G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001534
Gene symbol
DNAJC11 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily C, member 11
Orthologue
G00000285 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000001443 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000007923 (Ensembl human gene)
55735 (Entrez Gene)
618 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DNAJC11 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:25570 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9NVH1 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • FLJ10737

Literature (9)

Pubmed - other

  • OWL1: an Arabidopsis J-domain protein involved in perception of very low light fluences.

    Kneissl J, Wachtler V, Chua NH and Bolle C

    Institute of Botany, Department for Biology I, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried, Germany.

    To sense ambient light conditions in order to optimize their growth and development, plants employ a battery of photoreceptors responsive to light quality and quantity. Essential for the sensing of red and far-red (FR) light is the phytochrome family of photoreceptors. Among them, phytochrome A is special because it mediates responses to different light conditions, including both very low fluences (very low fluence response [VLFR]) and high irradiances (high irradiance response [HIR]). In contrast with the FR-HIR signaling pathway, in which several intermediates of the signaling pathway have been identified, specific components of the VLFR pathway remain unknown. Here, we describe owl1 (for orientation under very low fluences of light), a mutant that is specific for the VLFR, suggesting that VLFR and HIR pathways are genetically distinct, although some common mechanisms can be observed. OWL1 codes for a ubiquitous J-domain protein essential for germination, cotyledon opening, hypocotyl elongation, and deviation of the direction of hypocotyl growth from the vertical under very low light conditions. Additionally, we observed a flowering phenotype suggesting a role for the VLFR during the whole life cycle of a plant. OWL1 interacts with the basic helix-loop-helix HFR1 (LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR-RED) transcription factor, previously characterized as a component of the FR-HIR pathway. Both proteins are involved in the agravitropic response under FR light. We propose a central function of OWL1 in the VLFR pathway, which is essential for plant survival under unfavorable light conditions.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM44640, R01 GM044640, R56 GM044640

    The Plant cell 2009;21;10;3212-25

  • The mitochondrial inner membrane protein mitofilin exists as a complex with SAM50, metaxins 1 and 2, coiled-coil-helix coiled-coil-helix domain-containing protein 3 and 6 and DnaJC11.

    Xie J, Marusich MF, Souda P, Whitelegge J and Capaldi RA

    Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA. cxjing@uoregon.edu

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been produced which reacts with human mitofilin, a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. This mAb immunocaptures its target protein in association with six other proteins, metaxins 1 and 2, SAM50, CHCHD3, CHCHD6 and DnaJC11, respectively. The first three are outer membrane proteins, CHCHD3 has been assigned to the matrix space, and the other two proteins have not been described in mitochondria previously. The functional role of this new complex is uncertain. However, a role in protein import related to maintenance of mitochondrial structure is suggested as mitofilin helps regulate mitochondrial morphology and at least four of the associated proteins (metaxins 1 and 2, SAM50 and CHCHD3) have been implicated in protein import, while DnaJC11 is a chaperone-like protein that may have a similar role.

    FEBS letters 2007;581;18;3545-9

  • Allelic variants of CAMTA1 and FLJ10737 within a commonly deleted region at 1p36 in neuroblastoma.

    Henrich KO, Claas A, Praml C, Benner A, Mollenhauer J, Poustka A, Schwab M and Westermann F

    Division of Tumour Genetics B030, German Cancer Research Center DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. k.henrich@dkfz.de

    Deletion of a distal portion of 1p is seen in a wide range of human malignancies, including neuroblastoma. Here, a 1p36.3 commonly deleted region of 216 kb has been defined encompassing two genes, CAMTA1 and FLJ10737. Low expression of CAMTA1 has been recently shown to be an independent predictor of poor outcome in neuroblastoma patients. The present study surveys CAMTA1 and FLJ10737 for genetic alterations by fluorescence-based single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) using a panel of DNAs from 88 neuroblastomas, their matching blood samples and 97 unaffected individuals. Nucleotide variants encoding amino acid substitutions were found in both genes. One CAMTA1 variant (T1336I) was not detected in 97 unaffected individuals, another (N1177K) resides in a conserved domain of the CAMTA1 protein and was found hemizygous in six neuroblastomas. We found no evidence for somatic mutations in FLJ10737 or CAMTA1. Further investigations are needed to address the functional impact of the identified variants and their possible significance for neuroblastoma.

