G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001566
Gene symbol
PSMD14 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
proteasome (prosome, macropain) 26S subunit, non-ATPase, 14
Orthologue
G00000317 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000115233 (Ensembl human gene)
10213 (Entrez Gene)
653 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
PSMD14 (GeneCards)
Literature
607173 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:16889 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O00487 (UniProt)

Synonyms (3)

  • POH1
  • Rpn11
  • pad1

Literature (20)

Pubmed - other

  • Knockdown of human deubiquitinase PSMD14 induces cell cycle arrest and senescence.

    Byrne A, McLaren RP, Mason P, Chai L, Dufault MR, Huang Y, Liang B, Gans JD, Zhang M, Carter K, Gladysheva TB, Teicher BA, Biemann HP, Booker M, Goldberg MA, Klinger KW, Lillie J, Madden SL and Jiang Y

    Genzyme Corporation, 49 New York Avenue, Framingham, MA 01701, USA.

    The PSMD14 (POH1, also known as Rpn11/MPR1/S13/CepP1) protein within the 19S complex (19S cap; PA700) is responsible for substrate deubiquitination during proteasomal degradation. The role of PSMD14 in cell proliferation and senescence was explored using siRNA knockdown in carcinoma cell lines. Our results reveal that down-regulation of PSMD14 by siRNA transfection had a considerable impact on cell viability causing cell arrest in the G0-G1 phase, ultimately leading to senescence. The molecular events associated with decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and senescence include down-regulation of cyclin B1-CDK1-CDC25C, down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21(/Cip) and p27(/Kip1). Most notably, phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein was markedly reduced in PSMD14 knockdown cells. A comparative study with PSMB5, a subunit of the 20S proteasome, revealed that PSMB5 and PSMD14 have different effects on cell cycle, senescence and associated molecular events. These data support the view that the 19S and 20S subunits of the proteasome have distinct biological functions and imply that targeting 19S and 20S would have distinct molecular consequences on tumor cells.

    Experimental cell research 2010;316;2;258-71

  • Relationship between expression of Pad1 homologue and multidrug resistance of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    Ma Z, Gao X, Zhao W, Li Y, Li C and Li C

    Divisions of Pediatric Nephrology, Shenzhen Children's Hospital, Guangdong, China. mzx7321@sina.com

    Background: Multidrug resistance is an occasionally seen phenomenon in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS), but the mechanism of multidrug resistance is not clear as yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigated whether expression of Pad1 homologue (POH1) plays a role in the onset of multidrug resistance of INS.

    Methods: Comparison was done of the mRNA level of POH1 on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells among children with multidrug-resistant INS, children with steroid-sensitive INS and healthy controls.

    Results: The POH1 mRNA level of the onset INS group (5852.3 +/- 2676.4 copies/microg) was significantly lower than that of the control group (10 877.1 +/- 2386.6 copies/microg; P < 0.05). The POH1 mRNA level of the onset INS group with multidrug resistance was not significantly higher than that of the onset INS group without multidrug-resistance before treatment (6977.1 +/- 6312.3 copies/microg vs 5281.3 +/- 1926.7 copies/microg; P > 0.05), but significantly higher than that of the onset INS group without multidrug resistance after treatment (436 579.6 +/- 99 727.4 copies/microg vs 38 438.2 +/- 16 772.5 copies/microg; P < 0.001). The POH1 mRNA level of non-onset multidrug-resistant INS group (337 446.4 +/- 107 423.5 copies/microg) after treatment was not significantly higher than that of the onset INS group with multidrug resistance after treatment (436 579.6 +/- 99 727.4 copies/microg; P > 0.05), but was significantly higher than that of the onset INS group without multidrug resistance after treatment (38 438.2 +/- 16 772.5 copies/microg; P < 0.001).

    Conclusions: Disorder of POH1 expression is involved in the onset of INS, and confers multidrug resistance in children with INS.

    Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society 2009;51;5;732-5

  • Defining the human deubiquitinating enzyme interaction landscape.

