G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001961
Gene symbol
EXOC6B (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
exocyst complex component 6B
Orthologue
G00000712 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000144036 (Ensembl human gene)
23233 (Entrez Gene)
1121 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
Literature
607880 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:17085 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9Y2D4 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • KIAA0919

Literature (8)

Pubmed - other

  • Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of a de-novo t(2p;7p) translocation involving TNS3 and EXOC6B genes in a boy with a complex syndromic phenotype.

    Borsani G, Piovani G, Zoppi N, Bertini V, Bini R, Notarangelo L and Barlati S

    Sezione di Biologia e Genetica, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Biotecnologie, Universita' di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. gborsani@med.unibs.it

    We describe a premature newborn child with left renal agenesis, right low functional kidney, altered chemical-clinical parameters, neutropenia, recurrent pulmonary infections, long bone diaphysis broadening, growth and developmental delay. Postnatal cytogenetic analysis revealed a 46,XY,t(2;7)(p13;p12) de-novo karyotype. The chromosome breakpoints were defined by FISH using BAC probes and initially restricted to about 123,000bp in 2p13 and delimited to 84,600bp in 7p12. Bioinformatic analysis of these genomic regions showed two genes that are involved in the rearrangement: exocyst C6B (EXOC6B) for chromosome 2 breakpoint and tensin3 (TNS3) for chromosome 7 breakpoint. A EXOC6B-TNS3 fusion transcript together with a reciprocal TNS3-EXOC6B chimeric RNA have been detected by RT-PCR performed on skin fibroblasts RNA of the proband. These data localize the chromosome 2 breakpoint within the first intron of EXOC6B, while the translocation event on chromosome 7 occurred in intron 15 of TNS3. We hypothesize that the phenotype observed in the patient results from one or several mechanisms including: haploinsufficiency of EXOC6B and TNS3 genes; a dominant negative effect exerted by the chimeric transcripts; a disregulation in the expression of other genes adjacent the breakpoints. Although no clear evidences exist supporting a role of any of the above mentioned mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the complex phenotype, immunofluorescence analysis of tensin1 in the patient's fibroblasts suggests that the TNS3 gene haploinsufficiency results in a reduced expression of tensin1. These cells may be therefore a model for understanding the role and the organization of the tensin protein family.

    European journal of medical genetics 2008;51;4;292-302

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Immunological characterization of exocyst complex subunits in cell differentiation.

    Wang S and Hsu SC

    Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA.

    We have generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three proteins sec6, sec15, and exo84. These proteins have been shown to be components of the exocyst complex, a macromolecule required for many biological processes such as kidney epithelial formation and neuronal development. These antibodies can detect the three proteins by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoprecipitation. Using these antibodies, we found that the three proteins have similar subcellular localization which changes upon cell differentiation. These three proteins also co-immunoprecipitate with each other. These results suggest that at least three exocyst subunits associate with each other in vivo and redistribute in response to cell differentiation. In the future, these antibodies should be useful in the cell biological and functional analysis of the exocyst complex under physiological and pathological conditions.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: NS38892

    Hybridoma and hybridomics 2003;22;3;159-64

  • The brain exocyst complex interacts with RalA in a GTP-dependent manner: identification of a novel mammalian Sec3 gene and a second Sec15 gene.

    Brymora A, Valova VA, Larsen MR, Roufogalis BD and Robinson PJ

    Children's Medical Research Institute, 214 Hawkesbury Road, Westmead NSW 2145, Australia.

    Ral is a small GTPase involved in critical cellular signaling pathways. The two isoforms, RalA and RalB, are widely distributed in different tissues, with RalA being enriched in brain. The best characterized RalA signaling pathways involve RalBP1 and phospholipase D. To investigate RalA signaling in neuronal cells we searched for RalA-binding proteins in brain. We found at least eight proteins that bound RalA in a GTP-dependent manner. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identified these as the components of the exocyst complex. The yeast exocyst is a regulator of polarized secretion, docking vesicles to regions of the plasma membrane involved in active exocytosis. We identified the human FLJ10893 protein as the mammalian homologue of the yeast exocyst protein Sec3p. The exocyst complex did not contain the previously identified exocyst component rSec15, but a new homologue of both yeast Sec15p and rSec15, called KIAA0919. Western blots confirmed that two rat exocyst proteins, rSec6 and rSec8, bound active RalA in nerve terminals, as did RalBP1. Phospholipase D bound RalA in a nucleotide-independent manner. This places the RalA signaling system in mammalian nerve terminals, where the exocyst may act as an effector for activated RalA in directing sites of exocytosis.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2001;276;32;29792-7

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XIII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Suyama M, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    As a part of our cDNA project for deducing the coding sequence of unidentified human genes, we newly determined the sequences of 100 cDNA clones from a set of size-fractionated human brain cDNA libraries, and predicted the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0919 to KIAA1018. The sequencing of these clones revealed that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames were 4.9 kb and 2.6 kb (882 amino acid residues), respectively. A computer search of the sequences against the public databases indicated that predicted coding sequences of 87 genes contained sequences similar to known genes, 53% of which (46 genes) were categorized as proteins relating to cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility and nucleic acid management. The chromosomal locations of the genes were determined by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their mapping data were already available in the public databases. The expression profiles of all the genes among 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substania nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver were also examined by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;1;63-70

  • Toward a complete human genome sequence.

    Sanger Center and Genome Sequencing Center

    Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK;

    We have begun a joint program as part of a coordinated international effort to determine a complete human genome sequence. Our strategy is to map large-insert bacterial clones and to sequence each clone by a random shotgun approach followed by directed finishing. As of September 1998, we have identified the map positions of bacterial clones covering approximately 860 Mb for sequencing and completed >98 Mb ( approximately 3.3%) of the human genome sequence. Our progress and sequencing data can be accessed via the World Wide Web (http://webace.sanger.ac.uk/HGP/ or http://genome.wustl.edu/gsc/).

    Genome research 1998;8;11;1097-108

  • Subunit structure of the mammalian exocyst complex.

    Kee Y, Yoo JS, Hazuka CD, Peterson KE, Hsu SC and Scheller RH

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford CA 94305-5428, USA.

    The exocyst is a protein complex required for the late stages of secretion in yeast. Unlike the SNAREs (SNAP receptors), important secretory proteins that are broadly distributed on the target membrane, the exocyst is specifically located at sites of vesicle fusion. We have isolated cDNAs encoding the rexo70, rsec5, and rsec15 subunits of the mammalian complex. The amino acid sequences encoded by these genes are between 21% and 24% identical to their yeast homologs. All three genes are broadly expressed and multiple transcripts are observed for rexo70 and rsec15. Characterization of cDNAs encoding the 84-kDa subunit of the mammalian complex revealed a novel protein. mAbs were generated to the mammalian rsec6 subunit of the exocyst complex. rsec6 immunoreactivity is found in a punctate distribution at terminals of PC12 cell processes at or near sites of granule exocytosis.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 1997;94;26;14438-43

Gene lists (5)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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