side site and with a peptide from the accessory cargo adaptor beta-arrestin bound to the top site. We show that accessory proteins can bind simultaneously to multiple appendages, allowing these to cooperate in enhancing ligand avidities that appear to be irreversible in vitro. We now propose that clathrin, which interacts with the beta-appendage, achieves ligand displacement in vivo by self-polymerisation as the coated pit matures. This changes the interaction environment from liquid-phase, affinity-driven interactions, to interactions driven by solid-phase stability ("matricity"). Accessory proteins that interact solely with the appendages are thereby displaced to areas of the coated pit where clathrin has not yet polymerised. However, proteins such as beta-arrestin (non-visual arrestin) and autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein, which have direct clathrin interactions, will remain in the coated pits with their interacting receptors.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0100100, MC_U105178795

    PLoS biology 2006;4;9;e262

  • Unlocking the mysteries of Na+-K+-ATPase endocytosis: phosphorylation is the key.

    Collawn JF

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK 60065

    American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology 2006;35;1;1-2

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T, Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • Global phosphoproteome of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Kim JE, Tannenbaum SR and White FM

    Biological Engineering Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massassachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

    Phosphorylation events in cellular signaling cascades triggered by a variety of cellular stimuli modulate protein function, leading to diverse cellular outcomes including cell division, growth, death, and differentiation. Abnormal regulation of protein phosphorylation due to mutation or overexpression of signaling proteins often results in various disease states. We provide here a list of protein phosphorylation sites identified from HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) combined with liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. In this study, proteins extracted from HT-29 whole cell lysates were digested with trypsin and carboxylate groups on the resulting peptides were converted to methyl esters. Derivatized phosphorylated peptides were enriched using Fe(3+)-chelated metal affinity resin. Phosphopeptides retained by IMAC were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed by electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometry. We identified 238 phosphorylation sites, 213 of which could be conclusively localized to a single residue, from 116 proteins by searching MS/MS spectra against the human protein database using MASCOT. Peptide identification and phosphorylation site assignment were confirmed by manual inspection of the MS/MS spectra. Many of the phosphorylation sites identified in our results have not been described previously in the scientific literature. We attempted to ascribe functionality to the sites identified in this work by searching for potential kinase motifs with Scansite (http://scansite.mit.edu) and obtaining information on kinase substrate selectivity from Pattern Explorer (http://scansite.mit.edu/pe). The list of protein phosphorylation sites identified in the present experiment provides broad information on phosphorylated proteins under normal (asynchronous) cell culture conditions. Sites identified in this study may be utilized as surrogate bio-markers to assess the activity of selected kinases and signaling pathways from different cell states and exogenous stimuli.

    Funded by: NIEHS NIH HHS: P30 ES 002109, P30 ES002109; NIGMS NIH HHS: 1P50 GM 68762-01

    Journal of proteome research 2005;4;4;1339-46

  • Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4.

    Hillier LW, Graves TA, Fulton RS, Fulton LA, Pepin KH, Minx P, Wagner-McPherson C, Layman D, Wylie K, Sekhon M, Becker MC, Fewell GA, Delehaunty KD, Miner TL, Nash WE, Kremitzki C, Oddy L, Du H, Sun H, Bradshaw-Cordum H, Ali J, Carter J, Cordes M, Harris A, Isak A, van Brunt A, Nguyen C, Du F, Courtney L, Kalicki J, Ozersky P, Abbott S, Armstrong J, Belter EA, Caruso L, Cedroni M, Cotton M, Davidson T, Desai A, Elliott G, Erb T, Fronick C, Gaige T, Haakenson W, Haglund K, Holmes A, Harkins R, Kim K, Kruchowski SS, Strong CM, Grewal N, Goyea E, Hou S, Levy A, Martinka S, Mead K, McLellan MD, Meyer R, Randall-Maher J, Tomlinson C, Dauphin-Kohlberg S, Kozlowicz-Reilly A, Shah N, Swearengen-Shahid S, Snider J, Strong JT, Thompson J, Yoakum M, Leonard S, Pearman C, Trani L, Radionenko M, Waligorski JE, Wang C, Rock SM, Tin-Wollam AM, Maupin R, Latreille P, Wendl MC, Yang SP, Pohl C, Wallis JW, Spieth J, Bieri TA, Berkowicz N, Nelson JO, Osborne J, Ding L, Meyer R, Sabo A, Shotland Y, Sinha P, Wohldmann PE, Cook LL, Hickenbotham MT, Eldred J, Williams D, Jones TA, She X, Ciccarelli FD, Izaurralde E, Taylor J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Cox DR, Huang X, McPherson JD, Mardis ER, Clifton SW, Warren WC, Chinwalla AT, Eddy SR, Marra MA, Ovcharenko I, Furey TS, Miller W, Eichler EE, Bork P, Suyama M, Torrents D, Waterston RH and Wilson RK