    Sowa ME, Bennett EJ, Gygi SP and Harper JW

    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (Dubs) function to remove covalently attached ubiquitin from proteins, thereby controlling substrate activity and/or abundance. For most Dubs, their functions, targets, and regulation are poorly understood. To systematically investigate Dub function, we initiated a global proteomic analysis of Dubs and their associated protein complexes. This was accomplished through the development of a software platform called CompPASS, which uses unbiased metrics to assign confidence measurements to interactions from parallel nonreciprocal proteomic data sets. We identified 774 candidate interacting proteins associated with 75 Dubs. Using Gene Ontology, interactome topology classification, subcellular localization, and functional studies, we link Dubs to diverse processes, including protein turnover, transcription, RNA processing, DNA damage, and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. This work provides the first glimpse into the Dub interaction landscape, places previously unstudied Dubs within putative biological pathways, and identifies previously unknown interactions and protein complexes involved in this increasingly important arm of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Funded by: NIA NIH HHS: AG085011, R01 AG011085, R01 AG011085-16; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM054137, GM67945, R01 GM054137, R01 GM054137-14, R01 GM067945

    Cell 2009;138;2;389-403

  • Chaperone-mediated pathway of proteasome regulatory particle assembly.

    Roelofs J, Park S, Haas W, Tian G, McAllister FE, Huo Y, Lee BH, Zhang F, Shi Y, Gygi SP and Finley D

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    The proteasome is a protease that controls diverse processes in eukaryotic cells. Its regulatory particle (RP) initiates the degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by unfolding the substrate and translocating it into the proteasome core particle (CP) to be degraded. The RP has 19 subunits, and their pathway of assembly is not understood. Here we show that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae three proteins are found associated with RP but not with the RP-CP holoenzyme: Nas6, Rpn14 and Hsm3. Mutations in the corresponding genes confer proteasome loss-of-function phenotypes, despite their virtual absence from the holoenzyme. These effects result from deficient RP assembly. Thus, Nas6, Rpn14 and Hsm3 are RP chaperones. The RP contains six ATPases-the Rpt proteins-and each RP chaperone binds to the carboxy-terminal domain of a specific Rpt. We show in an accompanying study that RP assembly is templated through the Rpt C termini, apparently by their insertion into binding pockets in the CP. Thus, RP chaperones may regulate proteasome assembly by directly restricting the accessibility of Rpt C termini to the CP. In addition, competition between the RP chaperones and the CP for Rpt engagement may explain the release of RP chaperones as proteasomes mature.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: 5F32GM75737-2, F32 GM075737, GM043601, GM67945, R01 GM043601, R37 GM043601, R37 GM043601-19

    Nature 2009;459;7248;861-5

  • K63-specific deubiquitination by two JAMM/MPN+ complexes: BRISC-associated Brcc36 and proteasomal Poh1.

    Cooper EM, Cutcliffe C, Kristiansen TZ, Pandey A, Pickart CM and Cohen RE

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. emcooper@jhsph.edu

    An unusual deubiquitinating (DUB) activity exists in HeLa cell extracts that is highly specific for cleaving K63-linked but not K48-linked polyubiquitin chains. The activity is insensitive to both N-ethyl-maleimide and ubiquitin aldehyde, indicating that it lacks an active site cysteine residue, and gel filtration experiments show that it resides in a high molecular weight (approximately 600 kDa) complex. Using a biochemical approach, we found that the K63-specific DUB activity co-fractionated through seven chromatographic steps with three multisubunit complexes: the 19S (PA700) portion of the 26S proteasome, the COP9 signalosome (CSN) and a novel complex that includes the JAMM/MPN+ domain-containing protein Brcc36. When we analysed the individual complexes, we found that the activity was intrinsic to PA700 and the Brcc36 isopeptidase complex (BRISC), but that the CSN-associated activity was due entirely to an interaction with Brcc36. None of the complexes cleave K6, K11, K29, K48 or alpha-linked polyubiquitin, but they do cleave K63 linkages within mixed-linkage chains. Our results suggest that specificity for K63-linked polyubiquitin is a common property of the JAMM/MPN+ family of DUBs.

