G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001868
Gene symbol
PPFIA4 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, f polypeptide (PTPRF), interacting protein (liprin), alpha 4
Orthologue
G00000619 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000042123 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000143847 (Ensembl human gene)
8497 (Entrez Gene)
1036 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
PPFIA4 (GeneCards)
Literature
603145 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:9248 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O75335 (UniProt)

Literature (12)

Pubmed - other

  • Follow-up of a major linkage peak on chromosome 1 reveals suggestive QTLs associated with essential hypertension: GenNet study.

    Ehret GB, O'Connor AA, Weder A, Cooper RS and Chakravarti A

    Center for Complex Diseases Genomics, McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

    Essential hypertension is a major cardiovascular risk factor and a large proportion of this risk is genetic. Identification of genomic regions consistently associated with hypertension has been difficult in association studies to date as this requires large sample sizes.We previously published a large genome-wide linkage scan in Americans of African (AA) and European (EA) descent in the GenNet Network of the Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP). A highly significant linkage peak was identified on chr1q spanning a region of 100 cM. In this study, we genotyped 1569 SNPs under this linkage peak in 2379 individuals to identify whether common genetic variants were associated with blood pressure (BP) at this locus.Our analysis, using two different family-based association tests, provides suggestive evidence (P< or =2 x 10(-5)) for a collection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BP. In EAs, using diastolic BP as a quantitative phenotype, three variants located in or near the GPA33, CD247, and F5 genes, emerge as our top hits; for systolic BP, variants in GPA33, CD247, and REN are our best findings. No variant in AAs came close to suggestive evidence after multiple-test corrections (P> or =8 x 10(-5)). In summary, we show that systematic follow-up of a linkage signal can help discover candidate variants for essential hypertension that require a follow-up in yet larger samples. The failure to identify common variants is either because of low statistical power or the existence of rare coding variants in specific families or both, which require additional studies to clarify.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: U01 HL054512-11

    European journal of human genetics : EJHG 2009;17;12;1650-7

  • Systematic identification of SH3 domain-mediated human protein-protein interactions by peptide array target screening.

    Wu C, Ma MH, Brown KR, Geisler M, Li L, Tzeng E, Jia CY, Jurisica I and Li SS

    Department of Biochemistry and the Siebens-Drake Research Institute, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

    Systematic identification of direct protein-protein interactions is often hampered by difficulties in expressing and purifying the corresponding full-length proteins. By taking advantage of the modular nature of many regulatory proteins, we attempted to simplify protein-protein interactions to the corresponding domain-ligand recognition and employed peptide arrays to identify such binding events. A group of 12 Src homology (SH) 3 domains from eight human proteins (Swiss-Prot ID: SRC, PLCG1, P85A, NCK1, GRB2, FYN, CRK) were used to screen a peptide target array composed of 1536 potential ligands, which led to the identification of 921 binary interactions between these proteins and 284 targets. To assess the efficiency of the peptide array target screening (PATS) method in identifying authentic protein-protein interactions, we examined a set of interactions mediated by the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain by coimmunoprecipitation and/or affinity pull-downs using full-length proteins and achieved a 75% success rate. Furthermore, we characterized a novel interaction between PLCgamma1 and hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 (HPK1) identified by PATS and demonstrated that the PLCgamma1 SH3 domain negatively regulated HPK1 kinase activity. Compared to protein interactions listed in the online predicted human interaction protein database (OPHID), the majority of interactions identified by PATS are novel, suggesting that, when extended to the large number of peptide interaction domains encoded by the human genome, PATS should aid in the mapping of the human interactome.

    Proteomics 2007;7;11;1775-85

  • A protein-protein interaction network for human inherited ataxias and disorders of Purkinje cell degeneration.

    Lim J, Hao T, Shaw C, Patel AJ, Szabó G, Rual JF, Fisk CJ, Li N, Smolyar A, Hill DE, Barabási AL, Vidal M and Zoghbi HY

    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

    Many human inherited neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by loss of balance due to cerebellar Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration. Although the disease-causing mutations have been identified for a number of these disorders, the normal functions of the proteins involved remain, in many cases, unknown. To gain insight into the function of proteins involved in PC degeneration, we developed an interaction network for 54 proteins involved in 23 inherited ataxias and expanded the network by incorporating literature-curated and evolutionarily conserved interactions. We identified 770 mostly novel protein-protein interactions using a stringent yeast two-hybrid screen; of 75 pairs tested, 83% of the interactions were verified in mammalian cells. Many ataxia-causing proteins share interacting partners, a subset of which have been found to modify neurodegeneration in animal models. This interactome thus provides a tool for understanding pathogenic mechanisms common for this class of neurodegenerative disorders and for identifying candidate genes for inherited ataxias.