    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA.

    Human chromosome 2 is unique to the human lineage in being the product of a head-to-head fusion of two intermediate-sized ancestral chromosomes. Chromosome 4 has received attention primarily related to the search for the Huntington's disease gene, but also for genes associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, polycystic kidney disease and a form of muscular dystrophy. Here we present approximately 237 million base pairs of sequence for chromosome 2, and 186 million base pairs for chromosome 4, representing more than 99.6% of their euchromatic sequences. Our initial analyses have identified 1,346 protein-coding genes and 1,239 pseudogenes on chromosome 2, and 796 protein-coding genes and 778 pseudogenes on chromosome 4. Extensive analyses confirm the underlying construction of the sequence, and expand our understanding of the structure and evolution of mammalian chromosomes, including gene deserts, segmental duplications and highly variant regions.

    Nature 2005;434;7034;724-31

  • Dual engagement regulation of protein interactions with the AP-2 adaptor alpha appendage.

    Mishra SK, Hawryluk MJ, Brett TJ, Keyel PA, Dupin AL, Jha A, Heuser JE, Fremont DH and Traub LM

    Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261, USA.

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis depends upon the coordinated assembly of a large number of discrete clathrin coat components to couple cargo selection with rapid internalization from the cell surface. Accordingly, the heterotetrameric AP-2 adaptor complex binds not only to clathrin and select cargo molecules, but also to an extensive family of endocytic accessory factors and alternate sorting adaptors. Physical associations between accessory proteins and AP-2 occur primarily through DP(F/W) or FXDXF motifs, which engage an interaction surface positioned on the C-terminal platform subdomain of the independently folded alpha subunit appendage. Here, we find that the WXX(F/W)X(D/E) interaction motif found in several endocytic proteins, including synaptojanin 1, stonin 2, AAK1, GAK, and NECAP1, binds a second interaction site on the bilobal alpha appendage, located on the N-terminal beta sandwich subdomain. Both alpha appendage binding sites can be engaged synchronously, and our data reveal that varied assemblies of interaction motifs with different affinities for two sites upon the alpha appendage can provide a mechanism for temporal ordering of endocytic accessory proteins during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: 5T32 DK061296-02, R01 DK53249; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM62414

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2004;279;44;46191-203

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.

    Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, Elias JE, Villén J, Li J, Cohn MA, Cantley LC and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Determining the site of a regulatory phosphorylation event is often essential for elucidating specific kinase-substrate relationships, providing a handle for understanding essential signaling pathways and ultimately allowing insights into numerous disease pathologies. Despite intense research efforts to elucidate mechanisms of protein phosphorylation regulation, efficient, large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites remains an unsolved problem. In this report we describe an application of existing technology for the isolation and identification of phosphorylation sites. By using a strategy based on strong cation exchange chromatography, phosphopeptides were enriched from the nuclear fraction of HeLa cell lysate. From 967 proteins, 2,002 phosphorylation sites were determined by tandem MS. This unprecedented large collection of sites permitted a detailed accounting of known and unknown kinase motifs and substrates.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041, K22 HG000041, T32 HG000041; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945, GMS6203, R01 GM056203, R01 GM067945

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;33;12130-5

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • AAK1-mediated micro2 phosphorylation is stimulated by assembled clathrin.

