G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001719
Gene symbol
CYFIP2 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2
Orthologue
G00000470 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000055163 (Ensembl human gene)
26999 (Entrez Gene)
847 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
CYFIP2 (GeneCards)
Literature
606323 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:13760 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q96F07 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • PIR121

Literature (30)

Pubmed - other

  • Evaluation of candidate genes in a genome-wide association study of childhood asthma in Mexicans.

    Wu H, Romieu I, Shi M, Hancock DB, Li H, Sienra-Monge JJ, Chiu GY, Xu H, del Rio-Navarro BE and London SJ

    Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.

    Background: More than 200 asthma candidate genes have been examined in human association studies or identified with knockout mouse approaches. However, many have not been systematically replicated in human populations, especially those containing a large number of tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

    Objective: We comprehensively evaluated the association of previously implicated asthma candidate genes with childhood asthma in a Mexico City population.

    Methods: From the literature, we identified candidate genes with at least 1 positive report of association with asthma phenotypes in human subjects or implicated in asthma pathogenesis using knockout mouse experiments. We performed a genome-wide association study in 492 asthmatic children aged 5 to 17 years and both parents using the Illumina HumanHap 550v3 BeadChip. Separate candidate gene analyses were performed for 2933 autosomal SNPs in the 237 selected genes by using the log-linear method with a log-additive risk model.

    Results: Sixty-one of the 237 genes had at least 1 SNP with a P value of less than .05 for association with asthma. The 9 most significant results were observed for rs2241715 in the gene encoding TGF-beta1 (TGFB1; P = 3.3 x 10(-5)), rs13431828 and rs1041973 in the gene encoding IL-1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1; P = 2 x 10(-4) and 3.5 x 10(-4)), 5 SNPs in the gene encoding dipeptidyl-peptidase 10 (DPP10; P = 1.6 x 10(-4) to 4.5 x 10(-4)), and rs17599222 in the gene encoding cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2; P = 4.1 x 10(-4)). False discovery rates were less than 0.1 for all 9 SNPs. Multimarker analysis identified TGFB1, IL1RL1, the gene encoding IL-18 receptor 1 (IL18R1), and DPP10 as the genes most significantly associated with asthma.

    Conclusions: This comprehensive analysis of literature-based candidate genes suggests that SNPs in several candidate genes, including TGFB1, IL1RL1, IL18R1, and DPP10, might contribute to childhood asthma susceptibility in a Mexican population.

    Funded by: Intramural NIH HHS: Z01 ES025045-08, Z01 ES049019-12; NIEHS NIH HHS: Z01 ES049019

    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 2010;125;2;321-327.e13

  • Analyses of associations between three positionally cloned asthma candidate genes and asthma or asthma-related phenotypes in a Chinese population.

    Zhou H, Hong X, Jiang S, Dong H, Xu X and Xu X

    Program for Population Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. huanyuzhou@hrca.harvard.edu

    Background: Six asthma candidate genes, ADAM33, NPSR1, PHF11, DPP10, HLA-G, and CYFIP2, located at different chromosome regions have been positionally cloned following the reported linkage studies. For ADAM33, NPSR1, and CYFIP2, the associations with asthma or asthma-related phenotypes have been studied in East Asian populations such as Chinese and Japanese. However, for PHF11, DPP10, and HLA-G, none of the association studies have been conducted in Asian populations. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to test the associations between these three positionally cloned genes and asthma or asthma-related phenotypes in a Chinese population.

    Methods: Two, five, and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the identified top regions of PHF11, DPP10, and HLA-G, respectively, were genotyped in 1183 independent samples. The study samples were selected based on asthma affectation status and extreme values in at least one of the following three asthma-related phenotypes: total serum immunoglobulin E levels, bronchial responsiveness test, and skin prick test. Both single SNP and haplotype analyses were performed.

    Results: We found that DPP10 was significantly associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and BHR asthma after the adjustment for multiple testing; while the associations of PHF11 with positive skin reactions to antigens and the associations of HLA-G with BHR asthma were only nominally significant.

    Conclusion: Our study is the first one to provide additional evidence that supports the roles of DPP10 in influencing asthma or BHR in a Chinese population.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: R01 HL66385

    BMC medical genetics 2009;10;123

  • Analyses of associations with asthma in four asthma population samples from Canada and Australia.

    Daley D, Lemire M, Akhabir L, Chan-Yeung M, He JQ, McDonald T, Sandford A, Stefanowicz D, Tripp B, Zamar D, Bosse Y, Ferretti V, Montpetit A, Tessier MC, Becker A, Kozyrskyj AL, Beilby J, McCaskie PA, Musk B, Warrington N, James A, Laprise C, Palmer LJ, Paré PD and Hudson TJ

    James Hogg iCAPTURE Center, University of British Columbia (UBC), 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6, Canada.

