G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001489
Gene symbol
CIT (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
citron (rho-interacting, serine/threonine kinase 21)
Orthologue
G00000240 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000122966 (Ensembl human gene)
11113 (Entrez Gene)
81 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
CIT (GeneCards)
Literature
605629 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:1985 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O14578 (UniProt)

Synonyms (3)

  • CRIK
  • KIAA0949
  • STK21

Literature (19)

Pubmed - other

  • Case-control association study of 65 candidate genes revealed a possible association of a SNP of HTR5A to be a factor susceptible to bipolar disease in Bulgarian population.

    Yosifova A, Mushiroda T, Stoianov D, Vazharova R, Dimova I, Karachanak S, Zaharieva I, Milanova V, Madjirova N, Gerdjikov I, Tolev T, Velkova S, Kirov G, Owen MJ, O'Donovan MC, Toncheva D and Nakamura Y

    Laboratory for International Alliance, RIKEN Center for Genomic Medicine, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Japan.

    Background: Bipolar affective disorder (BAD) is a psychiatric illness characterized by episodes of mania and depression. Although the etiology is not clear, epidemiological studies suggest it is a result of an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Despite of enormous efforts and abundant studies conducted, none has yet been identified definitively a gene susceptible to bipolar disorder.

    Methods: Ninety-four Bulgarian patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 184 Bulgarian healthy individuals, were used for genotyping of 191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by TaqMan and/or Invader assays. Seventeen SNPs that revealed P value less than 0.05 in the first screening were genotyped using an additional independent set of samples, consisting of 78 BAD cases and 372 controls.

    Results: After applying the Bonferonni correction on genotyping results of 172 cases and 556 controls, only one SNP, rs1800883, in the HTR5A gene revealed a significant level of P value (P=0.000097; odds ratio=1.80 (95%CI, 1.27-2.54); corrected P=0.017).

    Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HTR5A gene could play an important role in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder in our population. However these findings should be viewed with caution and replication studies in other populations are necessary in support of these findings.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0800509

    Journal of affective disorders 2009;117;1-2;87-97

  • ASPM and citron kinase co-localize to the midbody ring during cytokinesis.

    Paramasivam M, Chang YJ and LoTurco JJ

    Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA.

    Mutations in ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) and citron kinase (CITK) cause primary microcephaly in humans and rodents, respectively. Both proteins are expressed during neurogenesis and play important roles in neuronal progenitor cell division. ASPM is localized to the spindle pole, and is essential for maintaining proliferative cell division. CITK is present at the cytokinesis furrow and midbody ring, and it is essential for cellular abscission. We report here that ASPM also localizes to the midbody ring in mammalian cells. ASPM co-localizes with CITK at the midbody ring and coimmunoprecipitates with CITK in lysates prepared from HeLa cells and embryonic neuroepithelium. Furthermore, a GFP-tagged fragment of the N-terminus of ASPM localizes to centrosomes and spindle poles, while a GFP-tagged fragment of the C-terminus localizes to midbodies. All reported ASPM mutations that cause microcephaly involve a truncation or mutation of the C-terminus. In addition, at least two other microcephaly-related proteins, CENPJ and CDK5RAP2, previously localized to spindle poles, also localize to midbodies. Together our observations support a model of neurogenesis in which spindle dynamics and cellular abscission are coordinated.

    Funded by: NIMH NIH HHS: MH056524

    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 2007;6;13;1605-12

  • Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.

    Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, Macek B, Kumar C, Mortensen P and Mann M

    Center for Experimental BioInformatics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark.

    Cell signaling mechanisms often transmit information via posttranslational protein modifications, most importantly reversible protein phosphorylation. Here we develop and apply a general mass spectrometric technology for identification and quantitation of phosphorylation sites as a function of stimulus, time, and subcellular location. We have detected 6,600 phosphorylation sites on 2,244 proteins and have determined their temporal dynamics after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and recorded them in the Phosida database. Fourteen percent of phosphorylation sites are modulated at least 2-fold by EGF, and these were classified by their temporal profiles. Surprisingly, a majority of proteins contain multiple phosphorylation sites showing different kinetics, suggesting that they serve as platforms for integrating signals. In addition to protein kinase cascades, the targets of reversible phosphorylation include ubiquitin ligases, guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and at least 46 different transcriptional regulators. The dynamic phosphoproteome provides a missing link in a global, integrative view of cellular regulation.