    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) 2007;43;3;607-16

  • The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    Gregory SG, Barlow KF, McLay KE, Kaul R, Swarbreck D, Dunham A, Scott CE, Howe KL, Woodfine K, Spencer CC, Jones MC, Gillson C, Searle S, Zhou Y, Kokocinski F, McDonald L, Evans R, Phillips K, Atkinson A, Cooper R, Jones C, Hall RE, Andrews TD, Lloyd C, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Ambrose KD, Anderson F, Andrew RW, Ashwell RI, Aubin K, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Beasley H, Bethel G, Bird CP, Bray-Allen S, Brown JY, Brown AJ, Buckley D, Burton J, Bye J, Carder C, Chapman JC, Clark SY, Clarke G, Clee C, Cobley V, Collier RE, Corby N, Coville GJ, Davies J, Deadman R, Dunn M, Earthrowl M, Ellington AG, Errington H, Frankish A, Frankland J, French L, Garner P, Garnett J, Gay L, Ghori MR, Gibson R, Gilby LM, Gillett W, Glithero RJ, Grafham DV, Griffiths C, Griffiths-Jones S, Grocock R, Hammond S, Harrison ES, Hart E, Haugen E, Heath PD, Holmes S, Holt K, Howden PJ, Hunt AR, Hunt SE, Hunter G, Isherwood J, James R, Johnson C, Johnson D, Joy A, Kay M, Kershaw JK, Kibukawa M, Kimberley AM, King A, Knights AJ, Lad H, Laird G, Lawlor S, Leongamornlert DA, Lloyd DM, Loveland J, Lovell J, Lush MJ, Lyne R, Martin S, Mashreghi-Mohammadi M, Matthews L, Matthews NS, McLaren S, Milne S, Mistry S, Moore MJ, Nickerson T, O'Dell CN, Oliver K, Palmeiri A, Palmer SA, Parker A, Patel D, Pearce AV, Peck AI, Pelan S, Phelps K, Phillimore BJ, Plumb R, Rajan J, Raymond C, Rouse G, Saenphimmachak C, Sehra HK, Sheridan E, Shownkeen R, Sims S, Skuce CD, Smith M, Steward C, Subramanian S, Sycamore N, Tracey A, Tromans A, Van Helmond Z, Wall M, Wallis JM, White S, Whitehead SL, Wilkinson JE, Willey DL, Williams H, Wilming L, Wray PW, Wu Z, Coulson A, Vaudin M, Sulston JE, Durbin R, Hubbard T, Wooster R, Dunham I, Carter NP, McVean G, Ross MT, Harrow J, Olson MV, Beck S, Rogers J, Bentley DR, Banerjee R, Bryant SP, Burford DC, Burrill WD, Clegg SM, Dhami P, Dovey O, Faulkner LM, Gribble SM, Langford CF, Pandian RD, Porter KM and Prigmore E

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. sgregory@chg.duhs.duke.edu

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0000107; Wellcome Trust

    Nature 2006;441;7091;315-21

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Identification and characterization of FLJ10737 and CAMTA1 genes on the commonly deleted region of neuroblastoma at human chromosome 1p36.31-p36.23.