    Conner SD, Schröter T and Schmid SL

    The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

    AAK1, the adaptor-associated kinase 1, phosphorylates the micro2 subunit of AP2 and regulates the recruitment of AP2 to tyrosine-based internalization motifs found on membrane-bound receptors. AAK1 overexpression specifically inhibits the AP2-dependent internalization of transferrin receptor and LDL-receptor related protein by functionally sequestering AP2 (Conner and Schmid. J Cell Biol 2003; 162: 773). However, while AAK1 stably associates with AP2 and specifically targets the micro2 subunit in vitro, micro2 phosphorylation in vivo was not altered by overexpression of either wild-type or kinase-inactive AAK1. These results suggested that AAK1 might be tightly regulated in the cell. Here, we report that AAK1 is an atypical kinase that is rate limited by its stable association with AP2 and that clathrin stimulates micro2 phosphorylation by AAK1. Efficient stimulation of AAK1 by clathrin involves multiple interactions between several domains on AAK1 and both heavy and light chains on clathrin. Importantly, incubation of AAK1 with clathrin cages resulted in even greater stimulation when compared to that of unassembled clathrin triskelia. Collectively, our observations indicate that clathrin function is not limited to structural and/or mechanical roles in endocytic vesicle formation: the stimulatory effects of clathrin on AAK1 activity argue that it also plays a regulatory role by modulating the activity of AP2 complexes through activation of AAK1. We suggest a model in which AAK1 is specifically activated in coated pits to enhance cargo recruitment and efficient internalization.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 20632-01; NIMH NIH HHS: R37 MH 61345

    Traffic (Copenhagen, Denmark) 2003;4;12;885-90

  • Differential requirements for AP-2 in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Conner SD and Schmid SL

    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

    AP-2 complexes are key components in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). They trigger clathrin assembly, interact directly with cargo molecules, and recruit a number of endocytic accessory factors. Adaptor-associated kinase (AAK1), an AP-2 binding partner, modulates AP-2 function by phosphorylating its mu2 subunit. Here, we examined the effects of adenoviral-mediated overexpression of WT AAK1, kinase-dead, and truncation mutants in HeLa cells, and show that AAK1 also regulates AP-2 function in vivo. WT AAK1 overexpression selectively blocks transferrin (Tfn) receptor and LRP endocytosis. Inhibition was kinase independent, but required the full-length AAK1 as truncation mutants were not inhibitory. Although changes in mu2 phosphorylation were not detected, AAK1 overexpression significantly decreased the phosphorylation of large adaptin subunits and the normally punctate AP-2 distribution was dispersed, suggesting that AAK1 overexpression inhibited Tfn endocytosis by functionally sequestering AP-2. Surprisingly, clathrin distribution and EGF uptake were unaffected by AAK1 overexpression. Thus, AP-2 may not be stoichiometrically required for coat assembly, and may have a more cargo-selective function in CME than previously thought.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: F32 GM020632, GM20632-01; NIMH NIH HHS: R37 MH061345, R37-MH61345

    The Journal of cell biology 2003;162;5;773-9

  • The protein kinase complement of the human genome.

    Manning G, Whyte DB, Martinez R, Hunter T and Sudarsanam S

    SUGEN Inc., 230 East Grand Avenue, South San Francisco, CA 94080, USA. gerard-manning@sugen.com

    We have catalogued the protein kinase complement of the human genome (the "kinome") using public and proprietary genomic, complementary DNA, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences. This provides a starting point for comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylation in normal and disease states, as well as a detailed view of the current state of human genome analysis through a focus on one large gene family. We identify 518 putative protein kinase genes, of which 71 have not previously been reported or described as kinases, and we extend or correct the protein sequences of 56 more kinases. New genes include members of well-studied families as well as previously unidentified families, some of which are conserved in model organisms. Classification and comparison with model organism kinomes identified orthologous groups and highlighted expansions specific to human and other lineages. We also identified 106 protein kinase pseudogenes. Chromosomal mapping revealed several small clusters of kinase genes and revealed that 244 kinases map to disease loci or cancer amplicons.

