G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00000835
Gene symbol
Letm1 (MGI)
Species
Mus musculus
Description
leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1
Orthologue
G00002084 (Homo sapiens)

Databases (9)

Curated Gene
OTTMUSG00000021523 (Vega mouse gene)
Gene
ENSMUSG00000005299 (Ensembl mouse gene)
56384 (Entrez Gene)
1286 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
Gene Expression
NM_019694 (Allen Brain Atlas)
56384 (Genepaint)
Literature
604407 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
MGI:1932557 (MGI)
Protein Sequence
Q9Z2I0 (UniProt)

Literature (11)

Pubmed - other

  • A high-resolution anatomical atlas of the transcriptome in the mouse embryo.

    Diez-Roux G, Banfi S, Sultan M, Geffers L, Anand S, Rozado D, Magen A, Canidio E, Pagani M, Peluso I, Lin-Marq N, Koch M, Bilio M, Cantiello I, Verde R, De Masi C, Bianchi SA, Cicchini J, Perroud E, Mehmeti S, Dagand E, Schrinner S, Nürnberger A, Schmidt K, Metz K, Zwingmann C, Brieske N, Springer C, Hernandez AM, Herzog S, Grabbe F, Sieverding C, Fischer B, Schrader K, Brockmeyer M, Dettmer S, Helbig C, Alunni V, Battaini MA, Mura C, Henrichsen CN, Garcia-Lopez R, Echevarria D, Puelles E, Garcia-Calero E, Kruse S, Uhr M, Kauck C, Feng G, Milyaev N, Ong CK, Kumar L, Lam M, Semple CA, Gyenesei A, Mundlos S, Radelof U, Lehrach H, Sarmientos P, Reymond A, Davidson DR, Dollé P, Antonarakis SE, Yaspo ML, Martinez S, Baldock RA, Eichele G and Ballabio A

    Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine, Naples, Italy.

    Ascertaining when and where genes are expressed is of crucial importance to understanding or predicting the physiological role of genes and proteins and how they interact to form the complex networks that underlie organ development and function. It is, therefore, crucial to determine on a genome-wide level, the spatio-temporal gene expression profiles at cellular resolution. This information is provided by colorimetric RNA in situ hybridization that can elucidate expression of genes in their native context and does so at cellular resolution. We generated what is to our knowledge the first genome-wide transcriptome atlas by RNA in situ hybridization of an entire mammalian organism, the developing mouse at embryonic day 14.5. This digital transcriptome atlas, the Eurexpress atlas (http://www.eurexpress.org), consists of a searchable database of annotated images that can be interactively viewed. We generated anatomy-based expression profiles for over 18,000 coding genes and over 400 microRNAs. We identified 1,002 tissue-specific genes that are a source of novel tissue-specific markers for 37 different anatomical structures. The quality and the resolution of the data revealed novel molecular domains for several developing structures, such as the telencephalon, a novel organization for the hypothalamus, and insight on the Wnt network involved in renal epithelial differentiation during kidney development. The digital transcriptome atlas is a powerful resource to determine co-expression of genes, to identify cell populations and lineages, and to identify functional associations between genes relevant to development and disease.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: MC_U127527203; Telethon: TGM11S03

    PLoS biology 2011;9;1;e1000582

  • Analysis of early nephron patterning reveals a role for distal RV proliferation in fusion to the ureteric tip via a cap mesenchyme-derived connecting segment.

    Georgas K, Rumballe B, Valerius MT, Chiu HS, Thiagarajan RD, Lesieur E, Aronow BJ, Brunskill EW, Combes AN, Tang D, Taylor D, Grimmond SM, Potter SS, McMahon AP and Little MH

    NHMRC Principal Research Fellow, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.

    While nephron formation is known to be initiated by a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition of the cap mesenchyme to form a renal vesicle (RV), the subsequent patterning of the nephron and fusion with the ureteric component of the kidney to form a patent contiguous uriniferous tubule has not been fully characterized. Using dual section in situ hybridization (SISH)/immunohistochemistry (IHC) we have revealed distinct distal/proximal patterning of Notch, BMP and Wnt pathway components within the RV stage nephron. Quantitation of mitoses and Cyclin D1 expression indicated that cell proliferation was higher in the distal RV, reflecting the differential developmental programs of the proximal and distal populations. A small number of RV genes were also expressed in the early connecting segment of the nephron. Dual ISH/IHC combined with serial section immunofluorescence and 3D reconstruction revealed that fusion occurs between the late RV and adjacent ureteric tip via a process that involves loss of the intervening ureteric epithelial basement membrane and insertion of cells expressing RV markers into the ureteric tip. Using Six2-eGFPCre x R26R-lacZ mice, we demonstrate that these cells are derived from the cap mesenchyme and not the ureteric epithelium. Hence, both nephron patterning and patency are evident at the late renal vesicle stage.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK070136, DK070251, F32DK060319, R37 DK054364, U01 DK070136

    Developmental biology 2009;332;2;273-86

  • A mitochondrial protein compendium elucidates complex I disease biology.