    Cell 2006;127;3;635-48

  • Phosphoproteome analysis of the human mitotic spindle.

    Nousiainen M, Silljé HH, Sauer G, Nigg EA and Körner R

    Department of Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany.

    During cell division, the mitotic spindle segregates the sister chromatids into two nascent cells, such that each daughter cell inherits one complete set of chromosomes. Errors in spindle formation can result in both chromosome missegregation and cytokinesis defects and hence lead to genomic instability. To ensure the correct function of the spindle, the activity and localization of spindle associated proteins has to be tightly regulated in time and space. Reversible phosphorylation has been shown to be one of the key regulatory mechanisms for the organization of the mitotic spindle. The relatively low number of identified in vivo phosphorylation sites of spindle components, however, has hampered functional analysis of regulatory spindle networks. A more complete inventory of the phosphorylation sites of spindle-associated proteins would therefore constitute an important advance. Here, we describe the mass spectrometry-based identification of in vivo phosphorylation sites from purified human mitotic spindles. In total, 736 phosphorylation sites were identified, of which 312 could be attributed to known spindle proteins. Among these are phosphorylation sites that were previously shown to be important for the regulation of spindle-associated proteins. Importantly, this data set also comprises 279 novel phosphorylation sites of known spindle proteins for future functional studies. This inventory of spindle phosphorylation sites should thus make an important contribution to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation, function, and integrity of the mitotic spindle.

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2006;103;14;5391-6

  • The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Scherer SE, Muzny DM, Buhay CJ, Chen R, Cree A, Ding Y, Dugan-Rocha S, Gill R, Gunaratne P, Harris RA, Hawes AC, Hernandez J, Hodgson AV, Hume J, Jackson A, Khan ZM, Kovar-Smith C, Lewis LR, Lozado RJ, Metzker ML, Milosavljevic A, Miner GR, Montgomery KT, Morgan MB, Nazareth LV, Scott G, Sodergren E, Song XZ, Steffen D, Lovering RC, Wheeler DA, Worley KC, Yuan Y, Zhang Z, Adams CQ, Ansari-Lari MA, Ayele M, Brown MJ, Chen G, Chen Z, Clerc-Blankenburg KP, Davis C, Delgado O, Dinh HH, Draper H, Gonzalez-Garay ML, Havlak P, Jackson LR, Jacob LS, Kelly SH, Li L, Li Z, Liu J, Liu W, Lu J, Maheshwari M, Nguyen BV, Okwuonu GO, Pasternak S, Perez LM, Plopper FJ, Santibanez J, Shen H, Tabor PE, Verduzco D, Waldron L, Wang Q, Williams GA, Zhang J, Zhou J, Allen CC, Amin AG, Anyalebechi V, Bailey M, Barbaria JA, Bimage KE, Bryant NP, Burch PE, Burkett CE, Burrell KL, Calderon E, Cardenas V, Carter K, Casias K, Cavazos I, Cavazos SR, Ceasar H, Chacko J, Chan SN, Chavez D, Christopoulos C, Chu J, Cockrell R, Cox CD, Dang M, Dathorne SR, David R, Davis CM, Davy-Carroll L, Deshazo DR, Donlin JE, D'Souza L, Eaves KA, Egan A, Emery-Cohen AJ, Escotto M, Flagg N, Forbes LD, Gabisi AM, Garza M, Hamilton C, Henderson N, Hernandez O, Hines S, Hogues ME, Huang M, Idlebird DG, Johnson R, Jolivet A, Jones S, Kagan R, King LM, Leal B, Lebow H, Lee S, LeVan JM, Lewis LC, London P, Lorensuhewa LM, Loulseged H, Lovett DA, Lucier A, Lucier RL, Ma J, Madu RC, Mapua P, Martindale AD, Martinez E, Massey E, Mawhiney S, Meador MG, Mendez S, Mercado C, Mercado IC, Merritt CE, Miner ZL, Minja E, Mitchell T, Mohabbat F, Mohabbat K, Montgomery B, Moore N, Morris S, Munidasa M, Ngo RN, Nguyen NB, Nickerson E, Nwaokelemeh OO, Nwokenkwo S, Obregon M, Oguh M, Oragunye N, Oviedo RJ, Parish BJ, Parker DN, Parrish J, Parks KL, Paul HA, Payton BA, Perez A, Perrin W, Pickens A, Primus EL, Pu LL, Puazo M, Quiles MM, Quiroz JB, Rabata D, Reeves K, Ruiz SJ, Shao H, Sisson I, Sonaike T, Sorelle RP, Sutton AE, Svatek AF, Svetz LA, Tamerisa KS, Taylor TR, Teague B, Thomas N, Thorn RD, Trejos ZY, Trevino BK, Ukegbu ON, Urban JB, Vasquez LI, Vera VA, Villasana DM, Wang L, Ward-Moore S, Warren JT, Wei X, White F, Williamson AL, Wleczyk R, Wooden HS, Wooden SH, Yen J, Yoon L, Yoon V, Zorrilla SE, Nelson D, Kucherlapati R, Weinstock G, Gibbs RA and Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center Sequence Production Team

    Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. sscherer@bcm.tmc.edu

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: U54 HG003273

    Nature 2006;440;7082;346-51

  • KIF14 and citron kinase act together to promote efficient cytokinesis.

    Gruneberg U, Neef R, Li X, Chan EH, Chalamalasetty RB, Nigg EA and Barr FA

    Department of Cell Biology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany.

    Multiple mitotic kinesins and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) act in concert to direct cytokinesis (Glotzer, M. 2005. Science. 307:1735-1739). In anaphase cells, many of these proteins associate with an antiparallel array of microtubules termed the central spindle. The MAP and microtubule-bundling protein PRC1 (protein-regulating cytokinesis 1) is one of the key molecules required for the integrity of this structure (Jiang, W., G. Jimenez, N.J. Wells, T.J. Hope, G.M. Wahl, T. Hunter, and R. Fukunaga. 1998. Mol. Cell. 2:877-885; Mollinari, C., J.P. Kleman, W. Jiang, G. Schoehn, T. Hunter, and R.L. Margolis. 2002. J. Cell Biol. 157:1175-1186). In this study, we identify an interaction between endogenous PRC1 and the previously uncharacterized kinesin KIF14 as well as other mitotic kinesins (MKlp1/CHO1, MKlp2, and KIF4) with known functions in cytokinesis (Hill, E., M. Clarke, and F.A. Barr. 2000. EMBO J. 19:5711-5719; Matuliene, J., and R. Kuriyama. 2002. Mol. Biol. Cell. 13:1832-1845; Kurasawa, Y., W.C. Earnshaw, Y. Mochizuki, N. Dohmae, and K. Todokoro. 2004. EMBO J. 23:3237-3248). We find that KIF14 targets to the central spindle via its interaction with PRC1 and has an essential function in cytokinesis. In KIF14-depleted cells, citron kinase but not other components of the central spindle and cleavage furrow fail to localize. Furthermore, the localization of KIF14 and citron kinase to the central spindle and midbody is codependent, and they form a complex depending on the activation state of citron kinase. Contrary to a previous study (Di Cunto, F., S. Imarisio, E. Hirsch, V. Broccoli, A. Bulfone, A. Migheli, C. Atzori, E. Turco, R. Triolo, G.P. Dotto, et al. 2000. Neuron. 28:115-127), we find a general requirement for citron kinase in human cell division. Together, these findings identify a novel pathway required for efficient cytokinesis.

    The Journal of cell biology 2006;172;3;363-72

  • Evidence of association between bipolar disorder and Citron on chromosome 12q24.

    Lyons-Warren A, Chang JJ, Balkissoon R, Kamiya A, Garant M, Nurnberger J, Scheftner W, Reich T, McMahon F, Kelsoe J, Gershon E, Coryell W, Byerley W, Berrettini W, Depaulo R, McInnis M and Sawa A

    Molecular psychiatry 2005;10;9;807-9

  • Hot-spot residue in small heat-shock protein 22 causes distal motor neuropathy.

    Irobi J, Van Impe K, Seeman P, Jordanova A, Dierick I, Verpoorten N, Michalik A, De Vriendt E, Jacobs A, Van Gerwen V, Vennekens K, Mazanec R, Tournev I, Hilton-Jones D, Talbot K, Kremensky I, Van Den Bosch L, Robberecht W, Van Vandekerckhove J, Van Broeckhoven C, Gettemans J, De Jonghe P and Timmerman V

    Department of Molecular Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerpen, Belgium.

