G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001784
Gene symbol
RPS25 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ribosomal protein S25
Orthologue
G00000535 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000118181 (Ensembl human gene)
6230 (Entrez Gene)
954 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
RPS25 (GeneCards)
Literature
180465 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10413 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P62851 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • S25

Literature (19)

Pubmed - other

  • A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome.

    Stelzl U, Worm U, Lalowski M, Haenig C, Brembeck FH, Goehler H, Stroedicke M, Zenkner M, Schoenherr A, Koeppen S, Timm J, Mintzlaff S, Abraham C, Bock N, Kietzmann S, Goedde A, Toksöz E, Droege A, Krobitsch S, Korn B, Birchmeier W, Lehrach H and Wanker EE

    Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, 13092 Berlin-Buch, Germany.

    Protein-protein interaction maps provide a valuable framework for a better understanding of the functional organization of the proteome. To detect interacting pairs of human proteins systematically, a protein matrix of 4456 baits and 5632 preys was screened by automated yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction mating. We identified 3186 mostly novel interactions among 1705 proteins, resulting in a large, highly connected network. Independent pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated the overall quality of the Y2H interactions. Using topological and GO criteria, a scoring system was developed to define 911 high-confidence interactions among 401 proteins. Furthermore, the network was searched for interactions linking uncharacterized gene products and human disease proteins to regulatory cellular pathways. Two novel Axin-1 interactions were validated experimentally, characterizing ANP32A and CRMP1 as modulators of Wnt signaling. Systematic human protein interaction screens can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of protein function and cellular processes.

    Cell 2005;122;6;957-68

  • Mass spectrometric analysis of the human 40S ribosomal subunit: native and HCV IRES-bound complexes.

    Yu Y, Ji H, Doudna JA and Leary JA

    Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley 94720, USA.

    Hepatitis C virus uses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in the viral RNA to directly recruit human 40S ribosome subunits during cap-independent translation initiation. Although IRES-mediated translation initiation is not subject to many of the regulatory mechanisms that control cap-dependent translation initiation, it is unknown whether other noncanonical protein factors are involved in this process. Thus, a global protein composition analysis of native and IRES-bound 40S ribosomal complexes has been conducted to facilitate an understanding of the IRES ribosome recruitment mechanism. A combined top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry approach was used to identify both the proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in the native 40S subunit and the IRES recruited translation initiation complex. Thirty-one out of a possible 32 ribosomal proteins were identified by combining top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry techniques. Proteins were found to contain PTMs, including loss of methionine, acetylation, methylation, and disulfide bond formation. In addition to the 40S ribosomal proteins, RACK1 was consistently identified in the 40S fraction, indicating that this protein is associated with the 40S subunit. Similar methodology was then applied to the hepatitis C virus IRES-bound 40S complex. Two 40S ribosomal proteins, RS25 and RS29, were found to contain different PTMs than those in the native 40S subunit. In addition, RACK1, eukaryotic initiation factor 3 proteins and nucleolin were identified in the IRES-mediated translation initiation complex.

    Protein science : a publication of the Protein Society 2005;14;6;1438-46

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • A protein interaction framework for human mRNA degradation.

    Lehner B and Sanderson CM

    MRC Rosalind Franklin Centre for Genomics Research, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SB, United Kingdom.

    The degradation of mRNA is an important regulatory step in the control of gene expression. However, mammalian RNA decay pathways remain poorly characterized. To provide a framework for studying mammalian RNA decay, a two-hybrid protein interaction map was generated using 54 constructs from 38 human proteins predicted to function in mRNA decay. The results provide evidence for interactions between many different proteins required for mRNA decay. Of particular interest are interactions between the poly(A) ribonuclease and the exosome and between the Lsm complex, decapping factors, and 5'-->3' exonucleases. Moreover, multiple interactions connect 5'-->3' and 3'-->5' decay proteins to each other and to nonsense-mediated decay factors, providing the opportunity for coordination between decay pathways. The interaction network also predicts the internal organization of the exosome and Lsm complexes. Additional interactions connect mRNA decay factors to many novel proteins and to proteins required for other steps in gene expression. These results provide an experimental insight into the organization of proteins required for mRNA decay and their coupling to other cellular processes, and the physiological relevance of many of these interactions are supported by their evolutionary conservation. The interactions also provide a wealth of hypotheses to guide future research on mRNA degradation and demonstrate the power of exhaustive protein interaction mapping in aiding understanding of uncharacterized protein complexes and pathways.

    Genome research 2004;14;7;1315-23

  • The molecular mechanics of eukaryotic translation.

