G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002023
Gene symbol
DYNC1LI1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
dynein, cytoplasmic 1, light intermediate chain 1
Orthologue
G00000774 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000144635 (Ensembl human gene)
51143 (Entrez Gene)
1180 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DYNC1LI1 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:18745 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9Y6G9 (UniProt)

Literature (12)

Pubmed - other

  • Rab11-FIP3 links the Rab11 GTPase and cytoplasmic dynein to mediate transport to the endosomal-recycling compartment.

    Horgan CP, Hanscom SR, Jolly RS, Futter CE and McCaffrey MW

    Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

    Several protein families control intracellular transport processes in eukaryotic cells. Here, we show that the Rab11 GTPase effector protein Rab11-FIP3 (henceforth, FIP3) directly interacts with the dynein light intermediate chain 1 (DLIC-1, gene symbol DYNC1LI1) subunit of the cytoplasmic dynein 1 motor protein complex. We show that Rab11a, FIP3 and DLIC-1 form a ternary complex and that DLIC-1 colocalises with endogenous FIP3 and Rab11a in A431 cells. We demonstrate that association between FIP3 and DLIC-1 at the cell periphery precedes minus-end-directed microtubule-based transport, that FIP3 recruits DLIC-1 onto membranes, and that knockdown of DLIC-1 inhibits pericentrosomal accumulation of key endosomal-recycling compartment (ERC) proteins. In addition, we demonstrate that expression of a DLIC-1-binding truncation mutant of FIP3 disrupts the ability of ERC proteins to accumulate pericentrosomally. On the basis of these and other data, we propose that FIP3 links the Rab11 GTPase and cytoplasmic dynein to mediate transport of material from peripheral sorting endosomes to the centrally located ERC.

    Funded by: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council: BB/D011841

    Journal of cell science 2010;123;Pt 2;181-91

  • Dynein light intermediate chain 1 is required for progress through the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Sivaram MV, Wadzinski TL, Redick SD, Manna T and Doxsey SJ

    Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.

    The spindle assembly checkpoint monitors microtubule attachment to kinetochores and tension across sister kinetochores to ensure accurate division of chromosomes between daughter cells. Cytoplasmic dynein functions in the checkpoint, apparently by moving critical checkpoint components off kinetochores. The dynein subunit required for this function is unknown. Here we show that human cells depleted of dynein light intermediate chain 1 (LIC1) delay in metaphase with increased interkinetochore distances; dynein remains intact, localised and functional. The checkpoint proteins Mad1/2 and Zw10 localise to kinetochores under full tension, whereas BubR1 is diminished at kinetochores. Metaphase delay and increased interkinetochore distances are suppressed by depletion of Mad1, Mad2 or BubR1 or by re-expression of wtLIC1 or a Cdk1 site phosphomimetic LIC1 mutant, but not Cdk1-phosphorylation-deficient LIC1. When the checkpoint is activated by microtubule depolymerisation, Mad1/2 and BubR1 localise to kinetochores. We conclude that a Cdk1 phosphorylated form of LIC1 is required to remove Mad1/2 and Zw10 but not BubR1 from kinetochores during spindle assembly checkpoint silencing.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA82834-01, P01 CA082834; NIAMS NIH HHS: T32 AR007572, T32 AR07572; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM51994, R01 GM051994, R56 GM051994

    The EMBO journal 2009;28;7;902-14

  • Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.

    Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, Macek B, Kumar C, Mortensen P and Mann M

    Center for Experimental BioInformatics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark.

    Cell signaling mechanisms often transmit information via posttranslational protein modifications, most importantly reversible protein phosphorylation. Here we develop and apply a general mass spectrometric technology for identification and quantitation of phosphorylation sites as a function of stimulus, time, and subcellular location. We have detected 6,600 phosphorylation sites on 2,244 proteins and have determined their temporal dynamics after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and recorded them in the Phosida database. Fourteen percent of phosphorylation sites are modulated at least 2-fold by EGF, and these were classified by their temporal profiles. Surprisingly, a majority of proteins contain multiple phosphorylation sites showing different kinetics, suggesting that they serve as platforms for integrating signals. In addition to protein kinase cascades, the targets of reversible phosphorylation include ubiquitin ligases, guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and at least 46 different transcriptional regulators. The dynamic phosphoproteome provides a missing link in a global, integrative view of cellular regulation.

