G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00000045
Gene symbol
SIPA1L1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
signal-induced proliferation-associated 1 like 1
Orthologue
G00000020 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000028989 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000197555 (Ensembl human gene)
26037 (Entrez Gene)
1303 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
SIPA1L1 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:20284 (HGNC)
Protein Expression
2875 (human protein atlas)
Protein Sequence
O43166 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • E6TP1
  • KIAA0440

Literature (14)

Pubmed - other

  • Defining the human deubiquitinating enzyme interaction landscape.

    Sowa ME, Bennett EJ, Gygi SP and Harper JW

    Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (Dubs) function to remove covalently attached ubiquitin from proteins, thereby controlling substrate activity and/or abundance. For most Dubs, their functions, targets, and regulation are poorly understood. To systematically investigate Dub function, we initiated a global proteomic analysis of Dubs and their associated protein complexes. This was accomplished through the development of a software platform called CompPASS, which uses unbiased metrics to assign confidence measurements to interactions from parallel nonreciprocal proteomic data sets. We identified 774 candidate interacting proteins associated with 75 Dubs. Using Gene Ontology, interactome topology classification, subcellular localization, and functional studies, we link Dubs to diverse processes, including protein turnover, transcription, RNA processing, DNA damage, and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. This work provides the first glimpse into the Dub interaction landscape, places previously unstudied Dubs within putative biological pathways, and identifies previously unknown interactions and protein complexes involved in this increasingly important arm of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Funded by: NIA NIH HHS: AG085011, R01 AG011085, R01 AG011085-16; NIDDK NIH HHS: K01 DK098285; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM054137, GM67945, R01 GM054137, R01 GM054137-14, R01 GM067945

    Cell 2009;138;2;389-403

  • Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome.

    Barbe L, Lundberg E, Oksvold P, Stenius A, Lewin E, Björling E, Asplund A, Pontén F, Brismar H, Uhlén M and Andersson-Svahn H

    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2008;7;3;499-508

  • Analysis of the roles of E6 binding to E6TP1 and nuclear localization in the human papillomavirus type 31 life cycle.

    Lee C, Wooldridge TR and Laimins LA

    Department of Microbiology-Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 303 E. Chicago Street, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

    The E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomaviruses provide important functions not only for malignant transformation but also in the productive viral life cycle. E6 proteins have been shown to bind to a number of cellular factors, but only a limited number of analyses have investigated the effects of these interactions on the viral life cycle. In this study, we investigated the consequences of HPV 31 E6 binding to E6TP1, a putative Rap1 GAP protein. HPV 16 E6 has been shown to bind as well as induce the rapid turnover of E6TP1, and similar effects were observed with HPV 31 E6. Mutation of amino acid 128 in HPV 31 E6 was found to abrogate the ability to bind and degrade E6TP1 but did not alter binding to another alpha-helical domain protein, E6AP. When HPV 31 genomes containing mutations at amino acid 128 were transfected into human keratinocytes, the viral DNAs were not stably maintained as episomes indicating the importance of this residue for pathogenesis. Many E6 binding partners including E6TP1 are cytoplasmic proteins, but E6 has been also reported to be localized to the nucleus. We therefore investigated the importance of E6 localization to the nucleus in the viral life cycle. Using a fusion of E6 to Green Fluorescent Protein, we mapped one component of the nuclear localization sequences to residues 121 to 124 of HPV 31 E6. Mutation of these residues in the context of the HPV 31 genome abrogated the ability for episomes to be stably maintained and impaired the ability to extend the life span of cells. These studies identify two activities of HPV 31 E6 that are important for its function in the viral life cycle and for extension of cell life span.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA74202, R01 CA074202, R01 CA074202-10

    Virology 2007;358;1;201-10

  • Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.

    Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, Macek B, Kumar C, Mortensen P and Mann M

    Center for Experimental BioInformatics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark.

    Cell signaling mechanisms often transmit information via posttranslational protein modifications, most importantly reversible protein phosphorylation. Here we develop and apply a general mass spectrometric technology for identification and quantitation of phosphorylation sites as a function of stimulus, time, and subcellular location. We have detected 6,600 phosphorylation sites on 2,244 proteins and have determined their temporal dynamics after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and recorded them in the Phosida database. Fourteen percent of phosphorylation sites are modulated at least 2-fold by EGF, and these were classified by their temporal profiles. Surprisingly, a majority of proteins contain multiple phosphorylation sites showing different kinetics, suggesting that they serve as platforms for integrating signals. In addition to protein kinase cascades, the targets of reversible phosphorylation include ubiquitin ligases, guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and at least 46 different transcriptional regulators. The dynamic phosphoproteome provides a missing link in a global, integrative view of cellular regulation.