    Funded by: NCRR NIH HHS: RR020839, U54 RR020839; NIGMS NIH HHS: 5F32GM075712, F32 GM075712

    The EMBO journal 2009;28;6;621-31

  • Relative structural and functional roles of multiple deubiquitylating proteins associated with mammalian 26S proteasome.

    Koulich E, Li X and DeMartino GN

    Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9040, USA.

    We determined composition and relative roles of deubiquitylating proteins associated with the 26S proteasome in mammalian cells. Three deubiquitylating activities were associated with the 26S proteasome: two from constituent subunits, Rpn11/S13 and Uch37, and one from a reversibly associated protein, Usp14. RNA interference (RNAi) of Rpn11/S13 inhibited cell growth, decreased cellular proteasome activity via disrupted 26S proteasome assembly, and inhibited cellular protein degradation. In contrast, RNAi of Uch37 or Usp14 had no detectable effect on cell growth, proteasome structure or proteolytic capacity, but accelerated cellular protein degradation. RNAi of both Uch37 and Usp14 also had no effect on proteasome structure or proteolytic capacity, but inhibited cellular protein degradation. Thus, proper proteasomal processing of ubiquitylated substrates requires Rpn11 plus either Uch37 or Usp14. Although the latter proteins feature redundant deubiquitylation functions, they also appear to exert noncatalyic effects on proteasome activity that are similar to but independent of one another. These results reveal unexpected functional relationships among multiple deubiquitylating proteins and suggest a model for mammalian 26S proteasome function whereby their concerted action governs proteasome function by linking deubiquitylation to substrate hydrolysis.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK 46181, R01 DK046181, R56 DK046181

    Molecular biology of the cell 2008;19;3;1072-82

  • Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome.

    Barbe L, Lundberg E, Oksvold P, Stenius A, Lewin E, Björling E, Asplund A, Pontén F, Brismar H, Uhlén M and Andersson-Svahn H

    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2008;7;3;499-508

  • The JAMM motif of human deubiquitinase Poh1 is essential for cell viability.

    Gallery M, Blank JL, Lin Y, Gutierrez JA, Pulido JC, Rappoli D, Badola S, Rolfe M and Macbeth KJ

    Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 40 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. kyle.macbeth@mpi.com

    Poh1 deubiquitinase activity is required for proteolytic processing of polyubiquitinated substrates by the 26S proteasome, linking deubiquitination to complete substrate degradation. Poh1 RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells resulted in a reduction in cell viability and an increase in polyubiquitinated protein levels, supporting the link between Poh1 and the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. To more specifically test for any requirement of the zinc metalloproteinase motif of Poh1 to support cell viability and proteasome function, we developed a RNAi complementation strategy. Effects on cell viability and proteasome activity were assessed in cells with RNAi of endogenous Poh1 and induced expression of wild-type Poh1 or a mutant form of Poh1, in which two conserved histidines of the proposed catalytic site were replaced with alanines. We show that an intact zinc metalloproteinase motif is essential for cell viability and 26S proteasome function. As a required enzymatic component of the proteasome, Poh1 is an intriguing therapeutic drug target for cancer.

    Molecular cancer therapeutics 2007;6;1;262-8

  • Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom-Cerajewski L, Robinson MD, O'Connor L, Li M, Taylor R, Dharsee M, Ho Y, Heilbut A, Moore L, Zhang S, Ornatsky O, Bukhman YV, Ethier M, Sheng Y, Vasilescu J, Abu-Farha M, Lambert JP, Duewel HS, Stewart II, Kuehl B, Hogue K, Colwill K, Gladwish K, Muskat B, Kinach R, Adams SL, Moran MF, Morin GB, Topaloglou T and Figeys D

    Protana, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

    Molecular systems biology 2007;3;89

  • The 19 S proteasomal subunit POH1 contributes to the regulation of c-Jun ubiquitination, stability, and subcellular localization.

    Nabhan JF and Ribeiro P

    Institute of Parasitology, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec H9X 3V9, Canada.