    Funded by: NICHD NIH HHS: HD24064; NINDS NIH HHS: NS27699

    Cell 2006;125;4;801-14

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Identification and characterization of human PPFIA4 gene in silico.

    Katoh M and Katoh M

    M&M Medical BioInformatics, Narashino 275-0022, Japan.

    Human PPFIA1 (also known as LIP.1 or Liprin alpha1) gene, located within CCND1-FGF4-EMS1 amplicon at human chromosome 11q13.3, encodes KIF1A-binding protein, which is implicated in trafficking of LAR subfamily PTPases and AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Human PPFIA4 (AF034801) and rat Ppfia4 (AY057064) are 5'-truncated partial cDNAs, and the complete coding sequence of PPFIA4 ortholog of any species remained to be identified. Here, we determined the complete coding sequence of human PPFIA4 gene by using bioinformatics. Exons 1-12 of PPFIA4 gene were located within human genome sequence AC096632.3, while exons 11-29 within AL451082.6. PPFIA4-MYOG locus (human chromosome 1q32.1) was paralogous to PPFIA2-LIN7A-MYF5-MYF6 locus (12q21.31), which was also paralogous to PPFIA3-LIN7B locus (19q13.41). PPFIA4 (1186 aa) showed 70.9%, 67.1%, and 61.8% total-amino-acid identity with PPFIA2, PPFIA1, and PPFIA3, respectively. PPFIA family members consist of PFIH1, PFIH2, PFIH3, PFIH4 domains and three SAM (Sterile alpha motif) domains. C-terminal binding domain for GRIP proteins (VRTYSC motif) was present in PPFIA1, PPFIA2 and PPFIA3, but not in PPFIA4. Bipartite nuclear localization signal was included within PFIH4 domain. PFIH2 domain was identical to ERM or Smc domain. The region spanning PFIH2-PFIH3 domains is the binding domain for KIF1A. The region spanning SAM1-SAM3 domains is the binding domain for LAR subfamily PTPases and PPFIBP (Liprin beta) family proteins. This is the first report on comprehensive characterization of PPFIA4 belonging to the PPFIA family of kinesin-cargo linkers.

    International journal of molecular medicine 2003;12;6;1009-14

  • Yeast two-hybrid screens implicate DISC1 in brain development and function.

    Millar JK, Christie S and Porteous DJ

    Medical Genetics Section, Department of Medical Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, EH4 2XU, Edinburgh, UK. Kirsty.Millar@ed.ac.uk

    DISC1 is a candidate gene for involvement in the aetiology of major psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia. We report here the results of DISC1 yeast two-hybrid screens using human foetal and adult brain libraries. Twenty-one proteins from a variety of subcellular locations were identified, consistent with observations that DISC1 occupies multiple subcellular compartments. The cellular roles of the proteins identified implicate DISC1 in several aspects of central nervous system development and function, including gene transcription, mitochondrial function, modulation of the actin cytoskeleton, neuronal migration, glutamate transmission, and signal transduction. Intriguingly, mutations in one of the proteins identified, WKL1, have been previously suggested to underlie the aetiology of catatonic schizophrenia.

    Biochemical and biophysical research communications 2003;311;4;1019-25

  • Interaction of the ERC family of RIM-binding proteins with the liprin-alpha family of multidomain proteins.

    Ko J, Na M, Kim S, Lee JR and Kim E

    National Creative Research Initiative Center for Synaptogenesis and Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Korea.

    Liprin-alpha/SYD-2 is a family of multidomain proteins with four known isoforms. One of the reported functions of liprin-alpha is to regulate the development of presynaptic active zones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that liprin-alpha directly interacts with the ERC (ELKS-Rab6-interacting protein-CAST) family of proteins, members of which are known to bind RIMs, the active zone proteins that regulate neurotransmitter release. In vitro results indicate that ERC2/CAST, an active zone-specific isoform, interacts with all of the known isoforms of liprin-alpha and that liprin-alpha1 associates with both ERC2 and ERC1b, a splice variant of ERC1 that distributes to both cytosolic and active zone regions. ERC2 colocalizes with liprin-alpha1 in cultured neurons and forms a complex with liprin-alpha1 in brain. Liprin-alpha1, when expressed alone in cultured neurons, shows a partial synaptic localization. When coexpressed with ERC2, however, liprin-alpha1 is redistributed to synaptic sites. Moreover, roughly the first half of ERC2, which contains the liprin-alpha-binding region, is sufficient for the synaptic localization of liprin-alpha1 while the second half is not. These results suggest that the interaction between ERC2 and liprin-alpha may be involved in the presynaptic localization of liprin-alpha and the molecular organization of presynaptic active zones.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;43;42377-85

  • Interaction between liprin-alpha and GIT1 is required for AMPA receptor targeting.