    Katoh M and Katoh M

    M & M Medical BioInformatics, Narashino 275-0022, Japan. mkatoh@ncc.go.jp

    Tumor suppressor genes of neuroblastoma are located at human chromosome 1p36, 4p16, 11q23.3, and 14q32. We have previously cloned and characterized MFRP and RNF26 genes at 11q23.3. Here, we searched for genes within the 1p36.31-p36.23 commonly deleted region between microsatellite markers D1S2731 and D1S2666 by using bioinformatics. D1S2731 was located within FLJ10737 gene, consisting of 16 exons. D1S2666 was located within CAMTA1 gene, consisting of 23 exons. FLJ10737 and CAMTA1 genes were located in the head-to-head manner with an interval of about 83 kb. Exons 1-10 of FLJ10737 gene as well as exons 1-5 of CAMTA1 gene were located within the 1p36.31-p36.23 commonly deleted region. FLJ10737 (559 aa) was found to consist of the DnaJ domain, bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS), FADH domain, and FEMCA domain. Mouse E030019A03, zebrafish MGC55845, Drosophila CG8531 and Arabidopsis At2g35720 were homologs of human FLJ10737. FADH domain was conserved among vertebrate FLJ10737 orthologs as well as human AD-015, mouse Histocompatibility 47, and rat Ratsg2. KIAA0833 was the representative human CAMTA1 cDNA. Nucleotide sequence of mouse Camta1 cDNA was determined in silico by assembling nucleotide sequences of BY733411, BU610694 ESTs and AK122383 cDNA. Human CAMTA1 (1673 aa) and mouse Camta1 (1682 aa) showed 94.1% total-amino-acid identity. CAMTA1 was a Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) family protein, consisting of CG-1 domain, TIG domain, ankyrin repeats, and IQ motifs. FLJ10737 and CAMTA1 genes on 1p36.31-p36.23 are candidate tumor suppressor genes of neuroblastoma.

    International journal of oncology 2003;23;4;1219-24

  • Large-scale concatenation cDNA sequencing.

    Yu W, Andersson B, Worley KC, Muzny DM, Ding Y, Liu W, Ricafrente JY, Wentland MA, Lennon G and Gibbs RA

    A total of 100 kb of DNA derived from 69 individual human brain cDNA clones of 0.7-2.0 kb were sequenced by concatenated cDNA sequencing (CCS), whereby multiple individual DNA fragments are sequenced simultaneously in a single shotgun library. The method yielded accurate sequences and a similar efficiency compared with other shotgun libraries constructed from single DNA fragments (> 20 kb). Computer analyses were carried out on 65 cDNA clone sequences and their corresponding end sequences to examine both nucleic acid and amino acid sequence similarities in the databases. Thirty-seven clones revealed no DNA database matches, 12 clones generated exact matches (> or = 98% identity), and 16 clones generated nonexact matches (57%-97% identity) to either known human or other species genes. Of those 28 matched clones, 8 had corresponding end sequences that failed to identify similarities. In a protein similarity search, 27 clone sequences displayed significant matches, whereas only 20 of the end sequences had matches to known protein sequences. Our data indicate that full-length cDNA insert sequences provide significantly more nucleic acid and protein sequence similarity matches than expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for database searching.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: 1F32 HG00169-01, F32 HG000169, F33 HG000210, P30 HG00210-05, R01 HG00823, U54 HG003273

    Genome research 1997;7;4;353-8

  • A "double adaptor" method for improved shotgun library construction.

    Andersson B, Wentland MA, Ricafrente JY, Liu W and Gibbs RA

    Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas, 77030, USA.

    The efficiency of shotgun DNA sequencing depends to a great extent on the quality of the random-subclone libraries used. We here describe a novel "double adaptor" strategy for efficient construction of high-quality shotgun libraries. In this method, randomly sheared and end-repaired fragments are ligated to oligonucleotide adaptors creating 12-base overhangs. Nonphosphorylated oligonucleotides are used, which prevents formation of adaptor dimers and ensures efficient ligation of insert to adaptor. The vector is prepared from a modified M13 vector, by KpnI/PstI digestion followed by ligation to oligonucleotides with ends complementary to the overhangs created in the digest. These adaptors create 5'-overhangs complementary to those on the inserts. Following annealing of insert to vector, the DNA is directly used for transformation without a ligation step. This protocol is robust and shows three- to fivefold higher yield of clones compared to previous protocols. No chimeric clones can be detected and the background of clones without an insert is <1%. The procedure is rapid and shows potential for automation.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: R01 HG00823

    Analytical biochemistry 1996;236;1;107-13

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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