G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001547
Gene symbol
ATP6V1B2 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ATPase, H+ transporting, lysosomal 56/58kDa, V1 subunit B2
Orthologue
G00000298 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000147416 (Ensembl human gene)
526 (Entrez Gene)
634 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
ATP6V1B2 (GeneCards)
Literature
606939 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:854 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P21281 (UniProt)

Synonyms (3)

  • HO57
  • VATB
  • Vma2

Literature (22)

Pubmed - other

  • Novel loci for major depression identified by genome-wide association study of Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression and meta-analysis of three studies.

    Shyn SI, Shi J, Kraft JB, Potash JB, Knowles JA, Weissman MM, Garriock HA, Yokoyama JS, McGrath PJ, Peters EJ, Scheftner WA, Coryell W, Lawson WB, Jancic D, Gejman PV, Sanders AR, Holmans P, Slager SL, Levinson DF and Hamilton SP

    Department of Psychiatry and Institute for Human Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

    We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of major depressive disorder (MDD) in 1221 cases from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study and 1636 screened controls. No genome-wide evidence for association was detected. We also carried out a meta-analysis of three European-ancestry MDD GWAS data sets: STAR*D, Genetics of Recurrent Early-onset Depression and the publicly available Genetic Association Information Network-MDD data set. These data sets, totaling 3957 cases and 3428 controls, were genotyped using four different platforms (Affymetrix 6.0, 5.0 and 500 K, and Perlegen). For each of 2.4 million HapMap II single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using genotyped data where available and imputed data otherwise, single-SNP association tests were carried out in each sample with correction for ancestry-informative principal components. The strongest evidence for association in the meta-analysis was observed for intronic SNPs in ATP6V1B2 (P=6.78 x 10⁻⁷), SP4 (P=7.68 x 10⁻⁷) and GRM7 (P=1.11 x 10⁻⁶). Additional exploratory analyses were carried out for a narrower phenotype (recurrent MDD with onset before age 31, N=2191 cases), and separately for males and females. Several of the best findings were supported primarily by evidence from narrow cases or from either males or females. On the basis of previous biological evidence, we consider GRM7 a strong MDD candidate gene. Larger samples will be required to determine whether any common SNPs are significantly associated with MDD.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0800509; NCRR NIH HHS: U54 RR020278; NIMH NIH HHS: F32 MH082562, MH072802, N01MH90003, R01 MH072802, R01 MH072802-04, R25 MH060482, T32 MH019126, T32 MH019552, T32 MH020006, T32 MH19126, T32 MH19552

    Molecular psychiatry 2011;16;2;202-15

  • Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome.

    Barbe L, Lundberg E, Oksvold P, Stenius A, Lewin E, Björling E, Asplund A, Pontén F, Brismar H, Uhlén M and Andersson-Svahn H

    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2008;7;3;499-508

  • Proteomic and bioinformatic characterization of the biogenesis and function of melanosomes.

    Chi A, Valencia JC, Hu ZZ, Watabe H, Yamaguchi H, Mangini NJ, Huang H, Canfield VA, Cheng KC, Yang F, Abe R, Yamagishi S, Shabanowitz J, Hearing VJ, Wu C, Appella E and Hunt DF

    Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904, USA.

    Melanin, which is responsible for virtually all visible skin, hair, and eye pigmentation in humans, is synthesized, deposited, and distributed in subcellular organelles termed melanosomes. A comprehensive determination of the protein composition of this organelle has been obstructed by the melanin present. Here, we report a novel method of removing melanin that includes in-solution digestion and immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). Together with in-gel digestion, this method has allowed us to characterize melanosome proteomes at various developmental stages by tandem mass spectrometry. Comparative profiling and functional characterization of the melanosome proteomes identified approximately 1500 proteins in melanosomes of all stages, with approximately 600 in any given stage. These proteins include 16 homologous to mouse coat color genes and many associated with human pigmentary diseases. Approximately 100 proteins shared by melanosomes from pigmented and nonpigmented melanocytes define the essential melanosome proteome. Proteins validated by confirming their intracellular localization include PEDF (pigment-epithelium derived factor) and SLC24A5 (sodium/potassium/calcium exchanger 5, NCKX5). The sharing of proteins between melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles suggests a common evolutionary origin. This work represents a model for the study of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles.

    Funded by: NCRR NIH HHS: RR01744; NHGRI NIH HHS: U01-HG02712; NICHD NIH HHS: HD40179; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 37537

    Journal of proteome research 2006;5;11;3135-44

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Neurotransmitter release: the dark side of the vacuolar-H+ATPase.