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies are pure motor disorders of the peripheral nervous system resulting in severe atrophy and wasting of distal limb muscles. In two pedigrees with distal hereditary motor neuropathy type II linked to chromosome 12q24.3, we identified the same mutation (K141N) in small heat-shock 22-kDa protein 8 (encoded by HSPB8; also called HSP22). We found a second mutation (K141E) in two smaller families. Both mutations target the same amino acid, which is essential to the structural and functional integrity of the small heat-shock protein alphaA-crystallin. This positively charged residue, when mutated in other small heat-shock proteins, results in various human disorders. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed greater binding of both HSPB8 mutants to the interacting partner HSPB1. Expression of mutant HSPB8 in cultured cells promoted formation of intracellular aggregates. Our findings provide further evidence that mutations in heat-shock proteins have an important role in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;6;597-601

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • RhoE binds to ROCK I and inhibits downstream signaling.

    Riento K, Guasch RM, Garg R, Jin B and Ridley AJ

    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Royal Free and University College School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

    RhoE belongs to the Rho GTPase family, the members of which control actin cytoskeletal dynamics. RhoE induces stress fiber disassembly in a variety of cell types, whereas RhoA stimulates stress fiber assembly. The similarity of RhoE and RhoA sequences suggested that RhoE might compete with RhoA for interaction with its targets. Here, we show that RhoE binds ROCK I but none of the other RhoA targets tested. The interaction of RhoE with ROCK I was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation of the endogenous proteins, and the two proteins colocalized on the trans-Golgi network in COS-7 cells. Although RhoE and RhoA were not able to bind ROCK I simultaneously, RhoE bound to the amino-terminal region of ROCK I encompassing the kinase domain, at a site distant from the carboxy-terminal RhoA-binding site. Overexpression of RhoE inhibited ROCK I-induced stress fiber formation and phosphorylation of the ROCK I target myosin light chain phosphatase. These data suggest that RhoE induces stress fiber disassembly by directly binding ROCK I and inhibiting it from phosphorylating downstream targets.

    Molecular and cellular biology 2003;23;12;4219-29

  • Citron kinase is a cell cycle-dependent, nuclear protein required for G2/M transition of hepatocytes.

    Liu H, Di Cunto F, Imarisio S and Reid LM

    Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, 27599, USA.

    Citron Kinase (Citron-K) is a cell cycle-dependent protein regulating the G(2)/M transition in hepatocytes. Synchronization studies demonstrated that expression of the Citron-K protein starts at the late S and/or the early G(2) phase after that of cyclin B1. Expression of Citron-K is developmentally regulated. Levels of Citron-K mRNA and protein are highest in embryonic liver and gradually decrease after birth. Citron-K exists in interphase nuclei and begins to disperse into the cytoplasm at prophase. It concentrates at the cleavage furrow and midbody during anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis, implicating a role in the control of cytokinesis. However, studies with knockouts show that Citron-K is not essential for cytokinesis in hepatocytes. Instead, loss of Citron-K causes a significant increase of G(2) tetraploid nuclei in one-week-old rat and mouse liver. In addition, Citron-K deficiency triggers apoptosis in a small subset of embryonic liver cells. In summary, our data demonstrate that Citron-K has a distinct cell cycle-dependent expression pattern and cellular localization as a downstream target of Rho-GTPase and functions in the control of G(2)/M transition in the hepatocyte cell cycle.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: 1 R01 DK52851

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;4;2541-8

  • Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC-1): mutant truncation prevents binding to NudE-like (NUDEL) and inhibits neurite outgrowth.