    Kapp LD and Lorsch JR

    Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2185, USA. lkapp@jhmi.edu

    Great advances have been made in the past three decades in understanding the molecular mechanics underlying protein synthesis in bacteria, but our understanding of the corresponding events in eukaryotic organisms is only beginning to catch up. In this review we describe the current state of our knowledge and ignorance of the molecular mechanics underlying eukaryotic translation. We discuss the mechanisms conserved across the three kingdoms of life as well as the important divergences that have taken place in the pathway.

    Annual review of biochemistry 2004;73;657-704

  • Transcript-selective translational silencing by gamma interferon is directed by a novel structural element in the ceruloplasmin mRNA 3' untranslated region.

    Sampath P, Mazumder B, Seshadri V and Fox PL

    Department of Cell Biology, The Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

    Transcript-selective translational control of eukaryotic gene expression is often directed by a structural element in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the mRNA. In the case of ceruloplasmin (Cp), induced synthesis of the protein by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in U937 monocytic cells is halted by a delayed translational silencing mechanism requiring the binding of a cytosolic inhibitor to the Cp 3'-UTR. Silencing requires the essential elements of mRNA circularization, i.e., eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, poly(A)-binding protein, and poly(A) tail. We here determined the minimal silencing element in the Cp 3'-UTR by progressive deletions from both termini. A minimal, 29-nucleotide (nt) element was determined by gel shift assay to be sufficient for maximal binding of the IFN-gamma-activated inhibitor of translation (GAIT), an as-yet-unidentified protein or complex. The interaction was shown to be functional by an in vitro translation assay in which the GAIT element was used as a decoy to overcome translational silencing. Mutation analysis showed that the GAIT element contained a 5-nt terminal loop, a weak 3-bp helix, an asymmetric internal bulge, and a proximal 6-bp helical stem. Two invariant loop residues essential for binding activity were identified. Ligation of the GAIT element immediately downstream of a luciferase reporter conferred the translational silencing response to the heterologous transcript in vitro and in vivo; a construct containing a nonbinding, mutated GAIT element was ineffective. Translational silencing of Cp, and possibly other transcripts, mediated by the GAIT element may contribute to the resolution of the local inflammatory response following cytokine activation of macrophages.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL29582, HL67725, P01 HL029582, R01 HL067725

    Molecular and cellular biology 2003;23;5;1509-19

  • The human ribosomal protein genes: sequencing and comparative analysis of 73 genes.

    Yoshihama M, Uechi T, Asakawa S, Kawasaki K, Kato S, Higa S, Maeda N, Minoshima S, Tanaka T, Shimizu N and Kenmochi N

    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan.

    The ribosome, as a catalyst for protein synthesis, is universal and essential for all organisms. Here we describe the structure of the genes encoding human ribosomal proteins (RPs) and compare this class of genes among several eukaryotes. Using genomic and full-length cDNA sequences, we characterized 73 RP genes and found that (1) transcription starts at a C residue within a characteristic oligopyrimidine tract; (2) the promoter region is GC rich, but often has a TATA box or similar sequence element; (3) the genes are small (4.4 kb), but have as many as 5.6 exons on average; (4) the initiator ATG is in the first or second exon and is within plus minus 5 bp of the first intron boundaries in about half of cases; and (5) 5'- and 3'-UTRs are significantly smaller (42 bp and 56 bp, respectively) than the genome average. Comparison of RP genes from humans, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed the coding sequences to be highly conserved (63% homology on average), although gene size and the number of exons vary. The positions of the introns are also conserved among these species as follows: 44% of human introns are present at the same position in either D. melanogaster or C. elegans, suggesting RP genes are highly suitable for studying the evolution of introns.

    Genome research 2002;12;3;379-90

  • Functional analysis of the human CDC5L complex and identification of its components by mass spectrometry.

    Ajuh P, Kuster B, Panov K, Zomerdijk JC, Mann M and Lamond AI

    Department of Biochemistry, The University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK.

    Recently, we identified proteins that co-purify with the human spliceosome using mass spectrometry. One of the identified proteins, CDC5L, corresponds to the human homologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC5(+) gene product. Here we show that CDC5L is part of a larger multiprotein complex in HeLa nuclear extract that incorporates into the spliceosome in an ATP-dependent step. We also show that this complex is required for the second catalytic step of pre-mRNA splicing. Immunodepletion of the CDC5L complex from HeLa nuclear extract inhibits the formation of pre-mRNA splicing products in vitro but does not prevent spliceosome assembly. The first catalytic step of pre-mRNA splicing is less affected by immunodepleting the complex. The purified CDC5L complex in HeLa nuclear extract restores pre-mRNA splicing activity when added to extracts that have been immunodepleted using anti-CDC5L antibodies. Using mass spectrometry and database searches, the major protein components of the CDC5L complex have been identified. This work reports a first purification and characterization of a functional, human non-snRNA spliceosome subunit containing CDC5L and at least five additional protein factors.