    Morel N

    Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire, CNRS, 91198 Gif sur Yvette, France. nicolas.morel@nbcm.cnrs-gif.fr

    Vacuolar-H+ATPase (V-ATPase) is a complex enzyme with numerous subunits organized in two domains. The membrane domain V0 contains a proteolipid hexameric ring that translocates protons when ATP is hydrolysed by the catalytic cytoplasmic sector (V1). In nerve terminals, V-ATPase generates an electrochemical proton gradient that is acid and positive inside synaptic vesicles. It is used by specific neurotransmitter-proton antiporters to accumulate neurotransmitters inside their storage organelles. During synaptic activity, neurotransmitters are released from synaptic vesicles docked at specialized portions of the presynaptic plasma membrane, the active zones. A fusion pore opens that allows the neurotransmitter to be released from the synaptic vesicle lumen into the synaptic cleft. We briefly review experimental data suggesting that the membrane domain of V-ATPase could be such a fusion pore. We also discuss the functional implications for quantal neurotransmitter release of the sequential use of the same V-ATPase membrane domain in two different events, neurotransmitter accumulation in synaptic vesicles first, and then release from these organelles during synaptic activity.

    Biology of the cell 2003;95;7;453-7

  • Revised nomenclature for mammalian vacuolar-type H+ -ATPase subunit genes.

    Smith AN, Lovering RC, Futai M, Takeda J, Brown D and Karet FE

    To date, the nomenclature of mammalian genes encoding the numerous subunits and their many isoforms that comprise the family of vacuolar H(+)-ATPases has not been systematic, resulting in confusion both in the literature and among investigators. We present the official new system for these genes, approved by both Human and Mouse Gene Nomenclature Committees.

    Molecular cell 2003;12;4;801-3

  • Subunit rotation of vacuolar-type proton pumping ATPase: relative rotation of the G and C subunits.

    Hirata T, Iwamoto-Kihara A, Sun-Wada GH, Okajima T, Wada Y and Futai M

    Division of Biological Sciences, Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047, Japan.

    Vacuolar-type ATPases V1V0 (V-ATPases) are found ubiquitously in the endomembrane organelles of eukaryotic cells. In this study, we genetically introduced a His tag and a biotin tag onto the c and G subunits, respectively, of Saccharomyces cerevisiae V-ATPase. Using this engineered enzyme, we observed directly the continuous counter-clockwise rotation of an actin filament attached to the G subunit when the enzyme was immobilized on a glass surface through the c subunit. V-ATPase generated essentially the same torque as the F-ATPase (ATP synthase). The rotation was inhibited by concanamycin and nitrate but not by azide. These results demonstrated that the V- and F-ATPase carry out a common rotational catalysis.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;26;23714-9

  • Proton translocation driven by ATP hydrolysis in V-ATPases.

    Kawasaki-Nishi S, Nishi T and Forgac M

    Department of Physiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02111, USA.

    The vacuolar H(+)-ATPases (or V-ATPases) are a family of ATP-dependent proton pumps responsible for acidification of intracellular compartments and, in certain cases, proton transport across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. They are multisubunit complexes composed of a peripheral domain (V(1)) responsible for ATP hydrolysis and an integral domain (V(0)) responsible for proton translocation. Based upon their structural similarity to the F(1)F(0) ATP synthases, the V-ATPases are thought to operate by a rotary mechanism in which ATP hydrolysis in V(1) drives rotation of a ring of proteolipid subunits in V(0). This review is focused on the current structural knowledge of the V-ATPases as it relates to the mechanism of ATP-driven proton translocation.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 34478, R01 GM034478, R37 GM034478

    FEBS letters 2003;545;1;76-85

  • Proteomic analysis of early melanosomes: identification of novel melanosomal proteins.

    Basrur V, Yang F, Kushimoto T, Higashimoto Y, Yasumoto K, Valencia J, Muller J, Vieira WD, Watabe H, Shabanowitz J, Hearing VJ, Hunt DF and Appella E

    Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

    Melanin is a heterogeneous biopolymer produced only by specific cells termed melanocytes, which synthesize and deposit the pigment in specialized membrane-bound organelles known as melanosomes. Although melanosomes have been suspected of being closely related to lysosomes and platelets, the total number of melanosomal proteins is still unknown. Thus far, six melanosome-specific proteins have been identified, and the challenge is to characterize the complete proteome of the melanosome to further understand its mechanism of biogenesis. In this report, we used mass spectrometry and subcellular fractionation to identify protein components of early melanosomes. Using this approach, we have identified all 6 of the known melanosome-specific proteins, 56 proteins that are shared with other organelles, and confirmed the presence of 6 novel melanosomal proteins using western blotting and by immunohistochemistry.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 37537

    Journal of proteome research 2003;2;1;69-79

  • The vacuolar (H+)-ATPases--nature's most versatile proton pumps.

