G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002014
Gene symbol
DYNC1I1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
dynein, cytoplasmic 1, intermediate chain 1
Orthologue
G00000765 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000158560 (Ensembl human gene)
1780 (Entrez Gene)
1182 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DYNC1I1 (GeneCards)
Literature
603772 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:2963 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O14576 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • DNCIC1

Literature (19)

Pubmed - other

  • Functional interplay between LIS1, NDE1 and NDEL1 in dynein-dependent organelle positioning.

    Lam C, Vergnolle MA, Thorpe L, Woodman PG and Allan VJ

    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.

    LIS1, NDE1 and NDEL1 modulate cytoplasmic dynein function in several cellular contexts. However, evidence that they regulate dynein-dependent organelle positioning is limited. Here, we show that depletion of NDE1 or NDEL1 alone profoundly affected the organisation of the Golgi complex but did not cause it to disperse, and slightly affected the position of endocytic compartments. However, striking dispersal of organelles was observed when both NDE1 and NDEL1 were depleted. A substantial portion of NDE1 and NDEL1 is membrane associated, and depletion of these proteins led to complete loss of dynein from membranes. Knockdown of LIS1 also caused the Golgi complex to fragment and disperse throughout the cell, and caused endocytic compartments to relocalise to the periphery. Depletion of LIS1, which is primarily cytosolic, led to partial loss of membrane-associated dynein, without affecting NDE1 and NDEL1. These data suggest that NDE1 and NDEL1 act upstream of LIS1 in dynein recruitment, and/or activation, on the membrane. Consistent with this hypothesis, expression of exogenous NDE1 or NDEL1 rescued the effects of LIS1 depletion on Golgi organisation, whereas LIS1 was only partially effective at rescuing the loss of NDE1 and NDEL1.

    Funded by: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council: BB/C512929/1; Medical Research Council: G0600253, G0701140, G0900930

    Journal of cell science 2010;123;Pt 2;202-12

  • GSK-3beta-regulated interaction of BICD with dynein is involved in microtubule anchorage at centrosome.

    Fumoto K, Hoogenraad CC and Kikuchi A

    Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan.

    Microtubule arrays direct intracellular organization and define cellular polarity. Here, we show a novel function of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) in the organization of microtubule arrays through the interaction with Bicaudal-D (BICD). BICD is known to form a complex with dynein-dynactin and to function in the intracellular vesicle trafficking. Our data revealed that GSK-3beta is required for the binding of BICD to dynein but not to dynactin. Knockdown of GSK-3beta or BICD reduced centrosomally focused microtubules and induced the mislocalization of centrosomal proteins. The unfocused microtubules in GSK-3beta knockdown cells were rescued by the expression of the dynein intermediate chain-BICD fusion protein. Microtubule regrowth assays showed that GSK-3beta and BICD are required for the anchoring of microtubules to the centrosome. These results imply that GSK-3beta may function in transporting centrosomal proteins to the centrosome by stabilizing the BICD1 and dynein complex, resulting in the regulation of a focused microtubule organization.

    The EMBO journal 2006;25;24;5670-82

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T, Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature.

    Pfister KK, Fisher EM, Gibbons IR, Hays TS, Holzbaur EL, McIntosh JR, Porter ME, Schroer TA, Vaughan KT, Witman GB, King SM and Vallee RB

    Department of Cell Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. kkp9w@virginia.edu

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: R01 GM030626, R01 GM060560, R01 GM060560-05

    The Journal of cell biology 2005;171;3;411-3

  • Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network.

    Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, Hirozane-Kishikawa T, Dricot A, Li N, Berriz GF, Gibbons FD, Dreze M, Ayivi-Guedehoussou N, Klitgord N, Simon C, Boxem M, Milstein S, Rosenberg J, Goldberg DS, Zhang LV, Wong SL, Franklin G, Li S, Albala JS, Lim J, Fraughton C, Llamosas E, Cevik S, Bex C, Lamesch P, Sikorski RS, Vandenhaute J, Zoghbi HY, Smolyar A, Bosak S, Sequerra R, Doucette-Stamm L, Cusick ME, Hill DE, Roth FP and Vidal M