    Asthma, atopy, and related phenotypes are heterogeneous complex traits, with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Extensive research has been conducted and over hundred genes have been associated with asthma and atopy phenotypes, but many of these findings have failed to replicate in subsequent studies. To separate true associations from false positives, candidate genes need to be examined in large well-characterized samples, using standardized designs (genotyping, phenotyping and analysis). In an attempt to replicate previous associations we amalgamated the power and resources of four studies and genotyped 5,565 individuals to conduct a genetic association study of 93 previously associated candidate genes for asthma and related phenotypes using the same set of 861 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a common genotyping platform, and relatively harmonized phenotypes. We tested for association between SNPs and the dichotomous outcomes of asthma, atopy, atopic asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness using a general allelic likelihood ratio test. No SNP in any gene reached significance levels that survived correction for all tested SNPs, phenotypes, and genes. Even after relaxing the usual stringent multiple testing corrections by performing a gene-based analysis (one gene at a time as if no other genes were typed) and by stratifying SNPs based on their prior evidence of association, no genes gave strong evidence of replication. There was weak evidence to implicate the following: IL13, IFNGR2, EDN1, and VDR in asthma; IL18, TBXA2R, IFNGR2, and VDR in atopy; TLR9, TBXA2R, VDR, NOD2, and STAT6 in airway hyperresponsiveness; TLR10, IFNGR2, STAT6, VDR, and NPSR1 in atopic asthma. Additionally we found an excess of SNPs with small effect sizes (OR < 1.4). The low rate of replication may be due to small effect size, differences in phenotypic definition, differential environmental effects, and/or genetic heterogeneity. To aid in future replication studies of asthma genes a comprehensive database was compiled and is available to the scientific community at http://genapha.icapture.ubc.ca/.

    Human genetics 2009;125;4;445-59

  • CYFIP2, a direct p53 target, is leptomycin-B sensitive.

    Jackson RS, Cho YJ, Stein S and Liang P

    Vanderbilt-Ingram Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-6840, USA.

    A number of target genes for the tumor suppressor, p53, have been identified, however, the mechanisms that contribute to p53-dependent apoptosis remain to be fully elucidated. In a comprehensive screen for p53 target genes, we have identified Cytoplasmic FMR Interacting Protein 2 (CYFIP2) as a p53-inducible gene. Here we show that the CYFIP2 promoter contains a p53-responsive element that confers p53 binding as well as transcriptional activation of a heterologous reporter. Inducible expression of CYFIP2 is sufficient for caspase activation and cellular apoptosis, reminiscent of p53 activation. Together, these results suggest that CYFIP2 is a direct p53 target gene that may be part of a redundant network of genes responsible for p53-dependent apoptosis. In addition, the sensitivity of CYFIP2 protein subcellular localization to Leptomycin-B, a CRM-1/Exportin inhibitor, suggests that the biological functions of CYFIP2 may extend from the cytoplasmic compartment into the nucleus of the cell.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA105024, R01 CA76960; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM08554-7

    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 2007;6;1;95-103

  • NESH (Abi-3) is present in the Abi/WAVE complex but does not promote c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation.

    Hirao N, Sato S, Gotoh T, Maruoka M, Suzuki J, Matsuda S, Shishido T and Tani K

    School of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392, Japan.

    Abl interactor (Abi) was identified as an Abl tyrosine kinase-binding protein and subsequently shown to be a component of the macromolecular Abi/WAVE complex, which is a key regulator of Rac-dependent actin polymerization. Previous studies showed that Abi-1 promotes c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of Mammalian Enabled (Mena) and WAVE2. In addition to Abi-1, mammals possess Abi-2 and NESH (Abi-3). In this study, we compared the three Abi proteins in terms of the promotion of c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation and the formation of Abi/WAVE complex. Although Abi-2, like Abi-1, promoted the c-Abl-mediated phosphorylation of Mena and WAVE2, NESH (Abi-3) had no such effect. This difference was likely due to their binding abilities as to c-Abl. Immunoprecipitation revealed that NESH (Abi-3) is present in the Abi/WAVE complex. Our results suggest that NESH (Abi-3), like Abi-1 and Abi-2, is a component of the Abi/WAVE complex, but likely plays a different role in the regulation of c-Abl.

    FEBS letters 2006;580;27;6464-70

  • Phosphorylation of WAVE1 regulates actin polymerization and dendritic spine morphology.

    Kim Y, Sung JY, Ceglia I, Lee KW, Ahn JH, Halford JM, Kim AM, Kwak SP, Park JB, Ho Ryu S, Schenck A, Bardoni B, Scott JD, Nairn AC and Greengard P

    Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10021, USA.

    WAVE1--the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)--family verprolin homologous protein 1--is a key regulator of actin-dependent morphological processes in mammals, through its ability to activate the actin-related protein (Arp2/3) complex. Here we show that WAVE1 is phosphorylated at multiple sites by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) both in vitro and in intact mouse neurons. Phosphorylation of WAVE1 by Cdk5 inhibits its ability to regulate Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerization. Loss of WAVE1 function in vivo or in cultured neurons results in a decrease in mature dendritic spines. Expression of a dephosphorylation-mimic mutant of WAVE1 reverses this loss of WAVE1 function in spine morphology, but expression of a phosphorylation-mimic mutant does not. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling reduces phosphorylation of the Cdk5 sites in WAVE1, and increases spine density in a WAVE1-dependent manner. Our data suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of WAVE1 in neurons has an important role in the formation of the filamentous actin cytoskeleton, and thus in the regulation of dendritic spine morphology.