    Cell 2006;127;3;635-48

  • Targeted proteomic analysis of 14-3-3 sigma, a p53 effector commonly silenced in cancer.

    Benzinger A, Muster N, Koch HB, Yates JR and Hermeking H

    Molecular Oncology, Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried/Munich, Germany.

    To comprehensively identify proteins interacting with 14-3-3 sigma in vivo, tandem affinity purification and the multidimensional protein identification technology were combined to characterize 117 proteins associated with 14-3-3 sigma in human cells. The majority of identified proteins contained one or several phosphorylatable 14-3-3-binding sites indicating a potential direct interaction with 14-3-3 sigma. 25 proteins were not previously assigned to any function and were named SIP2-26 (for 14-3-3 sigma-interacting protein). Among the 92 interactors with known function were a number of proteins previously implicated in oncogenic signaling (APC, A-RAF, B-RAF, and c-RAF) and cell cycle regulation (AJUBA, c-TAK, PTOV-1, and WEE1). The largest functional classes comprised proteins involved in the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, polarity, adhesion, mitogenic signaling, and motility. Accordingly ectopic 14-3-3 sigma expression prevented cellular migration in a wounding assay and enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The functional diversity of the identified proteins indicates that induction of 14-3-3 sigma could allow p53 to affect numerous processes in addition to the previously characterized inhibitory effect on G2/M progression. The data suggest that the cancer-specific loss of 14-3-3 sigma expression by epigenetic silencing or p53 mutations contributes to cancer formation by multiple routes.

    Funded by: NCRR NIH HHS: RR11823-08

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2005;4;6;785-95

  • Protein partners of C/EBPepsilon.

    Chih DY, Park DJ, Gross M, Idos G, Vuong PT, Hirama T, Chumakov AM, Said J and Koeffler HP

    Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, Calif. 90048, USA.

    CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-epsilon (C/EBPepsilon) is a nuclear transcription factor implicated in the regulation of terminal myeloid differentiation. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, potential interaction partners of C/EBPepsilon involved in myeloid development were identified. C/EBPepsilon was found to associate with other C/EBP family members, including C/EBPepsilon and CHOP as well as other proteins that are known to contain a leucine-zipper protein interaction motif including CREB2, LDOC1, E6TP1, and AF-17. In addition, C/EBPepsilon demonstrated the potential for interaction with proteins that do not possess a leucine-zipper motif, including proteins that may be involved in sumoylation (protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 [PIAS1] and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I). As expected, the association of C/EBPepsilon with other C/EBP family members depends on the presence of a functional leucine-zipper motif. Mapping studies of C/EBPepsilon with PIAS1 (as an example of a nonleucine-zipper-containing protein) showed that C/EBPepsilon interacts with the amino-terminal domain of PIAS1. The function of C/EBPepsilon interacting proteins was further investigated. Co-expression of C/EBPepsilon with C/EBPdelta resulted in potent transactivation in a lactoferrin reporter system. A gel mobility shift assay suggests that C/EBPepsilon, C/EBPalpha, and C/EBPdelta proteins can bind as heterodimers to a C/EBP consensus DNA-binding site. As CHOP is known to represent a transcriptional repressor, the functional interaction between C/EBPepsilon and CHOP was investigated. Co-expression of C/EBPepsilon and c-Myb with CHOP caused marked transcriptional repression of target reporter genes. Our results suggest heterodimeric partners of C/EBPepsilon modulate the function of C/EBPepsilon in mediating gene transcription during myelopoiesis.

    Experimental hematology 2004;32;12;1173-81

  • Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.

    Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, Elias JE, Villén J, Li J, Cohn MA, Cantley LC and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Determining the site of a regulatory phosphorylation event is often essential for elucidating specific kinase-substrate relationships, providing a handle for understanding essential signaling pathways and ultimately allowing insights into numerous disease pathologies. Despite intense research efforts to elucidate mechanisms of protein phosphorylation regulation, efficient, large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites remains an unsolved problem. In this report we describe an application of existing technology for the isolation and identification of phosphorylation sites. By using a strategy based on strong cation exchange chromatography, phosphopeptides were enriched from the nuclear fraction of HeLa cell lysate. From 967 proteins, 2,002 phosphorylation sites were determined by tandem MS. This unprecedented large collection of sites permitted a detailed accounting of known and unknown kinase motifs and substrates.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041, K22 HG000041, T32 HG000041; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945, GMS6203, R01 GM056203, R01 GM067945