    Center for Cancer Systems Biology and Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    Systematic mapping of protein-protein interactions, or 'interactome' mapping, was initiated in model organisms, starting with defined biological processes and then expanding to the scale of the proteome. Although far from complete, such maps have revealed global topological and dynamic features of interactome networks that relate to known biological properties, suggesting that a human interactome map will provide insight into development and disease mechanisms at a systems level. Here we describe an initial version of a proteome-scale map of human binary protein-protein interactions. Using a stringent, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system, we tested pairwise interactions among the products of approximately 8,100 currently available Gateway-cloned open reading frames and detected approximately 2,800 interactions. This data set, called CCSB-HI1, has a verification rate of approximately 78% as revealed by an independent co-affinity purification assay, and correlates significantly with other biological attributes. The CCSB-HI1 data set increases by approximately 70% the set of available binary interactions within the tested space and reveals more than 300 new connections to over 100 disease-associated proteins. This work represents an important step towards a systematic and comprehensive human interactome project.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: R33 CA132073; NHGRI NIH HHS: P50 HG004233, R01 HG001715, RC4 HG006066, U01 HG001715; NHLBI NIH HHS: U01 HL098166

    Nature 2005;437;7062;1173-8

  • The dynein light chain Tctex-1 has a dynein-independent role in actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth.

    Chuang JZ, Yeh TY, Bollati F, Conde C, Canavosio F, Caceres A and Sung CH

    Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10012, USA.

    Coordinated microtubule and microfilament changes are essential for the morphological development of neurons; however, little is know about the underlying molecular machinery linking these two cytoskeletal systems. Similarly, the indispensable role of RhoGTPase family proteins has been demonstrated, but it is unknown how their activities are specifically regulated in different neurites. In this paper, we show that the cytoplasmic dynein light chain Tctex-1 plays a key role in multiple steps of hippocampal neuron development, including initial neurite sprouting, axon specification, and later dendritic elaboration. The neuritogenic effects elicited by Tctex-1 are independent from its cargo adaptor role for dynein motor transport. Finally, our data suggest that the selective high level of Tctex-1 at the growth cone of growing axons drives fast neurite extension by modulating actin dynamics and also Rac1 activity.

    Funded by: NEI NIH HHS: EY11307, R01 EY011307, R01 EY016805

    Developmental cell 2005;9;1;75-86

  • Sequence comparison of human and mouse genes reveals a homologous block structure in the promoter regions.

    Suzuki Y, Yamashita R, Shirota M, Sakakibara Y, Chiba J, Mizushima-Sugano J, Nakai K and Sugano S

    Human Genome Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan. ysuzuki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Comparative sequence analysis was carried out for the regions adjacent to experimentally validated transcriptional start sites (TSSs), using 3324 pairs of human and mouse genes. We aligned the upstream putative promoter sequences over the 1-kb proximal regions and found that the sequence conservation could not be further extended at, on average, 510 bp upstream positions of the TSSs. This discontinuous manner of the sequence conservation revealed a "block" structure in about one-third of the putative promoter regions. Consistently, we also observed that G+C content and CpG frequency were significantly different inside and outside the blocks. Within the blocks, the sequence identity was uniformly 65% regardless of their length. About 90% of the previously characterized transcription factor binding sites were located within those blocks. In 46% of the blocks, the 5' ends were bounded by interspersed repetitive elements, some of which may have nucleated the genomic rearrangements. The length of the blocks was shortest in the promoters of genes encoding transcription factors and of genes whose expression patterns are brain specific, which suggests that the evolutional diversifications in the transcriptional modulations should be the most marked in these populations of genes.

    Genome research 2004;14;9;1711-8

  • A direct interaction between cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin I may coordinate motor activity.

    Ligon LA, Tokito M, Finklestein JM, Grossman FE and Holzbaur EL

    Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6085, USA.

    Cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin I are both unidirectional intracellular motors. Dynein moves cargo toward the cell center, and kinesin moves cargo toward the cell periphery. There is growing evidence that bi-directional motility is regulated in the cell, potentially through direct interactions between oppositely oriented motors. We have identified a direct interaction between cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin I. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay and affinity chromatography, we demonstrate that the intermediate chain of dynein binds to kinesin light chains 1 and 2. The interaction is both direct and specific. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate an interaction between endogenous proteins in rat brain cytosol. Double-label immunocytochemistry reveals a partial co-localization of vesicle-associated motor proteins. Together these observations suggest that soluble motors can interact, potentially allowing kinesin I to actively localize dynein to cellular sites of function. There is also a vesicle population with both dynein and kinesin I bound that may be capable of bi-directional motility along cellular microtubules.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM48661

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2004;279;18;19201-8

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • The composition of Staufen-containing RNA granules from human cells indicates their role in the regulated transport and translation of messenger RNAs.