    Nishi T and Forgac M

    Department of Physiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

    The pH of intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells is a carefully controlled parameter that affects many cellular processes, including intracellular membrane transport, prohormone processing and transport of neurotransmitters, as well as the entry of many viruses into cells. The transporters responsible for controlling this crucial parameter in many intracellular compartments are the vacuolar (H+)-ATPases (V-ATPases). Recent advances in our understanding of the structure and regulation of the V-ATPases, together with the mapping of human genetic defects to genes that encode V-ATPase subunits, have led to tremendous excitement in this field.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: R01 GM034478, R37 GM034478

    Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology 2002;3;2;94-103

  • Animal plasma membrane energization by proton-motive V-ATPases.

    Wieczorek H, Brown D, Grinstein S, Ehrenfeld J and Harvey WR

    Department of Biology/Chemistry, University of Osnabrück, D-49069, Osnabrück, Germany.

    Proton-translocating, vacuolar-type ATPases, well known energizers of eukaryotic, vacuolar membranes, now emerge as energizers of many plasma membranes. Just as Na(+) gradients, imposed by Na(+)/K(+) ATPases, energize basolateral plasma membranes of epithelia, so voltage gradients, imposed by H(+) V-ATPases, energize apical plasma membranes. The energized membranes acidify or alkalinize compartments, absorb or secrete ions and fluids, and underwrite cellular homeostasis. V-ATPases acidify extracellular spaces of single cells such as phagocytes and osteoclasts and of polarized epithelia, such as vertebrate kidney and epididymis. They alkalinize extracellular spaces of lepidopteran midgut. V-ATPases energize fluid secretion by insect Malpighian tubules and fluid absorption by insect oocytes. They hyperpolarize external plasma membranes for Na(+) uptake by amphibian skin and fish gills. Indeed, it is likely that ion uptake by osmotically active membranes of all fresh water organisms is energized by V-ATPases. Awareness of plasma membrane energization by V-ATPases provides new perspectives for basic science and presents new opportunities for medicine and agriculture.

    Funded by: NIAID NIH HHS: AI22444; NIDCD NIH HHS: DC42956

    BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology 1999;21;8;637-48

  • Structure and properties of the vacuolar (H+)-ATPases.

    Forgac M

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM 34478, R01 GM034478

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1999;274;19;12951-4

  • Vacuolar and plasma membrane proton-adenosinetriphosphatases.

    Nelson N and Harvey WR

    Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is one of the most fundamental enzymes in nature. It functions in almost every eukaryotic cell and energizes a wide variety of organelles and membranes. V-ATPases have similar structure and mechanism of action with F-ATPase and several of their subunits evolved from common ancestors. In eukaryotic cells, F-ATPases are confined to the semi-autonomous organelles, chloroplasts, and mitochondria, which contain their own genes that encode some of the F-ATPase subunits. In contrast to F-ATPases, whose primary function in eukaryotic cells is to form ATP at the expense of the proton-motive force (pmf), V-ATPases function exclusively as ATP-dependent proton pumps. The pmf generated by V-ATPases in organelles and membranes of eukaryotic cells is utilized as a driving force for numerous secondary transport processes. The mechanistic and structural relations between the two enzymes prompted us to suggest similar functional units in V-ATPase as was proposed to F-ATPase and to assign some of the V-ATPase subunit to one of four parts of a mechanochemical machine: a catalytic unit, a shaft, a hook, and a proton turbine. It was the yeast genetics that allowed the identification of special properties of individual subunits and the discovery of factors that are involved in the enzyme biogenesis and assembly. The V-ATPases play a major role as energizers of animal plasma membranes, especially apical plasma membranes of epithelial cells. This role was first recognized in plasma membranes of lepidopteran midgut and vertebrate kidney. The list of animals with plasma membranes that are energized by V-ATPases now includes members of most, if not all, animal phyla. This includes the classical Na+ absorption by frog skin, male fertility through acidification of the sperm acrosome and the male reproductive tract, bone resorption by mammalian osteoclasts, and regulation of eye pressure. V-ATPase may function in Na+ uptake by trout gills and energizes water secretion by contractile vacuoles in Dictyostelium. V-ATPase was first detected in organelles connected with the vacuolar system. It is the main if not the only primary energy source for numerous transport systems in these organelles. The driving force for the accumulation of neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles is pmf generated by V-ATPase. The acidification of lysosomes, which are required for the proper function of most of their enzymes, is provided by V-ATPase. The enzyme is also vital for the proper function of endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast to yeast vacuoles that maintain an internal pH of approximately 5.5, it is believed that the vacuoles of lemon fruit may have a pH as low as 2. Similarly, some brown and red alga maintain internal pH as low as 0.1 in their vacuoles. One of the outstanding questions in the field is how such a conserved enzyme as the V-ATPase can fulfill such diverse functions.