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;33;12130-5

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    Heilig R, Eckenberg R, Petit JL, Fonknechten N, Da Silva C, Cattolico L, Levy M, Barbe V, de Berardinis V, Ureta-Vidal A, Pelletier E, Vico V, Anthouard V, Rowen L, Madan A, Qin S, Sun H, Du H, Pepin K, Artiguenave F, Robert C, Cruaud C, Brüls T, Jaillon O, Friedlander L, Samson G, Brottier P, Cure S, Ségurens B, Anière F, Samain S, Crespeau H, Abbasi N, Aiach N, Boscus D, Dickhoff R, Dors M, Dubois I, Friedman C, Gouyvenoux M, James R, Madan A, Mairey-Estrada B, Mangenot S, Martins N, Ménard M, Oztas S, Ratcliffe A, Shaffer T, Trask B, Vacherie B, Bellemere C, Belser C, Besnard-Gonnet M, Bartol-Mavel D, Boutard M, Briez-Silla S, Combette S, Dufossé-Laurent V, Ferron C, Lechaplais C, Louesse C, Muselet D, Magdelenat G, Pateau E, Petit E, Sirvain-Trukniewicz P, Trybou A, Vega-Czarny N, Bataille E, Bluet E, Bordelais I, Dubois M, Dumont C, Guérin T, Haffray S, Hammadi R, Muanga J, Pellouin V, Robert D, Wunderle E, Gauguet G, Roy A, Sainte-Marthe L, Verdier J, Verdier-Discala C, Hillier L, Fulton L, McPherson J, Matsuda F, Wilson R, Scarpelli C, Gyapay G, Wincker P, Saurin W, Quétier F, Waterston R, Hood L and Weissenbach J

    Genoscope-Centre National de Séquençage, 91000, Evry, France. heilig@genoscope.cns.fr

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end.

    Nature 2003;421;6923;601-7

  • Protein-protein interactions between large proteins: two-hybrid screening using a functionally classified library composed of long cDNAs.

    Nakayama M, Kikuno R and Ohara O

    Department of Human Gene Research, Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818, Japan. nmanabu@kazusa.or.jp

    Large proteins have multiple domains that are potentially capable of binding many kinds of partners. It is conceivable, therefore, that such proteins could function as an intricate framework of assembly protein complexes. To comprehensively study protein-protein interactions between large KIAA proteins, we have constructed a library composed of 1087 KIAA cDNA clones based on prior functional classifications done in silico. We were guided by two principles that raise the success rate for detecting interactions per tested combination: we avoided testing low-probability combinations, and reduced the number of potential false negatives that arise from the fact that large proteins cannot reliably be expressed in yeast. The latter was addressed by constructing a cDNA library comprised of random fragments encoding large proteins. Cytoplasmic domains of KIAA transmembrane proteins (>1000 amino acids) were used as bait for yeast two-hybrid screening. Our analyses reveal that several KIAA proteins bearing a transmembrane region have the capability of binding to other KIAA proteins containing domains (e.g., PDZ, SH3, rhoGEF, and spectrin) known to be localized to highly specialized submembranous sites, indicating that they participate in cellular junction formation, receptor or channel clustering, and intracellular signaling events. Our representative library should be a very useful resource for detecting previously unidentified interactions because it complements conventional expression libraries, which seldom contain large cDNAs.

    Genome research 2002;12;11;1773-84

  • Construction of expression-ready cDNA clones for KIAA genes: manual curation of 330 KIAA cDNA clones.

    Nakajima D, Okazaki N, Yamakawa H, Kikuno R, Ohara O and Nagase T

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan.

    We have accumulated information on protein-coding sequences of uncharacterized human genes, which are known as KIAA genes, through cDNA sequencing. For comprehensive functional analysis of the KIAA genes, it is necessary to prepare a set of cDNA clones which direct the synthesis of functional KIAA gene products. However, since the KIAA cDNAs were derived from long mRNAs (> 4 kb), it was not expected that all of them were full-length. Thus, as the first step toward preparing these clones, we evaluated the integrity of protein-coding sequences of KIAA cDNA clones through comparison with homologous protein entries in the public database. As a result, 1141 KIAA cDNAs had at least one homologous entry in the database, and 619 of them (54%) were found to be truncated at the 5' and/or 3' ends. In this study, 290 KIAA cDNA clones were tailored to be full-length or have considerably longer sequences than the original clones by isolating additional cDNA clones and/or connected parts of additional cDNAs or PCR products of the missing portion to the original cDNA clone. Consequently, 265, 8, and 17 predicted CDSs of KIAA cDNA clones were increased in the amino-, carboxy-, and both terminal sequences, respectively. In addition, 40 cDNA clones were modified to remove spurious interruption of protein-coding sequences. The total length of the resultant extensions at amino- and carboxy-terminals of KIAA gene products reached 97,000 and 7,216 amino acid residues, respectively, and various protein domains were found in these extended portions.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 2002;9;3;99-106