    Villacé P, Marión RM and Ortín J

    Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain.

    hStaufen is the human homolog of dmStaufen, a double-stranded (ds)RNA-binding protein involved in early development of the fly. hStaufen-containing complexes were purified by affinity chromatography from human cells transfected with a TAP-tagged hStaufen gene. These complexes showed a size >10 MDa. Untagged complexes with similar size were identified from differentiated human neuroblasts. The identity of proteins present in purified hStaufen complexes was determined by mass spectrometry and the presence of these proteins and other functionally related ones was verified by western blot. Ribosomes and proteins involved in the control of protein synthesis (PABP1 and FMRP) were present in purified hStaufen complexes, as well as elements of the cytoskeleton (tubulins, tau, actin and internexin), cytoskeleton control proteins (IQGAP1, cdc42 and rac1) and motor proteins (dynein, kinesin and myosin). In addition, proteins normally found in the nucleus, like nucleolin and RNA helicase A, were also found associated with cytosolic hStaufen complexes. The co-localization of these components with hStaufen granules in the dendrites of differentiated neuroblasts, determined by confocal immunofluorescence, validated their association in living cells. These results support the notion that the hStaufen-containing granules are structures essential in the localization and regulated translation of human mRNAs in vivo.

    Nucleic acids research 2004;32;8;2411-20

  • The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    Hillier LW, Fulton RS, Fulton LA, Graves TA, Pepin KH, Wagner-McPherson C, Layman D, Maas J, Jaeger S, Walker R, Wylie K, Sekhon M, Becker MC, O'Laughlin MD, Schaller ME, Fewell GA, Delehaunty KD, Miner TL, Nash WE, Cordes M, Du H, Sun H, Edwards J, Bradshaw-Cordum H, Ali J, Andrews S, Isak A, Vanbrunt A, Nguyen C, Du F, Lamar B, Courtney L, Kalicki J, Ozersky P, Bielicki L, Scott K, Holmes A, Harkins R, Harris A, Strong CM, Hou S, Tomlinson C, Dauphin-Kohlberg S, Kozlowicz-Reilly A, Leonard S, Rohlfing T, Rock SM, Tin-Wollam AM, Abbott A, Minx P, Maupin R, Strowmatt C, Latreille P, Miller N, Johnson D, Murray J, Woessner JP, Wendl MC, Yang SP, Schultz BR, Wallis JW, Spieth J, Bieri TA, Nelson JO, Berkowicz N, Wohldmann PE, Cook LL, Hickenbotham MT, Eldred J, Williams D, Bedell JA, Mardis ER, Clifton SW, Chissoe SL, Marra MA, Raymond C, Haugen E, Gillett W, Zhou Y, James R, Phelps K, Iadanoto S, Bubb K, Simms E, Levy R, Clendenning J, Kaul R, Kent WJ, Furey TS, Baertsch RA, Brent MR, Keibler E, Flicek P, Bork P, Suyama M, Bailey JA, Portnoy ME, Torrents D, Chinwalla AT, Gish WR, Eddy SR, McPherson JD, Olson MV, Eichler EE, Green ED, Waterston RH and Wilson RK

    Genome Sequencing Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8501, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA.

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame.

    Nature 2003;424;6945;157-64

  • Human chromosome 7: DNA sequence and biology.

    Scherer SW, Cheung J, MacDonald JR, Osborne LR, Nakabayashi K, Herbrick JA, Carson AR, Parker-Katiraee L, Skaug J, Khaja R, Zhang J, Hudek AK, Li M, Haddad M, Duggan GE, Fernandez BA, Kanematsu E, Gentles S, Christopoulos CC, Choufani S, Kwasnicka D, Zheng XH, Lai Z, Nusskern D, Zhang Q, Gu Z, Lu F, Zeesman S, Nowaczyk MJ, Teshima I, Chitayat D, Shuman C, Weksberg R, Zackai EH, Grebe TA, Cox SR, Kirkpatrick SJ, Rahman N, Friedman JM, Heng HH, Pelicci PG, Lo-Coco F, Belloni E, Shaffer LG, Pober B, Morton CC, Gusella JF, Bruns GA, Korf BR, Quade BJ, Ligon AH, Ferguson H, Higgins AW, Leach NT, Herrick SR, Lemyre E, Farra CG, Kim HG, Summers AM, Gripp KW, Roberts W, Szatmari P, Winsor EJ, Grzeschik KH, Teebi A, Minassian BA, Kere J, Armengol L, Pujana MA, Estivill X, Wilson MD, Koop BF, Tosi S, Moore GE, Boright AP, Zlotorynski E, Kerem B, Kroisel PM, Petek E, Oscier DG, Mould SJ, Döhner H, Döhner K, Rommens JM, Vincent JB, Venter JC, Li PW, Mural RJ, Adams MD and Tsui LC

    Department of Genetics and Genomic Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5G 1X8. steve@genet.sickkids.on.ca

    DNA sequence and annotation of the entire human chromosome 7, encompassing nearly 158 million nucleotides of DNA and 1917 gene structures, are presented. To generate a higher order description, additional structural features such as imprinted genes, fragile sites, and segmental duplications were integrated at the level of the DNA sequence with medical genetic data, including 440 chromosome rearrangement breakpoints associated with disease. This approach enabled the discovery of candidate genes for developmental diseases including autism.