    The EMBO journal 2000;19;23;6569-81

  • Nuclear and nucleolar targeting of human ribosomal protein S25: common features shared with HIV-1 regulatory proteins.

    Kubota S, Copeland TD and Pomerantz RJ

    Center for Human Virology, Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA.

    The nuclear and nucleolar targeting properties of human ribosomal protein S25 (RPS25) were analysed by the expression of epitope-tagged RPS25 cDNAs in Cos-1 cells. The tagged RPS25 was localized to the cell nucleus, with a strong predominance in the nucleolus. At the amino terminus of RPS25, two stretches of highly basic residues juxtapose. This configuration shares common features with the nucleolar targeting signals (NOS) of lentiviral RNA-binding transactivators, including human immunodeficiency viruses' (HIV) Rev proteins. Deletion and site-directed mutational analyses demonstrated that the first NOS-like stretch is dispensable for both nuclear and nucleolar localization of RPS25, and that the nuclear targeting signal is located within the second NOS-like stretch. It has also been suggested that a set of continuous basic residues and the total number of basic residues should be required for nucleolar targeting. Signal-mediated nuclear/nucleolar targeting was further characterized by the construction and expression of a variety of chimeric constructs, utilizing three different backbones with RPS25 cDNA fragments. Immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated a 17 residue peptide of RPS25 as a potential nuclear/nucleolar targeting signal. The identified peptide signal may belong to a putative subclass of NOS, characterized by compact structure, together with lentiviral RNA-binding transactivators.

    Funded by: NIAID NIH HHS: AI36552

    Oncogene 1999;18;7;1503-14

  • A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes.

    Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S, Davis E, Goodman N, Hudson TJ, Tanaka T and Page DC

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kenmochi@med.u-ryuku.ac.jp

    We mapped 75 genes that collectively encode >90% of the proteins found in human ribosomes. Because localization of ribosomal protein genes (rp genes) is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes, multiple strategies were devised to identify PCR-detectable sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns. In some cases we exploited specific, pre-existing information about the intron/exon structure of a given human rp gene or its homolog in another vertebrate. When such information was unavailable, selection of PCR primer pairs was guided by general insights gleaned from analysis of all mammalian rp genes whose intron/exon structures have been published. For many genes, PCR amplification of introns was facilitated by use of YAC pool DNAs rather than total human genomic DNA as templates. We then assigned the rp gene STSs to individual human chromosomes by typing human-rodent hybrid cell lines. The genes were placed more precisely on the physical map of the human genome by typing of radiation hybrids or screening YAC libraries. Fifty-one previously unmapped rp genes were localized, and 24 previously reported rp gene localizations were confirmed, refined, or corrected. Though functionally related and coordinately expressed, the 75 mapped genes are widely dispersed: Both sex chromosomes and at least 20 of the 22 autosomes carry one or more rp genes. Chromosome 19, known to have a high gene density, contains an unusually large number of rp genes (12). This map provides a foundation for the study of the possible roles of ribosomal protein deficiencies in chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Genome research 1998;8;5;509-23

  • Characterization of the human small-ribosomal-subunit proteins by N-terminal and internal sequencing, and mass spectrometry.

    Vladimirov SN, Ivanov AV, Karpova GG, Musolyamov AK, Egorov TA, Thiede B, Wittmann-Liebold B and Otto A

    Novosibirsk Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation.

    Reverse-phase HPLC was used to fractionate 40S ribosomal proteins from human placenta. Application of a C4 reverse-phase column allowed us to obtain 27 well-resolved peaks. The protein composition of each chromatographic fraction was established by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. N-terminally blocked proteins were cleaved with endoproteinase Lys-C, and suitable peptides were sequenced. All sequences were compared with those of ribosomal proteins available from data bases. This allowed us to identify all proteins from the 40S human ribosomal subunit in the HPLC elution profile. By matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry the masses of the 40S proteins were determined and checked for the presence of post-translational modifications. For several proteins differences to the deduced sequences and the calculated masses were found to be due to post-translational modifications.

    European journal of biochemistry 1996;239;1;144-9

  • Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins.

    Wool IG, Chan YL and Glück A

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

    Mammalian (rat) ribosomes have 80 proteins; the sequence of amino acids in 75 have been determined. What has been learned of the structure of the rat ribosomal proteins is reviewed with particular attention to their evolution and to amino acid sequence motifs. The latter include: clusters of basic or acidic residues; sequence repeats or shared sequences; zinc finger domains; bZIP elements; and nuclear localization signals. The occurrence and the possible significance of phosphorylated residues and of ubiquitin extensions is noted. The characteristics of the mRNAs that encode the proteins are summarized. The relationship of the rat ribosomal proteins to the proteins in ribosomes from humans, yeast, archaebacteria, and Escherichia coli is collated.

    Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire 1995;73;11-12;933-47

  • Construction of a human full-length cDNA bank.