    Cell 2006;127;3;635-48

  • Phosphoproteome analysis of the human mitotic spindle.

    Nousiainen M, Silljé HH, Sauer G, Nigg EA and Körner R

    Department of Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany.

    During cell division, the mitotic spindle segregates the sister chromatids into two nascent cells, such that each daughter cell inherits one complete set of chromosomes. Errors in spindle formation can result in both chromosome missegregation and cytokinesis defects and hence lead to genomic instability. To ensure the correct function of the spindle, the activity and localization of spindle associated proteins has to be tightly regulated in time and space. Reversible phosphorylation has been shown to be one of the key regulatory mechanisms for the organization of the mitotic spindle. The relatively low number of identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of spindle components, however, has hampered functional analysis of regulatory spindle networks. A more complete inventory of the phosphorylation sites of spindle-associated proteins would therefore constitute an important advance. Here, we describe the mass spectrometry-based identification of in vivo phosphorylation sites from purified human mitotic spindles. In total, 736 phosphorylation sites were identified, of which 312 could be attributed to known spindle proteins. Among these are phosphorylation sites that were previously shown to be important for the regulation of spindle-associated proteins. Importantly, this data set also comprises 279 novel phosphorylation sites of known spindle proteins for future functional studies. This inventory of spindle phosphorylation sites should thus make an important contribution to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation, function, and integrity of the mitotic spindle.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2006;103;14;5391-6

  • Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature.

    Pfister KK, Fisher EM, Gibbons IR, Hays TS, Holzbaur EL, McIntosh JR, Porter ME, Schroer TA, Vaughan KT, Witman GB, King SM and Vallee RB

    Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. kkp9w@virginia.edu

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: R01 GM030626, R01 GM060560, R01 GM060560-05

    The Journal of cell biology 2005;171;3;411-3

  • Phosphoproteomic analysis of the developing mouse brain.

    Ballif BA, Villén J, Beausoleil SA, Schwartz D and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Proper development of the mammalian brain requires the precise integration of numerous temporally and spatially regulated stimuli. Many of these signals transduce their cues via the reversible phosphorylation of downstream effector molecules. Neuronal stimuli acting in concert have the potential of generating enormous arrays of regulatory phosphoproteins. Toward the global profiling of phosphoproteins in the developing brain, we report here the use of a mass spectrometry-based methodology permitting the first proteomic-scale phosphorylation site analysis of primary animal tissue, identifying over 500 protein phosphorylation sites in the developing mouse brain.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2004;3;11;1093-101

  • Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.

    Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, Elias JE, Villén J, Li J, Cohn MA, Cantley LC and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Determining the site of a regulatory phosphorylation event is often essential for elucidating specific kinase-substrate relationships, providing a handle for understanding essential signaling pathways and ultimately allowing insights into numerous disease pathologies. Despite intense research efforts to elucidate mechanisms of protein phosphorylation regulation, efficient, large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites remains an unsolved problem. In this report we describe an application of existing technology for the isolation and identification of phosphorylation sites. By using a strategy based on strong cation exchange chromatography, phosphopeptides were enriched from the nuclear fraction of HeLa cell lysate. From 967 proteins, 2,002 phosphorylation sites were determined by tandem MS. This unprecedented large collection of sites permitted a detailed accounting of known and unknown kinase motifs and substrates.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041, K22 HG000041, T32 HG000041; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945, GMS6203, R01 GM056203, R01 GM067945

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;33;12130-5

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • The small GTPase Rab4A interacts with the central region of cytoplasmic dynein light intermediate chain-1.

    Bielli A, Thörnqvist PO, Hendrick AG, Finn R, Fitzgerald K and McCaffrey MW

    Cell & Molecular Biology Laboratory, University College Cork, Ireland.

    Rab4 belongs to the Rab family of small GTPases involved in the regulation of intracellular transport, and has been localized to early endosomes. We have employed the yeast two-hybrid system to identify proteins that specifically interact with Rab4AQ67L, a GTPase-deficient mutant form of Rab4A. Screening a mouse embryo cDNA library identified a clone (M449) that interacted with Rab4A in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Data base searches identified this clone as the mouse cytoplasmic dynein light intermediate chain-1 (LIC-1). Based on this finding, the full-length equivalent human cytoplasmic dynein LIC-1 was isolated by PCR. When Rab4A was overexpressed together with either M449 or dynein LIC-1 in HeLa cells, the proteins were found to colocalize in the perinuclear region. We characterize the localization of both overexpressed human dynein LIC-1 and the endogenous protein with respect to microtubules and show that it concentrates to the microtubule-organizing center and mitotic spindle. Additionally, GFPRab4A endosomes localize to microtubules and are redistributed by nocodazole treatment. This is the first described interaction between cytoplasmic dynein, a retrograde motor protein, and a Rab protein.