    Funded by: NIAID NIH HHS: AI-22444

    Physiological reviews 1999;79;2;361-85

  • Introduction: V-ATPases 1992-1998.

    Kane PM

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, SUNY Health Science Center, Syracuse, New York 13210, USA.

    Journal of bioenergetics and biomembranes 1999;31;1;3-5

  • The vacuolar H+-ATPase: a universal proton pump of eukaryotes.

    Finbow ME and Harrison MA

    CRC Beatson Laboratories, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland, U.K.

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) is a universal component of eukaryotic organisms. It is present in the membranes of many organelles, where its proton-pumping action creates the low intra-vacuolar pH found, for example, in lysosomes. In addition, there are a number of differentiated cell types that have V-ATPases on their surface that contribute to the physiological functions of these cells. The V-ATPase is a multi-subunit enzyme composed of a membrane sector and a cytosolic catalytic sector. It is related to the familiar FoF1 ATP synthase (F-ATPase), having the same basic architectural construction, and many of the subunits from the two display identity with one another. All the core subunits of the V-ATPase have now been identified and much is known about the assembly, regulation and pharmacology of the enzyme. Recent genetic analysis has shown the V-ATPase to be a vital component of higher eukaryotes. At least one of the subunits, i.e. subunit c (ductin), may have multifunctional roles in membrane transport, providing a possible pathway of communication between cells. The structure of the membrane sector is known in some detail, and it is possible to begin to suggest how proton pumping is coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    The Biochemical journal 1997;324 ( Pt 3);697-712

  • Structure, function and regulation of the vacuolar (H+)-ATPase.

    Stevens TH and Forgac M

    Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene 97403-1229, USA. stevens@molbio.uoregon.edu

    The vacuolar (H+)-ATPases (or V-ATPases) function in the acidification of intracellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. The V-ATPases are multisubunit complexes composed of two functional domains. The peripheral V1 domain, a 500-kDa complex responsible for ATP hydrolysis, contains at least eight different subunits of molecular weight 70-13 (subunits A-H). The integral V0 domain, a 250-kDa complex, functions in proton translocation and contains at least five different subunits of molecular weight 100-17 (subunits a-d). Biochemical and genetic analysis has been used to identify subunits and residues involved in nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, proton translocation, and coupling of these activities. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of vacuolar acidification in vivo, including control of pump density, regulation of assembly of V1 and V0 domains, disulfide bond formation, activator or inhibitor proteins, and regulation of counterion conductance. Recent information concerning targeting and regulation of V-ATPases has also been obtained.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: R01 GM034478

    Annual review of cell and developmental biology 1997;13;779-808

  • Transcriptional regulation of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase B2 subunit gene in differentiating THP-1 cells.

    Lee BS, Underhill DM, Crane MK and Gluck SL

    Department of Medicine/Renal Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

    Monocyte-macrophage differentiation was used as a model system for studying gene regulation of the human vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). We examined mRNA levels of various V-ATPase subunits during differentiation of both native monocytes and the cell line THP-1, and found that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms could account for increases in cell V-ATPase content. From nuclear runoff experiments, we found that one subunit in particular, the B2 isoform (Mr = 56,000), was amplified primarily by transcriptional means. We have begun to examine the structure of the B2 subunit promoter region. Isolation and sequencing of the first exon and 5'-flanking region of this gene reveal a TATA-less promoter with a high G + C content. Primer extension and ribonuclease protection analyses indicate a single major transcriptional start site. We transfected promoter-luciferase reporter plasmids into THP-1 cells to define sequences that mediate transcriptional control during monocyte differentiation. We found that sequences downstream from the transcriptional start site were sufficient to confer increased expression during THP-1 differentiation. DNase I footprinting and sequence analysis revealed the existence of multiple AP2 and Sp1 binding sites in the 5'-untranslated and proximal coding regions.

    Funded by: NIAMS NIH HHS: AR32087; NIDDK NIH HHS: DK09976, DK38848; ...