  • Regulation of dendritic spine morphology by SPAR, a PSD-95-associated RapGAP.

    Pak DT, Yang S, Rudolph-Correia S, Kim E and Sheng M

    Department of Neurobiology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

    The PSD-95/SAP90 family of scaffold proteins organizes the postsynaptic density (PSD) and regulates NMDA receptor signaling at excitatory synapses. We report that SPAR, a Rap-specific GTPase-activating protein (RapGAP), interacts with the guanylate kinase-like domain of PSD-95 and forms a complex with PSD-95 and NMDA receptors in brain. In heterologous cells, SPAR reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton and recruits PSD-95 to F-actin. In hippocampal neurons, SPAR localizes to dendritic spines and causes enlargement of spine heads, many of which adopt an irregular appearance with putative multiple synapses. Dominant negative SPAR constructs cause narrowing and elongation of spines. The effects of SPAR on spine morphology depend on the RapGAP and actin-interacting domains, implicating Rap signaling in the regulation of postsynaptic structure.

    Funded by: NINDS NIH HHS: NS10886, NS35050

    Neuron 2001;31;2;289-303

  • The E6 oncoproteins of high-risk papillomaviruses bind to a novel putative GAP protein, E6TP1, and target it for degradation.

    Gao Q, Srinivasan S, Boyer SN, Wazer DE and Band V

    Department of Radiation Oncology, New England Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with carcinomas of the cervix and other genital tumors. Previous studies have identified two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, which are expressed in the majority of HPV-associated carcinomas. The ability of high-risk HPV E6 protein to immortalize human mammary epithelial cells (MECs) has provided a single-gene model to study the mechanisms of E6-induced oncogenic transformation. In this system, the E6 protein targets the p53 tumor suppressor protein for degradation, and mutational analyses have shown that E6-induced degradation of p53 protein is required for MEC immortalization. However, the inability of most dominant-negative p53 mutants to induce efficient immortalization of MECs suggests the existence of additional targets of the HPV E6 oncoprotein. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have isolated a novel E6-binding protein. This polypeptide, designated E6TP1 (E6-targeted protein 1), exhibits high homology to GTPase-activating proteins for Rap, including SPA-1, tuberin, and Rap1GAP. The mRNA for E6TP1 is widely expressed in tissues and in vitro-cultured cell lines. The gene for E6TP1 localizes to chromosome 14q23.2-14q24.3 within a locus that has been shown to undergo loss of heterozygosity in malignant meningiomas. Importantly, E6TP1 is targeted for degradation by the high-risk but not the low-risk HPV E6 proteins both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the immortalization-competent but not the immortalization-incompetent HPV16 E6 mutants target the E6TP1 protein for degradation. Our results identify a novel target for the E6 oncoprotein and provide a potential link between HPV E6 oncogenesis and alteration of a small G protein signaling pathway.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA56803, CA64823

    Molecular and cellular biology 1999;19;1;733-44

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. VIII. 78 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Ishikawa K, Nagase T, Nakajima D, Seki N, Ohira M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Chiba, Japan.

    As a part of our project for accumulating sequence information of the coding regions of unidentified human genes, we herein report the sequence features of 78 new cDNA clones isolated from human brain cDNA libraries as those which may code for large proteins. The sequence data showed that the average size of the cDNA inserts and their open reading frames was 6.0 kb and 2.8 kb (925 amino acid residues), respectively, and these clones produced the corresponding sizes of protein products in an in vitro transcription/translation system. Homology search against the public databases indicated that the predicted coding sequences of 68 genes contained sequences similar to known genes, 69% of which (47 genes) were related to cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, and cell structure/motility. The expression profiles of these genes in 14 different tissues have been analyzed by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method, and 8 genes were found to be predominantly expressed in the brain.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1997;4;5;307-13

Gene lists (5)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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