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 2002;298;5600;1912-34

  • Identification of an adaptor-associated kinase, AAK1, as a regulator of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Conner SD and Schmid SL

    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

    The mu 2 subunit of the AP2 complex is known to be phosphorylated in vitro by a copurifying kinase, and it has been demonstrated recently that mu 2 phosphorylation is required for transferrin endocytosis (Olusanya, O., P.D. Andrews, J.R. Swedlow, and E. Smythe. 2001. Curr. Biol. 11:896-900). However, the identity of the endogenous kinase responsible for this phosphorylation is unknown. Here we identify and characterize a novel member of the Prk/Ark family of serine/threonine kinases, adaptor-associated kinase (AAK)1. We find that AAK1 copurifies with adaptor protein (AP)2 and that it directly binds the ear domain of alpha-adaptin in vivo and in vitro. In neuronal cells, AAK1 is enriched at presynaptic terminals, whereas in nonneuronal cells it colocalizes with clathrin and AP2 in clathrin-coated pits and at the leading edge of migrating cells. AAK1 specifically phosphorylates the mu subunit in vitro, and stage-specific assays for endocytosis show that mu phosphorylation by AAK1 results in a decrease in AP2-stimulated transferrin internalization. Together, these results provide strong evidence that AAK1 is the endogenous mu 2 kinase and plays a regulatory role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results also lend support to the idea that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is controlled by cycles of phosphorylation/desphosphorylation.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: F32 GM020632, GM20632-01; NIMH NIH HHS: R37 MH061345, R37-MH61345

    The Journal of cell biology 2002;156;5;921-9

  • Phosphorylation of the AP2 mu subunit by AAK1 mediates high affinity binding to membrane protein sorting signals.

    Ricotta D, Conner SD, Schmid SL, von Figura K and Honing S

    Institute for Biochemistry II, University of Göttingen, 37073 Göttingen, Germany.

    During receptor-mediated endocytosis, AP2 complexes act as a bridge between the cargo membrane proteins and the clathrin coat by binding to sorting signals via the mu 2 subunit and to clathrin via the beta subunit. Here we show that binding of AP2 to sorting signals in vitro is regulated by phosphorylation of the mu 2 subunit of AP2. Phosphorylation of mu 2 enhances the binding affinity of AP2 for sorting motifs as much as 25-fold compared with dephosphorylated AP2. The recognition of sorting signals was not affected by the phosphorylation status of the alpha or beta 2 subunit, suggesting that phosphorylation of mu 2 is critical for regulation of AP2 binding to sorting signals. Phosphorylation of mu 2 occurs at a single threonine residue (Thr-156) and is mediated by the newly discovered adaptor-associated kinase, AAK1, which copurifies with AP2. We propose that phosphorylation of the AP2 mu 2 subunit by AAK1 ensures high affinity binding of AP2 to sorting signals of cargo membrane proteins during the initial steps of receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: F32 GM020632, GM20632; NIMH NIH HHS: R37 MH061345, R37-MH61345

    The Journal of cell biology 2002;156;5;791-5

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XIV. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Kikuno R, Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    To extend our cDNA project for accumulating basic information on unidentified human genes, we newly determined the sequences of 100 cDNA clones from a set of size-fractionated human adult and fetal brain cDNA libraries, and predicted the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA1019 to KIAA1118. The sequencing of these clones revealed that the average size of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames were 5.0 kb and 2.6 kb (880 amino acid residues), respectively. Database search of the predicted amino acid sequences classified 58 predicted gene products into the five functional categories, such as cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility, nucleic acid management, protein management and cell division. It was also found that, for 34 gene products, homologues were detected in the databases, which were similar in sequence through almost the entire regions. The chromosomal locations of the genes were determined by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their mapping data were already available in the public databases. The expression profiles of all the genes among 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substania nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver were also examined by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;3;197-205

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

Cookies Policy | Terms and Conditions. This site is hosted by Edinburgh University and the Genes to Cognition Programme.