    Kato S, Sekine S, Oh SW, Kim NS, Umezawa Y, Abe N, Yokoyama-Kobayashi M and Aoki T

    Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Japan.

    We aimed to construct a full-length cDNA bank from an entire set of human genes and to analyze the function of a protein encoded by each cDNA. To achieve this purpose, a multifunctional phagemid shuttle vector, pKA1, was constructed for preparing a high-quality cDNA library composed of full-length cDNA clones which can be sequenced and expressed in vitro and in mammalian cells without subcloning the cDNA fragment into other vectors. Using this as a vector primer, we have prepared a prototype of the bank composed of full-length cDNAs encoding 236 human proteins whose amino acid sequences are identical or similar to known proteins. Most cDNAs contain a putative cap site sequence, some of which show a pyrimidine-rich conserved sequence exhibiting polymorphism. It was confirmed that the vector permits efficient in vitro translation, expression in mammalian cells and the preparation of nested deletion mutants.

    Gene 1994;150;2;243-50

  • Assignment of the human ribosomal protein S25 gene (RPS25) to chromosome 11q23.3 by sequence analysis of the marker D11S456.

    Imai T, Sudo K and Miwa T

    Department of Biochemistry, Cancer Institute, Tokyo, Japan.

    Genomics 1994;20;1;142-3

  • Fifty sequenced-tagged sites on human chromosome 11.

    Miwa T, Sudo K, Nakamura Y and Imai T

    Department of Biochemistry, Cancer Institute, Tokyo, Japan.

    Fifty novel sequenced-tagged sites (STSs) were identified from cosmid clones mapped to human chromosome 11. DNA sequences were determined for one or both cloning ends of 69 cosmid markers that had each been localized to 1 of 24 subchromosomal regions by means of hybridization to somatic cell hybrid panels. Proper primer sequences and appropriate conditions for a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were determined for each marker. Twenty-one of the cosmids were not suitable for generating STSs, mainly because both of their ends contained repetitive elements such as Alu and L1 sequences; however, some were inappropriate because the sizes of their PCR products from human DNA, used as template, were same as those from yeast DNA. Finally, 50 STSs were established from 48 clones: 20 were derived from markers localized on the short arm and 30 from the long arm. These STSs can serve as new reagents for investigating human DNA in somatic cell hybrids and for isolating yeast artificial chromosomes to anchor large DNA contigs and fine-scale physical maps of chromosome 11.

    Genomics 1993;17;1;211-4

  • Regulation of ribosomal protein S25 in HL60 cells isolated for resistance to adriamycin.

    Li M and Center MS

    Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506.

    The ribosomal protein S25 gene is highly overexpressed in HL60 cells isolated for resistance to adriamycin. In contrast there is no overexpression of 3 other ribosomal genes which code for proteins S14, S17 and S24. Studies with an antibody against a synthetic peptide of the S25 protein show that although the S25 gene is overexpressed in resistant cells there is no corresponding increase in the levels of S25 protein. These results suggest that the r-protein levels are highly regulated by translational controls or protein turnover.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA37585

    FEBS letters 1992;298;2-3;142-4

  • Cloning and sequencing a cDNA encoding human ribosomal protein S25.

    Li ML, Latoud C and Center MS

    Center for Basic Cancer Research, Division of Biology, Kansas State University, Manhattan 66506.

    A full-length cDNA clone has been isolated from a cDNA library prepared from mRNA of adriamycin-resistant human leukemia HL60 cells. The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA has been determined and the protein coded for by the gene identified. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 125 amino acids (aa) with a deduced Mr of 13750. The deduced aa sequence of this protein has 56% homology to yeast ribosomal protein S31. Western-blot analysis using antibodies directed against a synthetic peptide based on the deduced aa sequence identifies the gene product as the human ribosomal protein S25.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA37585

    Gene 1991;107;2;329-33

  • Ribosomal proteins S2, S6, S10, S14, S15 and S25 are localized on the surface of mammalian 40 S subunits and stabilize their conformation. A study with immobilized trypsin.

    Marion MJ and Marion C

    Laboratoire de Biologie et Technologie des Membranes, CNRS UM 24, Université Claude Bernard de Lyon, Villeurbanne, France.

    Trypsin immobilized on collagen membranes has been used to digest accessible ribosomal proteins of rat liver 40 S subunits. Six proteins (S2, S6, S10, S14, S15 and S25) have been found to be highly exposed on the surface of 40 S particles. They appear to be in close physical contact and localized in the same region of the subunit, most likely protruding at its surface. Electric birefringence reveals that digestion of these proteins results in unfolding of subunits: the birefringence of 40 S particles becomes negative, like that of RNA, the relaxation time undergoes a 15-fold decrease and the mechanism of orientation is drastically modified.

    FEBS letters 1988;232;2;281-5

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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