    Funded by: NIDA NIH HHS: P01 DA010044

    Nature 2006;442;7104;814-7

  • The LIFEdb database in 2006.

    Mehrle A, Rosenfelder H, Schupp I, del Val C, Arlt D, Hahne F, Bechtel S, Simpson J, Hofmann O, Hide W, Glatting KH, Huber W, Pepperkok R, Poustka A and Wiemann S

    Division Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. a.mehrle@dkfz.de

    LIFEdb (http://www.LIFEdb.de) integrates data from large-scale functional genomics assays and manual cDNA annotation with bioinformatics gene expression and protein analysis. New features of LIFEdb include (i) an updated user interface with enhanced query capabilities, (ii) a configurable output table and the option to download search results in XML, (iii) the integration of data from cell-based screening assays addressing the influence of protein-overexpression on cell proliferation and (iv) the display of the relative expression ('Electronic Northern') of the genes under investigation using curated gene expression ontology information. LIFEdb enables researchers to systematically select and characterize genes and proteins of interest, and presents data and information via its user-friendly web-based interface.

    Nucleic acids research 2006;34;Database issue;D415-8

  • Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network.

    Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, Hirozane-Kishikawa T, Dricot A, Li N, Berriz GF, Gibbons FD, Dreze M, Ayivi-Guedehoussou N, Klitgord N, Simon C, Boxem M, Milstein S, Rosenberg J, Goldberg DS, Zhang LV, Wong SL, Franklin G, Li S, Albala JS, Lim J, Fraughton C, Llamosas E, Cevik S, Bex C, Lamesch P, Sikorski RS, Vandenhaute J, Zoghbi HY, Smolyar A, Bosak S, Sequerra R, Doucette-Stamm L, Cusick ME, Hill DE, Roth FP and Vidal M

    Center for Cancer Systems Biology and Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    Systematic mapping of protein-protein interactions, or 'interactome' mapping, was initiated in model organisms, starting with defined biological processes and then expanding to the scale of the proteome. Although far from complete, such maps have revealed global topological and dynamic features of interactome networks that relate to known biological properties, suggesting that a human interactome map will provide insight into development and disease mechanisms at a systems level. Here we describe an initial version of a proteome-scale map of human binary protein-protein interactions. Using a stringent, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system, we tested pairwise interactions among the products of approximately 8,100 currently available Gateway-cloned open reading frames and detected approximately 2,800 interactions. This data set, called CCSB-HI1, has a verification rate of approximately 78% as revealed by an independent co-affinity purification assay, and correlates significantly with other biological attributes. The CCSB-HI1 data set increases by approximately 70% the set of available binary interactions within the tested space and reveals more than 300 new connections to over 100 disease-associated proteins. This work represents an important step towards a systematic and comprehensive human interactome project.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: R33 CA132073; NHGRI NIH HHS: P50 HG004233, R01 HG001715, RC4 HG006066, U01 HG001715; NHLBI NIH HHS: U01 HL098166

    Nature 2005;437;7062;1173-8

  • WW domains provide a platform for the assembly of multiprotein networks.

    Ingham RJ, Colwill K, Howard C, Dettwiler S, Lim CS, Yu J, Hersi K, Raaijmakers J, Gish G, Mbamalu G, Taylor L, Yeung B, Vassilovski G, Amin M, Chen F, Matskova L, Winberg G, Ernberg I, Linding R, O'donnell P, Starostine A, Keller W, Metalnikov P, Stark C and Pawson T

    Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    WW domains are protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions through recognition of proline-rich peptide motifs and phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline sites. To pursue the functional properties of WW domains, we employed mass spectrometry to identify 148 proteins that associate with 10 human WW domains. Many of these proteins represent novel WW domain-binding partners and are components of multiprotein complexes involved in molecular processes, such as transcription, RNA processing, and cytoskeletal regulation. We validated one complex in detail, showing that WW domains of the AIP4 E3 protein-ubiquitin ligase bind directly to a PPXY motif in the p68 subunit of pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation factor Im in a manner that promotes p68 ubiquitylation. The tested WW domains fall into three broad groups on the basis of hierarchical clustering with respect to their associated proteins; each such cluster of bound proteins displayed a distinct set of WW domain-binding motifs. We also found that separate WW domains from the same protein or closely related proteins can have different specificities for protein ligands and also demonstrated that a single polypeptide can bind multiple classes of WW domains through separate proline-rich motifs. These data suggest that WW domains provide a versatile platform to link individual proteins into physiologically important networks.

    Molecular and cellular biology 2005;25;16;7092-106

  • Evolutionarily conserved human targets of adenosine to inosine RNA editing.