    Biochemical and biophysical research communications 2001;281;5;1141-53

  • Light intermediate chain 1 defines a functional subfraction of cytoplasmic dynein which binds to pericentrin.

    Tynan SH, Purohit A, Doxsey SJ and Vallee RB

    Department of Cell Biology and the Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts 01605, USA.

    The light intermediate chains (LICs) of cytoplasmic dynein consist of multiple isoforms, which undergo post-translational modification to produce a large number of species separable by two-dimensional electrophoresis and which we have proposed to represent at least two gene products. Recently, we demonstrated the first known function for the LICs: binding to the centrosomal protein, pericentrin, which represents a novel, non-dynactin-based cargo-binding mechanism. Here we report the cloning of rat LIC1, which is approximately 75% homologous to rat LIC2 and also contains a P-loop consensus sequence. We compared LIC1 and LIC2 for the ability to interact with pericentrin, and found that only LIC1 will bind. A functional P-loop sequence is not required for this interaction. We have mapped the interaction to the central region of both LIC1 and pericentrin. Using recombinant LICs, we found that they form homooligomers, but not heterooligomers, and exhibit mutually exclusive binding to the heavy chain. Additionally, overexpressed pericentrin is seen to interact with endogenous LIC1 exclusively. Together these results demonstrate the existence of two subclasses of cytoplasmic dynein: LIC1-containing dynein, and LIC2-containing dynein, only the former of which is involved in pericentrin association with dynein.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM47434, GM51994

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2000;275;42;32763-8

  • Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library.

    Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K, Suyama A and Sugano S

    International and Interdisciplinary Studies, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

    Using 'oligo-capped' mRNA [Maruyama, K., Sugano, S., 1994. Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides. Gene 138, 171-174], whose cap structure was replaced by a synthetic oligonucleotide, we constructed two types of cDNA library. One is a 'full length-enriched cDNA library' which has a high content of full-length cDNA clones and the other is a '5'-end-enriched cDNA library', which has a high content of cDNA clones with their mRNA start sites. The 5'-end-enriched library was constructed especially for isolating the mRNA start sites of long mRNAs. In order to characterize these libraries, we performed one-pass sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones from both libraries (84 clones for the full length-enriched cDNA library and 159 clones for the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library). The cDNA clones of the polypeptide chain elongation factor 1 alpha were most frequently (nine clones) isolated, and more than 80% of them (eight clones) contained the mRNA start site of the gene. Furthermore, about 80% of the cDNA clones of both libraries whose sequence matched with known genes had the known 5' ends or sequences upstream of the known 5' ends (28 out of 35 for the full length-enriched library and 51 out of 62 for the 5'-end-enriched library). The longest full-length clone of the full length-enriched cDNA library was about 3300 bp (among 28 clones). In contrast, seven clones (out of the 51 clones with the mRNA start sites) from the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library came from mRNAs whose length is more than 3500 bp. These cDNA libraries may be useful for generating 5' ESTs with the information of the mRNA start sites that are now scarce in the EST database.

    Gene 1997;200;1-2;149-56

  • Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides.

    Maruyama K and Sugano S

    Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan.

    We have devised a method to replace the cap structure of a mRNA with an oligoribonucleotide (r-oligo) to label the 5' end of eukaryotic mRNAs. The method consists of removing the cap with tobacco acid pyrophosphatase (TAP) and ligating r-oligos to decapped mRNAs with T4 RNA ligase. This reaction was made cap-specific by removing 5'-phosphates of non-capped RNAs with alkaline phosphatase prior to TAP treatment. Unlike the conventional methods that label the 5' end of cDNAs, this method specifically labels the capped end of the mRNAs with a synthetic r-oligo prior to first-strand cDNA synthesis. The 5' end of the mRNA was identified quite simply by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    Gene 1994;138;1-2;171-4

Gene lists (5)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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