G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001583
Gene symbol
GPRIN1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1
Orthologue
G00000334 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000169258 (Ensembl human gene)
114787 (Entrez Gene)
674 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
GPRIN1 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:24835 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q7Z2K8 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • GRIN1
  • KIAA1893

Literature (6)

Pubmed - other

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.

    Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, Elias JE, Villén J, Li J, Cohn MA, Cantley LC and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Determining the site of a regulatory phosphorylation event is often essential for elucidating specific kinase-substrate relationships, providing a handle for understanding essential signaling pathways and ultimately allowing insights into numerous disease pathologies. Despite intense research efforts to elucidate mechanisms of protein phosphorylation regulation, efficient, large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites remains an unsolved problem. In this report we describe an application of existing technology for the isolation and identification of phosphorylation sites. By using a strategy based on strong cation exchange chromatography, phosphopeptides were enriched from the nuclear fraction of HeLa cell lysate. From 967 proteins, 2,002 phosphorylation sites were determined by tandem MS. This unprecedented large collection of sites permitted a detailed accounting of known and unknown kinase motifs and substrates.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041, K22 HG000041, T32 HG000041; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945, GMS6203, R01 GM056203, R01 GM067945

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;33;12130-5

  • Identification and biochemical analysis of GRIN1 and GRIN2.

    Iida N and Kozasa T

    Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois, Chicago, USA.

    We have identified the novel Galphaz-binding protein, which is referred to as the G-protein-regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth (GRIN1) using the far-western method. GRIN1 is expressed specifically in brain and binds preferentially to the activated form of alpha subunits of Gz, Gi, and Go. Coexpression of GRIN1 and the activated form of Galphao induce neurite outgrowth in Neuro2a cells. We have further identified two human GRIN1 homologs, GRIN2 and GRIN3, in the database. This article shows that GRIN2 can also bind to the GTP-bound form of Galphao. These findings suggest that the GRIN1 family may function as a downstream effector for Galphao to regulate neurite growth.

    Methods in enzymology 2004;390;475-83

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XXI. The complete sequences of 60 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins.

    Nagase T, Kikuno R and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan. nagase@kazusa.or.jp

    As an extension of a sequencing project of human cDNA clones which encode large proteins of unidentified genes, we herein present the entire sequences of 60 cDNA clones for the genes named KIAA1879-KIAA1938. The cDNA clones were isolated from size-fractionated cDNA libraries derived from human fetal brain, adult whole brain and amygdala, and their protein-coding sequences were predicted. Thirty-seven cDNA clones entirely sequenced in this study were selected as cDNAs which have coding potentiality by in vitro transcription/translation experiments, and the remaining 23 cDNA clones were chosen by computer-assisted analysis of terminal sequences of cDNAs. The average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames of cDNA clones analyzed here were 4.5 kb and 2.2 kb (733 amino acid residues), respectively. Sequence analyses against the public databases enabled us to annotate the functions of the predicted products of the 25 genes; 84% of these predicted gene products (21 gene products) were classified into proteins related to cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, and cell structure/motility. In addition to the sequence information about these 60 genes, their expression profiles were also studied in some human tissues including brain regions by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 2001;8;4;179-87

  • A candidate target for G protein action in brain.

    Chen LT, Gilman AG and Kozasa T

    Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235-9041, USA.

    An effector candidate for G protein action, GRIN1, was identified by screening a cDNA expression library with phosphorylated GTPgammaS-G(z)alpha as a probe. GRIN1 is a novel protein without substantial homology to known protein domains. It is expressed largely in brain and binds specifically to activated G(z)alpha, G(o)alpha, and G(i)alpha through its carboxyl-terminal region. The protein KIAA0514 (GRIN2) is homologous to GRIN1 at its carboxyl terminus and also binds to activated G(o)alpha. Both GRIN1 and G(o)alpha are membrane-bound proteins that are enriched in the growth cones of neurites. Coexpression of GRIN1 or GRIN2 with activated G(o)alpha causes formation of a network of fine processes in Neuro2a cells, suggesting that these pathways may function downstream of G(o)alpha to control growth of neurites.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM34497

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1999;274;38;26931-8

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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