    Funded by: Canadian Institutes of Health Research: 38103; NIGMS NIH HHS: P01 GM061354

    Science (New York, N.Y.) 2003;300;5620;767-72

  • The heavy chain of conventional kinesin interacts with the SNARE proteins SNAP25 and SNAP23.

    Diefenbach RJ, Diefenbach E, Douglas MW and Cunningham AL

    Centre For Virus Research, Westmead Millennium Institute, Westmead Hospital and The University of Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia. russell_diefenbach@wmi.usyd.edu.au

    Recent studies on the conventional motor protein kinesin have identified a putative cargo-binding domain (residues 827-906) within the heavy chain. To identify possible cargo proteins which bind to this kinesin domain, we employed a yeast two-hybrid assay. A human brain cDNA library was screened, using as bait residues 814-963 of human ubiquitous kinesin heavy chain. This screen initially identified synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25) as a kinesin-binding protein. Subsequently, synaptosome-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23), the nonneuronal homologue of SNAP25, was also confirmed to interact with kinesin. The sites of interaction, determined from in vivo and in vitro assays, are the N-terminus of SNAP25 (residues 1-84) and the cargo-binding domain of kinesin heavy chain (residues 814-907). Both regions are composed almost entirely of heptad repeats, suggesting the interaction between heavy chain and SNAP25 is that of a coiled-coil. The observation that SNAP23 also binds to residues 814-907 of heavy chain would indicate that the minimal kinesin-binding domain of SNAP23 and SNAP25 is most likely residues 45-84 (SNAP25 numbering), a heptad-repeat region in both proteins. The major binding site for kinesin light chain in kinesin heavy chain was mapped to residues 789-813 at the C-terminal end of the heavy chain stalk domain. Weak binding of light chain was also detected at the N-terminus of the heavy chain tail domain (residues 814-854). In support of separate binding sites on heavy chain for light chain and SNAPs, a complex of heavy and light chains was observed to interact with SNAP25 and SNAP23.

    Biochemistry 2002;41;50;14906-15

  • PLAC-24 is a cytoplasmic dynein-binding protein that is recruited to sites of cell-cell contact.

    Karki S, Ligon LA, DeSantis J, Tokito M and Holzbaur EL

    Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104-6085, USA.

    We screened for polypeptides that interact specifically with dynein and identified a novel 24-kDa protein (PLAC-24) that binds directly to dynein intermediate chain (DIC). PLAC-24 is not a dynactin subunit, and the binding of PLAC-24 to the dynein intermediate chain is independent of the association between dynein and dynactin. Immunocytochemistry using PLAC-24-specific polyclonal antibodies revealed a punctate perinuclear distribution of the polypeptide in fibroblasts and isolated epithelial cells. However, as epithelial cells in culture make contact with adjacent cells, PLAC-24 is specifically recruited to the cortex at sites of contact, where the protein colocalizes with components of the adherens junction. Disruption of the cellular cytoskeleton with latrunculin or nocodazole indicates that the localization of PLAC-24 to the cortex is dependent on intact actin filaments but not on microtubules. Overexpression of beta-catenin also leads to a loss of PLAC-24 from sites of cell-cell contact. On the basis of these data and the recent observation that cytoplasmic dynein is also localized to sites of cell-cell contact in epithelial cells, we propose that PLAC-24 is part of a multiprotein complex localized to sites of intercellular contact that may function to tether microtubule plus ends to the actin-rich cellular cortex.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM-48661, R01 GM048661

    Molecular biology of the cell 2002;13;5;1722-34

  • The 8-kDa dynein light chain binds to its targets via a conserved (K/R)XTQT motif.