    The AP1 (activator protein 1) transcription factor, c-Jun, is an important regulator of cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and death. Its activity is regulated both at the level of transcription and post-translationally through phosphorylation, sumoylation, and targeted degradation. The degradation of c-Jun by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway has been well established. Here, we report that POH1, a subunit of the 19 S proteasome lid with a recently described deubiquitinase activity, is a regulator of c-Jun. Ectopic expression of POH1 in HEK293 cells decreased the level of c-Jun ubiquitination, leading to significant accumulation of the protein and a corresponding increase in AP1-mediated gene expression. The stabilization also correlated with a redistribution of c-Jun in the nucleus. These effects were reduced by mutation of a cysteine residue in the Mpr1 pad1 N-terminal plus motif of POH1 (Cys-120) and appeared to be selective for c-Jun, because POH1 had no effect on other proteasomal substrates. Our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Jun regulation in mammalian cells.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2006;281;23;16099-107

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T, Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • Immunoaffinity profiling of tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Rush J, Moritz A, Lee KA, Guo A, Goss VL, Spek EJ, Zhang H, Zha XM, Polakiewicz RD and Comb MJ

    Cell Signaling Technology Inc., 166B Cummings Center, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915, USA.

    Tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in human cancer, yet the oncogenic signaling pathways driving cell proliferation and survival have been difficult to identify, in part because of the complexity of the pathways and in part because of low cellular levels of tyrosine phosphorylation. In general, global phosphoproteomic approaches reveal small numbers of peptides containing phosphotyrosine. We have developed a strategy that emphasizes the phosphotyrosine component of the phosphoproteome and identifies large numbers of tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Peptides containing phosphotyrosine are isolated directly from protease-digested cellular protein extracts with a phosphotyrosine-specific antibody and are identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to several cell systems, including cancer cell lines, shows it can be used to identify activated protein kinases and their phosphorylated substrates without prior knowledge of the signaling networks that are activated, a first step in profiling normal and oncogenic signaling networks.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 1R43CA101106

    Nature biotechnology 2005;23;1;94-101

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Mammalian Cdh1/Fzr mediates its own degradation.

    Listovsky T, Oren YS, Yudkovsky Y, Mahbubani HM, Weiss AM, Lebendiker M and Brandeis M

    Department of Genetics, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.

    The Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase mediates degradation of cell cycle proteins during mitosis and G1. Cdc20/Fzy and Cdh1/Fzr are substrate-specific APC/C activators. The level of mammalian Cdh1 is high in mitosis, but it is inactive and does not bind the APC/C. We show that when Cdh1 is active in G1 and G0, its levels are considerably lower and almost all of it is APC/C associated. We demonstrate that Cdh1 is subject to APC/C-specific degradation in G1 and G0, and that this degradation depends upon two RXXL-type destruction boxes. We further demonstrate that addition of Cdh1 to Xenopus interphase extracts, which have an inactive APC/C, activates it to degrade Cdh1. These observations indicate that Cdh1 mediates its own degradation by activating the APC/C to degrade itself. Elevated levels of Cdh1 are deleterious for cell cycle progression in various organisms. This auto-regulation of Cdh1 could thus play a role in ensuring that the level of Cdh1 is reduced during G1 and G0, allowing it to be switched off at the correct time.

    The EMBO journal 2004;23;7;1619-26

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • JAMM: a metalloprotease-like zinc site in the proteasome and signalosome.

    Ambroggio XI, Rees DC and Deshaies RJ

    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA.

    The JAMM (JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme) motif in Rpn11 and Csn5 underlies isopeptidase activities intrinsic to the proteasome and signalosome, respectively. We show here that the archaebacterial protein AfJAMM possesses the key features of a zinc metalloprotease, yet with a distinct fold. The histidine and aspartic acid of the conserved EX(n)HS/THX(7)SXXD motif coordinate a zinc, whereas the glutamic acid hydrogen-bonds an aqua ligand. By analogy to the active site of thermolysin, we predict that the glutamic acid serves as an acid-base catalyst and the second serine stabilizes a tetrahedral intermediate. Mutagenesis of Csn5 confirms these residues are required for Nedd8 isopeptidase activity. The active site-like architecture specified by the JAMM motif motivates structure-based approaches to the study of JAMM domain proteins and the development of therapeutic proteasome and signalosome inhibitors.