    Ozeki Y, Tomoda T, Kleiderlein J, Kamiya A, Bord L, Fujii K, Okawa M, Yamada N, Hatten ME, Snyder SH, Ross CA and Sawa A

    Division of Neurobiology and Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC-1) is a gene whose mutant truncation is associated with major psychiatric illness with a predominance of schizophrenic symptomatology. We have cloned and characterized rodent DISC-1. DISC-1 expression displays pronounced developmental regulation with the highest levels in late embryonic life when the cerebral cortex develops. In yeast two-hybrid analyses, DISC-1 interacts with a variety of cytoskeletal proteins. One of these, NudE-like (NUDEL), is associated with cortical development and is linked to LIS-1, the disease gene for a form of lissencephaly, a disorder of cortical development. The disease mutant form of DISC-1 fails to bind NUDEL. Expression of mutant, but not wild-type, DISC-1 in PC12 cells reduces neurite extension. As schizophrenia is thought to reflect defects in cortical development that are determined by cytoskeletal protein activities, the cellular disturbances we observe with mutant DISC-1 may be relevant to psychopathologic mechanisms.

    Funded by: NIDA NIH HHS: DA-00074, K05 DA000074; NIMH NIH HHS: R01 MH018501, R37 MH018501; NINDS NIH HHS: NS-34172, R01 NS034172

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2003;100;1;289-94

  • Defective neurogenesis in citron kinase knockout mice by altered cytokinesis and massive apoptosis.

    Di Cunto F, Imarisio S, Hirsch E, Broccoli V, Bulfone A, Migheli A, Atzori C, Turco E, Triolo R, Dotto GP, Silengo L and Altruda F

    Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Torino, Italy. dicunto@molinette.unito.it

    Citron-kinase (Citron-K) has been proposed by in vitro studies as a crucial effector of Rho in regulation of cytokinesis. To further investigate in vivo its biologic functions, we have inactivated Citron-K gene in mice by homologous recombination. Citron-K-/- mice grow at slower rates, are severely ataxic, and die before adulthood as a consequence of fatal seizures. Their brains display defective neurogenesis, with depletion of specific neuronal populations. These abnormalities arise during development of the central nervous system due to altered cytokinesis and massive apoptosis. Our results indicate that Citron-K is essential for cytokinesis in vivo but only in specific neuronal precursors. Moreover, they suggest a novel molecular mechanism for a subset of human malformative syndromes of the CNS.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA16038, CA73796; NIAMS NIH HHS: AR39190; Telethon: 405/BI, F.2, TGM00P13, TGM06S01

    Neuron 2000;28;1;115-27

  • Proteomic analysis of NMDA receptor-adhesion protein signaling complexes.

    Husi H, Ward MA, Choudhary JS, Blackstock WP and Grant SG

    Centre for Genome Research, Centre for Neuroscience, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JQ, UK.

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) mediate long-lasting changes in synapse strength via downstream signaling pathways. We report proteomic characterization with mass spectrometry and immunoblotting of NMDAR multiprotein complexes (NRC) isolated from mouse brain. The NRC comprised 77 proteins organized into receptor, adaptor, signaling, cytoskeletal and novel proteins, of which 30 are implicated from binding studies and another 19 participate in NMDAR signaling. NMDAR and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes were linked to cadherins and L1 cell-adhesion molecules in complexes lacking AMPA receptors. These neurotransmitter-adhesion receptor complexes were bound to kinases, phosphatases, GTPase-activating proteins and Ras with effectors including MAPK pathway components. Several proteins were encoded by activity-dependent genes. Genetic or pharmacological interference with 15 NRC proteins impairs learning and with 22 proteins alters synaptic plasticity in rodents. Mutations in three human genes (NF1, Rsk-2, L1) are associated with learning impairments, indicating the NRC also participates in human cognition.

    Nature neuroscience 2000;3;7;661-9

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XIII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Suyama M, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    As a part of our cDNA project for deducing the coding sequence of unidentified human genes, we newly determined the sequences of 100 cDNA clones from a set of size-fractionated human brain cDNA libraries, and predicted the coding sequences of the corresponding genes, named KIAA0919 to KIAA1018. The sequencing of these clones revealed that the average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames were 4.9 kb and 2.6 kb (882 amino acid residues), respectively. A computer search of the sequences against the public databases indicated that predicted coding sequences of 87 genes contained sequences similar to known genes, 53% of which (46 genes) were categorized as proteins relating to cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility and nucleic acid management. The chromosomal locations of the genes were determined by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their mapping data were already available in the public databases. The expression profiles of all the genes among 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions (amygdala, corpus callosum, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, substania nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and thalamus), spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver were also examined by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;1;63-70

  • Citron binds to PSD-95 at glutamatergic synapses on inhibitory neurons in the hippocampus.