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1995;270;13;7320-9

  • Heterogeneity of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase: differential expression of two human subunit B isoforms.

    van Hille B, Richener H, Schmid P, Puettner I, Green JR and Bilbe G

    CIBA-GEIGY A.G., Basel, Switzerland.

    The catalytic domain of the vacuolar proton ATPase is composed of a hexamer of three A subunits and three B subunits. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a cDNA isoform of subunit B, HO57, from an osteoclastoma cDNA library. HO57 is represented by three species of mRNA of 1.6, 2.6 and 2.8 kb and is expressed at low levels in a range of human tissues, but at significantly higher levels in brain, kidney and osteoclastoma, and is probably an ubiquitously expressed isoform. In contrast, the kidney-specific isoform has an mRNA of 2 kb and is specifically expressed at high levels only in kidney and, at a lower level, in placenta. Thus the HO57 isoform is integral to the vacuolar ATPase found in the general secretory system of all cells as well as in vacuolar-ATPase-rich sources such as neurones and osteoclasts, whereas both the kidney-specific isoform and HO57 are highly expressed in the kidney. Furthermore, we show by in situ hybridization that HO57 is the only isoform that is exclusively and highly expressed by osteoclasts.

    The Biochemical journal 1994;303 ( Pt 1);191-8

  • Selectively amplified expression of an isoform of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase 56-kilodalton subunit in renal intercalated cells.

    Nelson RD, Guo XL, Masood K, Brown D, Kalkbrenner M and Gluck S

    Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.

    The intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct are specialized for physiologically regulated proton transport. In these cells, a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase is expressed at enormous levels in a polarized distribution on the plasma membrane, enabling it to serve in transepithelial H+ transport. In contrast, in most eukaryotic cells, vacuolar H(+)-ATPases reside principally in intracellular compartments to effect vacuolar acidification. To investigate the basis for the selective amplification of the proton pump in intercalated cells, we isolated and sequenced cDNA clones for two isoforms of the approximately 56-kDa subunit of the H(+)-ATPase and examined their expression in various tissues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the isoforms was highly conserved in the internal region but diverged in the amino and carboxyl termini. mRNA hybridization to a cDNA probe for one isoform (the "kidney" isoform) was detected only in kidney cortex and medulla, whereas mRNA hybridization to the other isoform of the approximately 56-kDa subunit and to the H(+)-ATPase 31-kDa subunit was found in the kidney and other tissues. Immunocytochemistry of rat kidney with an antibody specific to the kidney isoform revealed intense staining only in the intercalated cells. Staining was absent from proximal tubule and thick ascending limb, where H(+)-ATPase was detected with a monoclonal antibody to the 31-kDa subunit of the H(+)-ATPase. This example of specific amplification of an isoform of one subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase being limited to a specific cell type suggests that the selective expression of the kidney isoform of the approximately 56-kDa subunit may confer the capacity for amplification and other specialized functions of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase in the renal intercalated cell.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK09976, DK38848, DK40535

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 1992;89;8;3541-5

  • An mRNA from human brain encodes an isoform of the B subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    Bernasconi P, Rausch T, Struve I, Morgan L and Taiz L

    Biology Department, Sinsheimer Laboratories, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.

    The B subunit (approximately 60 kDa) of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase is one of the two major subunits comprising the hydrophilic catalytic complex of the enzyme. Using left and catalytic complex of the enzyme. Using left and right primers which bind two highly conserved sequences of the B subunit, an 836-base pair fragment was amplified from human brain cDNA by the polymerase chain reaction. The amplified fragment was used to probe a Northern blot and to screen a brain cDNA library. A single RNA band, 3.2 kilobases (kb) in length, was detected on Northern blots. A positive cDNA clone containing a 2.5-kb insert was isolated and sequenced. It included a long 3'-untranslated region (greater than 1.2 kb) and was missing a minor portion of the 5'-end of the coding region. The coding region of the brain cDNA sequence was 77% identical at the nucleotide level and 90% identical at the amino acid level to the previously reported sequence for the B subunit of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase from human kidney (Sudhof, T. C., Fried, V. A., Stone, D. K., Johnston, P. A., and Xie, X.-S. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci, U. S. A. 86, 6067-6071). Within the coding region of the brain cDNA, which is 6 amino acid residues shorter at the 3'-end than the kidney sequence, an 11% difference in the GC content was calculated. The 3'-noncoding sequence of the brain cDNA was completely unrelated to that of kidney and was three times longer. We conclude that the B subunit cDNAs from human kidney and brain represent different isoforms. This is the first demonstration of an isoform of a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1990;265;29;17428-31

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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