    Levanon EY, Hallegger M, Kinar Y, Shemesh R, Djinovic-Carugo K, Rechavi G, Jantsch MF and Eisenberg E

    Compugen Ltd 72 Pinchas Rosen St, Tel-Aviv 69512, Israel. erez@compugen.co.il

    A-to-I RNA editing by ADARs is a post-transcriptional mechanism for expanding the proteomic repertoire. Genetic recoding by editing was so far observed for only a few mammalian RNAs that are predominantly expressed in nervous tissues. However, as these editing targets fail to explain the broad and severe phenotypes of ADAR1 knockout mice, additional targets for editing by ADARs were always expected. Using comparative genomics and expressed sequence analysis, we identified and experimentally verified four additional candidate human substrates for ADAR-mediated editing: FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2 and IGFBP7. Additionally, editing of three of these substrates was verified in the mouse while two of them were validated in chicken. Interestingly, none of these substrates encodes a receptor protein but two of them are strongly expressed in the CNS and seem important for proper nervous system function. The editing pattern observed suggests that some of the affected proteins might have altered physiological properties leaving the possibility that they can be related to the phenotypes of ADAR1 knockout mice.

    Nucleic acids research 2005;33;4;1162-8

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • From ORFeome to biology: a functional genomics pipeline.

    Wiemann S, Arlt D, Huber W, Wellenreuther R, Schleeger S, Mehrle A, Bechtel S, Sauermann M, Korf U, Pepperkok R, Sültmann H and Poustka A

    Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. s.wiemann@dkfz.de

    As several model genomes have been sequenced, the elucidation of protein function is the next challenge toward the understanding of biological processes in health and disease. We have generated a human ORFeome resource and established a functional genomics and proteomics analysis pipeline to address the major topics in the post-genome-sequencing era: the identification of human genes and splice forms, and the determination of protein localization, activity, and interaction. Combined with the understanding of when and where gene products are expressed in normal and diseased conditions, we create information that is essential for understanding the interplay of genes and proteins in the complex biological network. We have implemented bioinformatics tools and databases that are suitable to store, analyze, and integrate the different types of data from high-throughput experiments and to include further annotation that is based on external information. All information is presented in a Web database (http://www.dkfz.de/LIFEdb). It is exploited for the identification of disease-relevant genes and proteins for diagnosis and therapy.

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2136-44

  • Interchangeable functions of Arabidopsis PIROGI and the human WAVE complex subunit SRA1 during leaf epidermal development.

    Basu D, El-Assal Sel-D, Le J, Mallery EL and Szymanski DB

    Agronomy Department, Purdue University, Lilly Hall, 915 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, USA.

    The WAVE complex is an essential regulator of actin-related protein (ARP) 2/3-dependent actin filament nucleation and cell shape change in migrating cells. Although the composition of the WAVE complex is well characterized, the cellular mechanisms that control its activity and localization are not well known. The 'distorted group' defines a set of Arabidopsis genes that are required to remodel the actin cytoskeleton and maintain the polarized elongation of branched, hair-like cells termed trichomes. Several loci within this group encode homologs of ARP2/3 subunits. In addition to trichome distortion, ARP2/3 subunit mutants have reduced shoot fresh weight and widespread defects in epidermal cell-cell adhesion. The precise cellular function of plant ARP2/3, and the means by which it is regulated, is not known. In this paper, we report that the 'distorted group' gene PIROGI encodes a homolog of the WAVE complex subunit SRA1. The similar cell shape and actin phenotypes of pir and ARP2/3 complex subunit mutants suggest that PIROGI positively regulates ARP2/3. PIROGI directly interacts with the small GTPase ATROP2 with isoform specificity and with selectivity for active forms of the protein. PIROGI shares only 30% amino acid identity with its human homolog. However, both WAVE subunit homologs are functionally interchangeable and display identical physical interactions with RHO family GTPases and the Arabidopsis homolog of the WAVE complex subunit NAP125. These results demonstrate the utility of the 'distorted group' mutants to study ARP2/3 complex functions from signaling input to cell shape output.

    Development (Cambridge, England) 2004;131;17;4345-55

  • Proteomic, functional, and domain-based analysis of in vivo 14-3-3 binding proteins involved in cytoskeletal regulation and cellular organization.

    Jin J, Smith FD, Stark C, Wells CD, Fawcett JP, Kulkarni S, Metalnikov P, O'Donnell P, Taylor P, Taylor L, Zougman A, Woodgett JR, Langeberg LK, Scott JD and Pawson T

    Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada.

    Background: 14-3-3 proteins are abundant and conserved polypeptides that mediate the cellular effects of basophilic protein kinases through their ability to bind specific peptide motifs phosphorylated on serine or threonine.

    Results: We have used mass spectrometry to analyze proteins that associate with 14-3-3 isoforms in HEK293 cells. This identified 170 unique 14-3-3-associated proteins, which show only modest overlap with previous 14-3-3 binding partners isolated by affinity chromatography. To explore this large set of proteins, we developed a domain-based hierarchical clustering technique that distinguishes structurally and functionally related subsets of 14-3-3 target proteins. This analysis revealed a large group of 14-3-3 binding partners that regulate cytoskeletal architecture. Inhibition of 14-3-3 phosphoprotein recognition in vivo indicates the general importance of such interactions in cellular morphology and membrane dynamics. Using tandem proteomic and biochemical approaches, we identify a phospho-dependent 14-3-3 binding site on the A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho GTPase. 14-3-3 binding to AKAP-Lbc, induced by PKA, suppresses Rho activation in vivo.