    PLoS biology 2004;2;1;E2

  • Prophase destruction of Emi1 by the SCF(betaTrCP/Slimb) ubiquitin ligase activates the anaphase promoting complex to allow progression beyond prometaphase.

    Margottin-Goguet F, Hsu JY, Loktev A, Hsieh HM, Reimann JD and Jackson PK

    Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

    Progression through mitosis occurs because cyclin B/Cdc2 activation induces the anaphase promoting complex (APC) to cause cyclin B destruction and mitotic exit. To ensure that cyclin B/Cdc2 does not prematurely activate the APC in early mitosis, there must be a mechanism delaying APC activation. Emi1 is a protein capable of inhibiting the APC in S and G2. We show here that Emi1 is phosphorylated by Cdc2, and on a DSGxxS consensus site, is subsequently recognized by the SCF(betaTrCP/Slimb) ubiquitin ligase and destroyed, thus providing a delay for APC activation. Failure of betaTrCP-dependent Emi1 destruction stabilizes APC substrates and results in mitotic catastrophe including centrosome overduplication, potentially explaining mitotic deficiencies in Drosophila Slimb/betaTrCP mutants. We hypothesize that Emi1 destruction relieves a late prophase checkpoint for APC activation.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA09302; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM07365, GM54811, GM60439

    Developmental cell 2003;4;6;813-26

  • Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-dependent proteolysis of human cyclin A starts at the beginning of mitosis and is not subject to the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Geley S, Kramer E, Gieffers C, Gannon J, Peters JM and Hunt T

    Imperial Cancer Research Fund Clare Hall Laboratories, South Mimms, Herts EN6 3LD, United Kingdom.

    Cyclin A is a stable protein in S and G2 phases, but is destabilized when cells enter mitosis and is almost completely degraded before the metaphase to anaphase transition. Microinjection of antibodies against subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) or against human Cdc20 (fizzy) arrested cells at metaphase and stabilized both cyclins A and B1. Cyclin A was efficiently polyubiquitylated by Cdc20 or Cdh1-activated APC/C in vitro, but in contrast to cyclin B1, the proteolysis of cyclin A was not delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. The degradation of cyclin B1 was accelerated by inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint. These data suggest that the APC/C is activated as cells enter mitosis and immediately targets cyclin A for degradation, whereas the spindle assembly checkpoint delays the degradation of cyclin B1 until the metaphase to anaphase transition. The "destruction box" (D-box) of cyclin A is 10-20 residues longer than that of cyclin B. Overexpression of wild-type cyclin A delayed the metaphase to anaphase transition, whereas expression of cyclin A mutants lacking a D-box arrested cells in anaphase.

    The Journal of cell biology 2001;153;1;137-48

  • Resistance to diverse drugs and ultraviolet light conferred by overexpression of a novel human 26 S proteasome subunit.

    Spataro V, Toda T, Craig R, Seeger M, Dubiel W, Harris AL and Norbury C

    Imperial Cancer Research Fund Molecular Oncology Laboratory, University of Oxford Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DS, United Kingdom.

    We have investigated the usefulness of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model organism for the discovery of novel modes of drug resistance in human cells. In fission yeast, overexpression of the essential pad1(+) gene confers pleiotropic drug resistance through a pathway involving an AP-1 transcription factor encoded by pap1(+). We have identified POH1, a human pad1 homologue that can substitute fully for pad1(+) and induce AP-1-dependent drug resistance in fission yeast. POH1 also confers P-glycoprotein-independent resistance to taxol (paclitaxel), doxorubicin, 7-hydroxystaurosporine, and ultraviolet light when transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. Poh1 is a previously unidentified component of the human 26 S proteasome, a multiprotein complex that degrades proteins targeted for destruction by the ubiquitin pathway. Hence, Poh1 is part of a conserved mechanism that determines cellular susceptibility to cytotoxic agents, perhaps by influencing the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of transcription factors.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1997;272;48;30470-5

Gene lists (4)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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