    Lo KW, Naisbitt S, Fan JS, Sheng M and Zhang M

    Department of Biochemistry, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a large, multisubunit molecular motor that translocates cargoes toward the minus ends of microtubules. Proper functioning of the dynein motor requires precise assembly of its various subunits. Using purified recombinant proteins, we show that the highly conserved 8-kDa light chain (DLC8) binds to the intermediate chain of the dynein complex. The DLC8-binding region was mapped to a highly conserved 10-residue fragment (amino acid sequence SYSKETQTPL) C-terminal to the second alternative splicing site of dynein intermediate chain. Yeast two-hybrid screening using DLC8 as bait identified numerous additional DLC8-binding proteins. Biochemical and mutational analysis of selected DLC8-binding proteins revealed that DLC8 binds to a consensus sequence containing a (K/R)XTQT motif. The (K/R)XTQT motif interacts with the common target-accepting grooves of DLC8 dimer. The role of each conserved amino acid residue in this pentapeptide motif in supporting complex formation with DLC8 was systematically studied using site-directed mutagenesis.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2001;276;17;14059-66

  • Upregulation of the gene encoding a cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain in senescent human cells.

    Horikawa I, Parker ES, Solomon GG and Barrett JC

    Laboratory of Biosystems and Cancer, Cancer and Aging Section, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. horikawi@mail.nih.gov

    Normal human somatic cells, unlike cancer cells, stop dividing after a limited number of cell divisions through the process termed cellular senescence or replicative senescence, which functions as a tumor-suppressive mechanism and may be related to organismal aging. By means of the cDNA subtractive hybridization, we identified eight genes upregulated during normal chromosome 3-induced cellular senescence in a human renal cell carcinoma cell line. Among them is the DNCI1 gene encoding an intermediate chain 1 of the cytoplasmic dynein, a microtubule motor that plays a role in chromosome movement and organelle transport. The DNCI1 mRNA was also upregulated during in vitro aging of primary human fibroblasts. In contrast, other components of cytoplasmic dynein showed no significant change in mRNA expression during cellular aging. Cell growth arrest by serum starvation, contact inhibition, or gamma-irradiation did not induce the DNCI1 mRNA, suggesting its specific role in cellular senescence. The DNCI1 gene is on the long arm of chromosome 7 where tumor suppressor genes and a senescence-inducing gene for a group of immortal cell lines (complementation group D) are mapped. This is the first report that links a component of molecular motor complex to cellular senescence, providing a new insight into molecular mechanisms of cellular senescence.

    Journal of cellular biochemistry 2001;82;3;415-21

  • Cloning and characterization of two cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain genes in mouse and human.

    Crackower MA, Sinasac DS, Xia J, Motoyama J, Prochazka M, Rommens JM, Scherer SW and Tsui LC

    Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario, Canada.

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a large multisubunit microtubule-based motor protein, which mediates movement of numerous intracellular organelles. We report here the identification of the human homologue of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain 1 gene (DNCI1) located on human chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1. The mouse orthologue (Dnci1) was identified along with another highly related gene, Dnci2, and their RNA in situ expression patterns were examined during mouse embryogenesis. Dnci1 was found to have a highly restricted expression domain in the developing forebrain as well as the peripheral nervous system (PNS), while Dnci2 displayed a broad expression profile throughout the entire central nervous system and most of the PNS. A dynamic expression profile was also found for Dnci2 in the developing mouse limb bud. The data presented here provide a framework for the further analysis of the functional role of Dnci1 and Dnci2 in mouse and DNCI1 in human.

    Genomics 1999;55;3;257-67

  • The mouse t-complex-encoded protein Tctex-1 is a light chain of brain cytoplasmic dynein.

    King SM, Dillman JF, Benashski SE, Lye RJ, Patel-King RS and Pfister KK

    Department of Biochemistry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06032-3305, USA. king@panda.uchc.edu

    Mammalian brain cytoplasmic dynein contains three light chains of Mr = 8,000, 14,000, and 22,000 (King, S. M., Barbarese, E., Dillman, J. F., III, Patel-King, R. S., Carson, J. H., and Pfister, K. K. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 19358-19366). Peptide sequence data (16/16 residues correct) implicate the Mr = 14,000 polypeptide as Tctex-1, a protein encoded within the mouse t-complex. Tctex-1 cosediments with microtubules and is eluted with ATP or salt but not with GTP as expected for a dynein subunit. The ATP-eluted protein precisely cosediments with known cytoplasmic dynein proteins in sucrose density gradients. Tctex-1 also is immunoprecipitated from brain and other tissue homogenates by a monoclonal antibody raised against the 74-kDa cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain. Quantitative densitometry indicates that Tctex-1 is a stoichiometric component of the dynein complex. As Tctex-1 is a candidate for involvement in the transmission ratio distortion (meiotic drive) of mouse t-haplotypes, these results suggest that cytoplasmic dynein dysfunction may play an important role in non-mendelian chromosome segregation.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 51293; NINDS NIH HHS: NS 29996

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1996;271;50;32281-7

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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