    Conclusion: 14-3-3 proteins can potentially engage around 0.6% of the human proteome. Domain-based clustering has identified specific subsets of 14-3-3 targets, including numerous proteins involved in the dynamic control of cell architecture. This notion has been validated by the broad inhibition of 14-3-3 phosphorylation-dependent binding in vivo and by the specific analysis of AKAP-Lbc, a RhoGEF that is controlled by its interaction with 14-3-3.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK44239

    Current biology : CB 2004;14;16;1436-50

  • Abi1 is essential for the formation and activation of a WAVE2 signalling complex.

    Innocenti M, Zucconi A, Disanza A, Frittoli E, Areces LB, Steffen A, Stradal TE, Di Fiore PP, Carlier MF and Scita G

    IFOM Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare Via Adamello 16, 20134, Milan, Italy.

    WAVE2 belongs to a family of proteins that mediates actin reorganization by relaying signals from Rac to the Arp2/3 complex, resulting in lamellipodia protrusion. WAVE2 displays Arp2/3-dependent actin nucleation activity in vitro, and does not bind directly to Rac. Instead, it forms macromolecular complexes that have been reported to exert both positive and negative modes of regulation. How these complexes are assembled, localized and activated in vivo remains to be established. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry to identify an Abi1-based complex containing WAVE2, Nap1 (Nck-associated protein) and PIR121. Abi1 interacts directly with the WHD domain of WAVE2, increases WAVE2 actin polymerization activity and mediates the assembly of a WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex. The WAVE2-Abi1-Nap1-PIR121 complex is as active as the WAVE2-Abi1 sub-complex in stimulating Arp2/3, and after Rac activation it is re-localized to the leading edge of ruffles in vivo. Consistently, inhibition of Abi1 by RNA interference (RNAi) abrogates Rac-dependent lamellipodia protrusion. Thus, Abi1 orchestrates the proper assembly of the WAVE2 complex and mediates its activation at the leading edge in vivo.

    Funded by: Telethon: D.090

    Nature cell biology 2004;6;4;319-27

  • CYFIP2 is highly abundant in CD4+ cells from multiple sclerosis patients and is involved in T cell adhesion.

    Mayne M, Moffatt T, Kong H, McLaren PJ, Fowke KR, Becker KG, Namaka M, Schenck A, Bardoni B, Bernstein CN and Melanson M

    Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of Manitoba, Division of Neuroscience, St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, Winnipeg, Canada. michael.mayne@nrc.gc.ca

    DNA microarray profiling of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells from non-treated relapsing and remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients determined that the cytoplasmic binding partner of fragile X protein (CYFIP2, also called PIR121) was increased significantly compared to healthy controls. Western analysis confirmed that CYFIP2 protein was increased approximately fourfold in CD4(+) cells from MS compared to inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD) patients or healthy controls. Because CYFIP2 acts as part of a tetrameric complex that regulates WAVE1 activation we hypothesized that high levels of CYFIP2 facilitate T cell adhesion, which is elevated in MS patients. Several findings indicated that increased levels of CYFIP2 facilitated adhesion. First, adenoviral-mediated overexpression of CYFIP2 in Jurkat cells increased fibronectin-mediated adhesion. Secondly, CYFIP2 knock-down experiments using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides reduced fibronectin-mediated binding in Jurkat and CD4(+) cells. Thirdly, inhibition of Rac-1, a physical partner with CYFIP2 and regulator of WAVE1 activity, reduced fibronectin-mediated adhesion in Jurkat and CD4(+) cells. Finally, inhibition of Rac-1 or reduction of CYFIP2 protein decreased fibronectin-mediated adhesion in CD4(+) cells from MS patients to levels similar to controls. These studies suggest that overabundance of CYFIP2 protein facilitates increased adhesion properties of T cells from MS patients.

    European journal of immunology 2004;34;4;1217-27

  • Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human Par protein complexes reveals an interconnected protein network.

    Brajenovic M, Joberty G, Küster B, Bouwmeester T and Drewes G

    Cellzome AG, Meyerhofstrasse 1, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.

    The polarization of eukaryotic cells is controlled by the concerted activities of asymmetrically localized proteins. The PAR proteins, first identified in Caenorhabditis elegans, are common regulators of cell polarity conserved from nematode and flies to man. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins and protein complexes establish cell polarity in mammals. We have mapped multiprotein complexes formed around the putative human Par orthologs MARK4 (microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4) (Par-1), Par-3, LKB1 (Par-4), 14-3-3zeta and eta (Par-5), Par-6a, -b, -c, and PKClambda (PKC3). We employed a proteomic approach comprising tandem affinity purification (TAP) of protein complexes from cultured cells and protein sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. From these data we constructed a highly interconnected protein network consisting of three core complex "modules" formed around MARK4 (Par-1), Par-3.Par-6, and LKB1 (Par-4). The network confirms most previously reported interactions. In addition we identified more than 50 novel interactors, some of which, like the 14-3-3 phospho-protein scaffolds, occur in more than one distinct complex. We demonstrate that the complex formation between LKB1.Par-4, PAPK, and Mo25 results in the translocation of LKB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and to tight junctions and show that the LKB1 complex may activate MARKs, which are known to introduce 14-3-3 binding sites into several substrates. Our findings suggest co-regulation and/or signaling events between the distinct Par complexes and provide a basis for further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that govern cell polarity.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2004;279;13;12804-11

  • Tuba, a novel protein containing bin/amphiphysin/Rvs and Dbl homology domains, links dynamin to regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Salazar MA, Kwiatkowski AV, Pellegrini L, Cestra G, Butler MH, Rossman KL, Serna DM, Sondek J, Gertler FB and De Camilli P

    Department of Cell Biology and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06519, USA.