    Ko J, Kim S, Valtschanoff JG, Shin H, Lee JR, Sheng M, Premont RT, Weinberg RJ and Kim E

    Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Korea.

    Liprin-alpha is a multidomain protein that interacts with the LAR family of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases and the GRIP/ABP family of AMPA receptor-interacting proteins. Previous studies have indicated that liprin-alpha regulates the development of presynaptic active zones and that the association of liprin-alpha with GRIP is required for postsynaptic targeting of AMPA receptors. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we report that liprin-alpha directly interacts with GIT1, a multidomain protein with GTPase-activating protein activity for the ADP-ribosylation factor family of small GTPases known to regulate protein trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton. Electron microscopic analysis indicates that GIT1 distributes to the region of postsynaptic density (PSD) as well as presynaptic active zones. GIT1 is enriched in PSD fractions and forms a complex with liprin-alpha, GRIP, and AMPA receptors in brain. Expression of dominant-negative constructs interfering with the GIT1-liprin-alpha interaction leads to a selective and marked reduction in the dendritic and surface clustering of AMPA receptors in cultured neurons. These results suggest that the GIT1-liprin-alpha interaction is required for AMPA receptor targeting and that GIT1 may play an important role in the organization of presynaptic and postsynaptic multiprotein complexes.

    The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience 2003;23;5;1667-77

  • Interaction between GRIP and liprin-alpha/SYD2 is required for AMPA receptor targeting.

    Wyszynski M, Kim E, Dunah AW, Passafaro M, Valtschanoff JG, Serra-Pagès C, Streuli M, Weinberg RJ and Sheng M

    Department of Neurobiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

    Interaction with the multi-PDZ protein GRIP is required for the synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We show that GRIP binds to the liprin-alpha/SYD2 family of proteins that interact with LAR receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (LAR-RPTPs) and that are implicated in presynaptic development. In neurons, liprin-alpha and LAR-RPTP are enriched at synapses and coimmunoprecipitate with GRIP and AMPA receptors. Dominant-negative constructs that interfere with the GRIP-liprin interaction disrupt the surface expression and dendritic clustering of AMPA receptors in cultured neurons. Thus, by mediating the targeting of liprin/GRIP-associated proteins, liprin-alpha is important for postsynaptic as well as presynaptic maturation.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA 55547; NINDS NIH HHS: NS35050

    Neuron 2002;34;1;39-52

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Suyama M, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    In this paper, we report the sequences of 100 cDNA clones newly determined from a set of size-fractionated human brain cDNA libraries and predict the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0819 to KIAA0918. These cDNA clones were selected on the basis of their coding potentials of large proteins (50 kDa and more) by using in vitro transcription/translation assays. The sequence data showed that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames are 4.4 kb and 2.5 kb (831 amino acid residues), respectively. Homology and motif/domain searches against the public databases indicated that the predicted coding sequences of 83 genes were similar to those of known genes, 59% of which (49 genes) were categorized as coding for proteins functionally related to cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility and nucleic acid management. The chromosomal locations and the expression profiles of all the genes were also examined. For 54 clones including brain-specific ones, the mRNA levels were further examined among 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, and fetal brain.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1998;5;6;355-64

  • Liprins, a family of LAR transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase-interacting proteins.

    Serra-Pagès C, Medley QG, Tang M, Hart A and Streuli M

    Division of Tumor Immunology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    LAR family transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatases function in axon guidance and mammary gland development. In cultured cells, LAR binds to the intracellular, coiled coil LAR-interacting protein at discrete ends of focal adhesions, implicating these proteins in the regulation of cell-matrix interactions. We describe seven LAR-interacting protein-like genes in humans and Caenorhabditis elegans that form the liprin gene family. Based on sequence similarities and binding characteristics, liprins are subdivided into alpha-type and beta-type liprins. The C-terminal, non-coiled coil regions of alpha-liprins bind to the membrane-distal phosphatase domains of LAR family members, as well as to the C-terminal, non-coiled coil region of beta-liprins. Both alpha- and beta-liprins homodimerize via their N-terminal, coiled coil regions. Liprins are thus multivalent proteins that potentially form complex structures. Some liprins have broad mRNA tissue distributions, whereas others are predominately expressed in the brain. Co-expression studies indicate that liprin-alpha2 alters LAR cellular localization and induces LAR clustering. We propose that liprins function to localize LAR family tyrosine phosphatases at specific sites on the plasma membrane, possibly regulating their interaction with the extracellular environment and their association with substrates.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA55547

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1998;273;25;15611-20

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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