    Zhang W, Vazquez L, Apperson M and Kennedy MB

    Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.

    Synaptic NMDA-type glutamate receptors are anchored to the second of three PDZ (PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1) domains in the postsynaptic density (PSD) protein PSD-95. Here, we report that citron, a protein target for the activated form of the small GTP-binding protein Rho, preferentially binds the third PDZ domain of PSD-95. In GABAergic neurons from the hippocampus, citron forms a complex with PSD-95 and is concentrated at the postsynaptic side of glutamatergic synapses. Citron is expressed only at low levels in glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus and is not detectable at synapses onto these neurons. In contrast to citron, p135 SynGAP, an abundant synaptic Ras GTPase-activating protein that can bind to all three PDZ domains of PSD-95, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) are concentrated postsynaptically at glutamatergic synapses on glutamatergic neurons. CaM kinase II is not expressed and p135 SynGAP is expressed in less than half of hippocampal GABAergic neurons. Segregation of citron into inhibitory neurons does not occur in other brain regions. For example, citron is expressed at high levels in most thalamic neurons, which are primarily glutamatergic and contain CaM kinase II. In several other brain regions, citron is present in a subset of neurons that can be either GABAergic or glutamatergic and can sometimes express CaM kinase II. Thus, in the hippocampus, signal transduction complexes associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors are different in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and are specialized in a way that is specific to the hippocampus.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: NS28710

    The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience 1999;19;1;96-108

  • Citron rho-interacting kinase, a novel tissue-specific ser/thr kinase encompassing the Rho-Rac-binding protein Citron.

    Di Cunto F, Calautti E, Hsiao J, Ong L, Topley G, Turco E and Dotto GP

    Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA.

    We have identified a novel serine/threonine kinase belonging to the myotonic dystrophy kinase family. The kinase can be produced in at least two different isoforms: a approximately 240-kDa protein (Citron Rho-interacting kinase, CRIK), in which the kinase domain is followed by the sequence of Citron, a previously identified Rho/Rac binding protein; a approximately 54-kDa protein (CRIK-short kinase (SK)), which consists mostly of the kinase domain. CRIK and CRIK-SK proteins are capable of phosphorylating exogenous substrates as well as of autophosphorylation, when tested by in vitro kinase assays after expression into COS7 cells. CRIK kinase activity is increased severalfold by coexpression of costitutively active Rho, while active Rac has more limited effects. Kinase activity of endogenous CRIK is indicated by in vitro kinase assays after immunoprecipitation with antibodies recognizing the Citron moiety of the protein. When expressed in keratinocytes, full-length CRIK, but not CRIK-SK, localizes into corpuscular cytoplasmic structures and elicits recruitment of actin into these structures. The previously reported Rho-associated kinases ROCK I and II are ubiquitously expressed. In contrast, CRIK exhibits a restricted pattern of expression, suggesting that this kinase may fulfill a more specialized function in specific cell types.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA16038, CA73796; NIAMS NIH HHS: AR39190

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1998;273;45;29706-11

  • A novel partner for the GTP-bound forms of rho and rac.

    Madaule P, Furuyashiki T, Reid T, Ishizaki T, Watanabe G, Morii N and Narumiya S

    Second Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Japan.

    Using the yeast two hybrid system and overlay assays we identified a putative rholrac effector, citron, which interacts with the GTP-bound forms of rho and rac1, but not with cdc42. Extensive homologies to known proteins were not observed. This 183 kDa protein contains a C6H2 zinc finger, a PH domain, and a long coiled-coil forming region including 4 leucine zippers and the rholrac binding site. We recently identified three others putative rho effectors characterized by a common rho binding motif. Citron does not share this motif and displays a distinctive protein organization, thus defining a separate class of rho partners.

    FEBS letters 1995;377;2;243-8

Gene lists (9)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000013 G2C Homo sapiens Human mGluR5 Human orthologues of mouse mGluR5 complex adapted from Collins et al (2006) 52
L00000015 G2C Homo sapiens Human NRC Human orthologues of mouse NRC adapted from Collins et al (2006) 186
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000034 G2C Homo sapiens Pocklington H3 Human orthologues of cluster 3 (mouse) from Pocklington et al (2006) 30
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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