    Tuba is a novel scaffold protein that functions to bring together dynamin with actin regulatory proteins. It is concentrated at synapses in brain and binds dynamin selectively through four N-terminal Src homology-3 (SH3) domains. Tuba binds a variety of actin regulatory proteins, including N-WASP, CR16, WAVE1, WIRE, PIR121, NAP1, and Ena/VASP proteins, via a C-terminal SH3 domain. Direct binding partners include N-WASP and Ena/VASP proteins. Forced targeting of the C-terminal SH3 domain to the mitochondrial surface can promote accumulation of F-actin around mitochondria. A Dbl homology domain present in the middle of Tuba upstream of a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain activates Cdc42, but not Rac and Rho, and may thus cooperate with the C terminus of the protein in regulating actin assembly. The BAR domain, a lipid-binding module, may functionally replace the pleckstrin homology domain that typically follows a Dbl homology domain. The properties of Tuba provide new evidence for a close functional link between dynamin, Rho GTPase signaling, and the actin cytoskeleton.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA46128; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM58801, GM62299; NINDS NIH HHS: NS36251

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;49;49031-43

  • 82-FIP, a novel FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein) interacting protein, shows a cell cycle-dependent intracellular localization.

    Bardoni B, Castets M, Huot ME, Schenck A, Adinolfi S, Corbin F, Pastore A, Khandjian EW and Mandel JL

    Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS/INSERM/ULP, BP 10142, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, France. bardoni@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr

    FMRP is an RNA binding protein whose absence produces pathological manifestations of the fragile-X syndrome. FMRP is a component of mRNP complexes found in association with actively translating polyribosomes, RNA complexes trafficking in neurites, RNA granules in cytoplasm and, in Drosophila, with the RNAi machinery. We report here the identification and characterization of a novel FMRP-interacting protein associated to polyribosomes as a component of mRNP complexes containing FMRP. We named this protein 82-FIP (82-kD FMRP Interacting Protein). FMRP interacts with 82-FIP through a novel interaction motif located in its N-terminal region. The distribution of 82-FIP in different areas of the brain is very similar to that of FMRP. However, unlike FMRP, 82-FIP is found in both nucleus and cytoplasm in some neurons, while it appears only cytoplasmic in others. Subcellular distribution of 82-FIP is cell cycle-dependent in cultured cells, suggesting that the composition of some FMRP-containing RNP complexes may be cell cycle-modulated.

    Human molecular genetics 2003;12;14;1689-98

  • Mechanism of regulation of WAVE1-induced actin nucleation by Rac1 and Nck.

    Eden S, Rohatgi R, Podtelejnikov AV, Mann M and Kirschner MW

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    Rac signalling to actin -- a pathway that is thought to be mediated by the protein Scar/WAVE (WASP (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein)-family verprolin homologous protein -- has a principal role in cell motility. In an analogous pathway, direct interaction of Cdc42 with the related protein N-WASP stimulates actin polymerization. For the Rac-WAVE pathway, no such direct interaction has been identified. Here we report a mechanism by which Rac and the adapter protein Nck activate actin nucleation through WAVE1. WAVE1 exists in a heterotetrameric complex that includes orthologues of human PIR121 (p53-inducible messenger RNA with a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 140,000), Nap125 (NCK-associated protein with an M(r) of 125,000) and HSPC300. Whereas recombinant WAVE1 is constitutively active, the WAVE1 complex is inactive. We therefore propose that Rac1 and Nck cause dissociation of the WAVE1 complex, which releases active WAVE1-HSPC300 and leads to actin nucleation.

    Nature 2002;418;6899;790-3

  • A highly conserved protein family interacting with the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and displaying selective interactions with FMRP-related proteins FXR1P and FXR2P.

    Schenck A, Bardoni B, Moro A, Bagni C and Mandel JL

    Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale/Université Louis Pasteur, B.P. 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, Strasbourg, France.

    The absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), encoded by the FMR1 gene, is responsible for pathologic manifestations in the Fragile X Syndrome, the most frequent cause of inherited mental retardation. FMRP is an RNA-binding protein associated with polysomes as part of a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. Although its function is poorly understood, various observations suggest a role in local protein translation at neuronal dendrites and in dendritic spine maturation. We present here the identification of CYFIP1/2 (Cytoplasmic FMRP Interacting Proteins) as FMRP interactors. CYFIP1/2 share 88% amino acid sequence identity and represent the two members in humans of a highly conserved protein family. Remarkably, whereas CYFIP2 also interacts with the FMRP-related proteins FXR1P/2P, CYFIP1 interacts exclusively with FMRP. FMRP--CYFIP interaction involves the domain of FMRP also mediating homo- and heteromerization, thus suggesting a competition between interaction among the FXR proteins and interaction with CYFIP. CYFIP1/2 are proteins of unknown function, but CYFIP1 has recently been shown to interact with the small GTPase Rac1, which is implicated in development and maintenance of neuronal structures. Consistent with FMRP and Rac1 localization in dendritic fine structures, CYFIP1/2 are present in synaptosomal extracts.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2001;98;15;8844-9

  • Toward a catalog of human genes and proteins: sequencing and analysis of 500 novel complete protein coding human cDNAs.

    Wiemann S, Weil B, Wellenreuther R, Gassenhuber J, Glassl S, Ansorge W, Böcher M, Blöcker H, Bauersachs S, Blum H, Lauber J, Düsterhöft A, Beyer A, Köhrer K, Strack N, Mewes HW, Ottenwälder B, Obermaier B, Tampe J, Heubner D, Wambutt R, Korn B, Klein M and Poustka A

    Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. s.wiemann@dkfz.de

    With the complete human genomic sequence being unraveled, the focus will shift to gene identification and to the functional analysis of gene products. The generation of a set of cDNAs, both sequences and physical clones, which contains the complete and noninterrupted protein coding regions of all human genes will provide the indispensable tools for the systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein function to eventually understand the molecular basis of man. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of 500 novel human cDNAs containing the complete protein coding frame. Assignment to functional categories was possible for 52% (259) of the encoded proteins, the remaining fraction having no similarities with known proteins. By aligning the cDNA sequences with the sequences of the finished chromosomes 21 and 22 we identified a number of genes that either had been completely missed in the analysis of the genomic sequences or had been wrongly predicted. Three of these genes appear to be present in several copies. We conclude that full-length cDNA sequencing continues to be crucial also for the accurate identification of genes. The set of 500 novel cDNAs, and another 1000 full-coding cDNAs of known transcripts we have identified, adds up to cDNA representations covering 2%--5 % of all human genes. We thus substantially contribute to the generation of a gene catalog, consisting of both full-coding cDNA sequences and clones, which should be made freely available and will become an invaluable tool for detailed functional studies.

    Genome research 2001;11;3;422-35

  • DNA cloning using in vitro site-specific recombination.

    Hartley JL, Temple GF and Brasch MA

    Life Technologies, Inc., Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA. jhartley@lifetech.com

    As a result of numerous genome sequencing projects, large numbers of candidate open reading frames are being identified, many of which have no known function. Analysis of these genes typically involves the transfer of DNA segments into a variety of vector backgrounds for protein expression and functional analysis. We describe a method called recombinational cloning that uses in vitro site-specific recombination to accomplish the directional cloning of PCR products and the subsequent automatic subcloning of the DNA segment into new vector backbones at high efficiency. Numerous DNA segments can be transferred in parallel into many different vector backgrounds, providing an approach to high-throughput, in-depth functional analysis of genes and rapid optimization of protein expression. The resulting subclones maintain orientation and reading frame register, allowing amino- and carboxy-terminal translation fusions to be generated. In this paper, we outline the concepts of this approach and provide several examples that highlight some of its potential.

    Genome research 2000;10;11;1788-95

  • Characterization of cDNA clones selected by the GeneMark analysis from size-fractionated cDNA libraries from human brain.

    Hirosawa M, Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Kikuno R, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    We have conducted a sequencing project of human cDNAs which encode large proteins in brain. For selection of cDNA clones to be sequenced in this project, cDNA clones have been experimentally examined by in vitro transcription/translation prior to sequencing. In this study, we tested an alternative approach for picking up cDNA clones having a high probability of carrying protein coding region. This approach exploited 5'-end single-pass sequence data and the GeneMark program for assessing protein-coding potential, and allowed us to select 74 clones out of 14,804 redundant cDNA clones. The complete sequence data of these 74 clones revealed that 45% of them encoded proteins consisting of more than 500 amino acid residues while all the clones thus selected carried possible protein coding sequences as expected. The results indicated that the GeneMark analysis of 5'-end sequences of cDNAs offered us a simple and effective means to select cDNA clones with protein-coding potential although the sizes of the encoded proteins could not be predicted.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;5;329-36

  • Increased apoptosis induction by 121F mutant p53.

    Saller E, Tom E, Brunori M, Otter M, Estreicher A, Mack DH and Iggo R

    Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), CH-1066 Epalinges, Switzerland.

    p53 mutants in tumours have a reduced affinity for DNA and a reduced ability to induce apoptosis. We describe a mutant with the opposite phenotype, an increased affinity for some p53-binding sites and an increased ability to induce apoptosis. The apoptotic function requires transcription activation by p53. The mutant has an altered sequence specificity and selectively fails to activate MDM2 transcription. Loss of MDM2 feedback results in overexpression of the mutant, but the mutant kills better than wild-type p53 even in MDM2-null cells. Thus the apoptotic phenotype is due to a combination of decreased MDM2 feedback control and increased or unbalanced expression of other apoptosis-inducing p53 target genes. To identify these genes, DNA chips were screened using RNA from cells expressing the apoptosis-inducing mutant, 121F, and a sequence-specificity mutant with the reciprocal phenotype, 277R. Two potential new mediators of p53-dependent apoptosis were identified, Rad and PIR121, which are induced better by 121F than wild-type p53 and not induced by 277R. The 121F mutant kills untransformed MDM2-null but not wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and kills tumour cells irrespective of p53 status. It may thus expand the range of tumours which can be treated by p53 gene therapy.

    The EMBO journal 1999;18;16;4424-37

  • In mouse brain profilin I and profilin II associate with regulators of the endocytic pathway and actin assembly.

    Witke W, Podtelejnikov AV, Di Nardo A, Sutherland JD, Gurniak CB, Dotti C and Mann M

    Mouse Biology Programme, EMBL, Monterotondo/Rome, Italy. witke@embl-heidelberg.de

    Profilins are thought to be essential for regulation of actin assembly. However, the functions of profilins in mammalian tissues are not well understood. In mice profilin I is expressed ubiquitously while profilin II is expressed at high levels only in brain. In extracts from mouse brain, profilin I and profilin II can form complexes with regulators of endocytosis, synaptic vesicle recycling and actin assembly. Using mass spectrometry and database searching we characterized a number of ligands for profilin I and profilin II from mouse brain extracts including dynamin I, clathrin, synapsin, Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase, the Rac-associated protein NAP1 and a member of the NSF/sec18 family. In vivo, profilins co-localize with dynamin I and synapsin in axonal and dendritic processes. Our findings strongly suggest that in brain profilin I and profilin II complexes link the actin cytoskeleton and endocytic membrane flow, directing actin and clathrin assembly to distinct membrane domains.

    The EMBO journal 1998;17;4;967-76

  • Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library.

    Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K, Suyama A and Sugano S

    International and Interdisciplinary Studies, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

    Using 'oligo-capped' mRNA [Maruyama, K., Sugano, S., 1994. Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides. Gene 138, 171-174], whose cap structure was replaced by a synthetic oligonucleotide, we constructed two types of cDNA library. One is a 'full length-enriched cDNA library' which has a high content of full-length cDNA clones and the other is a '5'-end-enriched cDNA library', which has a high content of cDNA clones with their mRNA start sites. The 5'-end-enriched library was constructed especially for isolating the mRNA start sites of long mRNAs. In order to characterize these libraries, we performed one-pass sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones from both libraries (84 clones for the full length-enriched cDNA library and 159 clones for the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library). The cDNA clones of the polypeptide chain elongation factor 1 alpha were most frequently (nine clones) isolated, and more than 80% of them (eight clones) contained the mRNA start site of the gene. Furthermore, about 80% of the cDNA clones of both libraries whose sequence matched with known genes had the known 5' ends or sequences upstream of the known 5' ends (28 out of 35 for the full length-enriched library and 51 out of 62 for the 5'-end-enriched library). The longest full-length clone of the full length-enriched cDNA library was about 3300 bp (among 28 clones). In contrast, seven clones (out of the 51 clones with the mRNA start sites) from the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library came from mRNAs whose length is more than 3500 bp. These cDNA libraries may be useful for generating 5' ESTs with the information of the mRNA start sites that are now scarce in the EST database.

    Gene 1997;200;1-2;149-56

  • Molecular cloning of p125Nap1, a protein that associates with an SH3 domain of Nck.

    Kitamura T, Kitamura Y, Yonezawa K, Totty NF, Gout I, Hara K, Waterfield MD, Sakaue M, Ogawa W and Kasuga M

    Second Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Japan.

    Binding proteins to the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of Nck were screened by the use of glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Two proteins of 140 and 125 kDa were detected, both of which associated preferentially with the first SH3 domain of Nck. The 125-kDa protein, designated as Nap1 for Nck-associated protein 1, was purified and the corresponding rat cDNA was isolated. The predicted amino acid sequence revealed that p125Nap1 does not contain any known functional motif but shows sequence homology to Hem family gene. Using specific antibodies, p125Nap1 was shown to associate with Nck both in vitro and in intact cells. Further characterization of p125Nap1 may clarify the protein-protein interaction in the downstream signaling of Nck.

    Biochemical and biophysical research communications 1996;219;2;509-14

  • Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides.

    Maruyama K and Sugano S

    Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan.

    We have devised a method to replace the cap structure of a mRNA with an oligoribonucleotide (r-oligo) to label the 5' end of eukaryotic mRNAs. The method consists of removing the cap with tobacco acid pyrophosphatase (TAP) and ligating r-oligos to decapped mRNAs with T4 RNA ligase. This reaction was made cap-specific by removing 5'-phosphates of non-capped RNAs with alkaline phosphatase prior to TAP treatment. Unlike the conventional methods that label the 5' end of cDNAs, this method specifically labels the capped end of the mRNAs with a synthetic r-oligo prior to first-strand cDNA synthesis. The 5' end of the mRNA was identified quite simply by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    Gene 1994;138;1-2;171-4

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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