    Pagliarini DJ, Calvo SE, Chang B, Sheth SA, Vafai SB, Ong SE, Walford GA, Sugiana C, Boneh A, Chen WK, Hill DE, Vidal M, Evans JG, Thorburn DR, Carr SA and Mootha VK

    Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

    Mitochondria are complex organelles whose dysfunction underlies a broad spectrum of human diseases. Identifying all of the proteins resident in this organelle and understanding how they integrate into pathways represent major challenges in cell biology. Toward this goal, we performed mass spectrometry, GFP tagging, and machine learning to create a mitochondrial compendium of 1098 genes and their protein expression across 14 mouse tissues. We link poorly characterized proteins in this inventory to known mitochondrial pathways by virtue of shared evolutionary history. Using this approach, we predict 19 proteins to be important for the function of complex I (CI) of the electron transport chain. We validate a subset of these predictions using RNAi, including C8orf38, which we further show harbors an inherited mutation in a lethal, infantile CI deficiency. Our results have important implications for understanding CI function and pathogenesis and, more generally, illustrate how our compendium can serve as a foundation for systematic investigations of mitochondria.

    Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute; NIDDK NIH HHS: DK43351, DK57521, P30 DK043351, P30 DK057521; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM077465, R01 GM077465, R01 GM077465-04

    Cell 2008;134;1;112-23

  • Libraries enriched for alternatively spliced exons reveal splicing patterns in melanocytes and melanomas.

    Watahiki A, Waki K, Hayatsu N, Shiraki T, Kondo S, Nakamura M, Sasaki D, Arakawa T, Kawai J, Harbers M, Hayashizaki Y and Carninci P

    Genome Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako main campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 Japan.

    It is becoming increasingly clear that alternative splicing enables the complex development and homeostasis of higher organisms. To gain a better understanding of how splicing contributes to regulatory pathways, we have developed an alternative splicing library approach for the identification of alternatively spliced exons and their flanking regions by alternative splicing sequence enriched tags sequencing. Here, we have applied our approach to mouse melan-c melanocyte and B16-F10Y melanoma cell lines, in which 5,401 genes were found to be alternatively spliced. These genes include those encoding important regulatory factors such as cyclin D2, Ilk, MAPK12, MAPK14, RAB4, melastatin 1 and previously unidentified splicing events for 436 genes. Real-time PCR further identified cell line-specific exons for Tmc6, Abi1, Sorbs1, Ndel1 and Snx16. Thus, the ASL approach proved effective in identifying splicing events, which suggest that alternative splicing is important in melanoma development.

    Nature methods 2004;1;3;233-9

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Integrated analysis of protein composition, tissue diversity, and gene regulation in mouse mitochondria.

    Mootha VK, Bunkenborg J, Olsen JV, Hjerrild M, Wisniewski JR, Stahl E, Bolouri MS, Ray HN, Sihag S, Kamal M, Patterson N, Lander ES and Mann M

    MDS Proteomics, Odense 5230, Denmark.

    Mitochondria are tailored to meet the metabolic and signaling needs of each cell. To explore its molecular composition, we performed a proteomic survey of mitochondria from mouse brain, heart, kidney, and liver and combined the results with existing gene annotations to produce a list of 591 mitochondrial proteins, including 163 proteins not previously associated with this organelle. The protein expression data were largely concordant with large-scale surveys of RNA abundance and both measures indicate tissue-specific differences in organelle composition. RNA expression profiles across tissues revealed networks of mitochondrial genes that share functional and regulatory mechanisms. We also determined a larger "neighborhood" of genes whose expression is closely correlated to the mitochondrial genes. The combined analysis identifies specific genes of biological interest, such as candidates for mtDNA repair enzymes, offers new insights into the biogenesis and ancestry of mammalian mitochondria, and provides a framework for understanding the organelle's contribution to human disease.

    Cell 2003;115;5;629-40

  • Proteomic analysis of the mouse liver mitochondrial inner membrane.

    Da Cruz S, Xenarios I, Langridge J, Vilbois F, Parone PA and Martinou JC

    University of Geneva, Department of Cellular Biology, 30 quai E Ansermet, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland.

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in cellular homeostasis, which justifies the increasing interest in mapping the different components of these organelles. Here we have focused our study on the identification of proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM). This membrane is of particular interest because, besides the well known components of the respiratory chain complexes, it contains several ion channels and many carrier proteins that certainly play a key role in mitochondrial function and, therefore, deserve to be identified at the molecular level. To achieve this goal we have used a novel approach combining the use of highly purified mouse liver mitochondrial inner membranes, extraction of membrane proteins with organic acid, and two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This procedure allowed us to identify 182 proteins that are involved in several biochemical processes, such as the electron transport machinery, the protein import machinery, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and ion or substrate transport. The full range of isoelectric point (3.9-12.5), molecular mass (6-527 kDa), and hydrophobicity values (up to 16 transmembrane predicted domains) were represented. In addition, of the 182 proteins found, 20 were unknown or had never previously been associated with the MIM. Overexpression of some of these proteins in mammalian cells confirmed their mitochondrial localization and resulted in severe remodeling of the mitochondrial network. This study provides the first proteome of the MIM and provides a basis for a more detailed study of the newly characterized proteins of this membrane.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;42;41566-71

  • Construction of long-transcript enriched cDNA libraries from submicrogram amounts of total RNAs by a universal PCR amplification method.

    Piao Y, Ko NT, Lim MK and Ko MS

    Developmental Genomics and Aging Section, Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA.

    Here we report a novel design of linker primer that allows one to differentially amplify long tracts (average 3.0 kb with size ranges of 1-7 kb) or short DNAs (average 1.5 kb with size ranges of 0.5-3 kb) from a complex mixture. The method allows one to generate cDNA libraries enriched for long transcripts without size selection of insert DNAs. One representative library from newborn kidney includes 70% of clones bearing ATG start codons. A comparable library has been generated from 20 mouse blastocysts, containing only approximately 40 ng of total RNA. This universal PCR amplification scheme can provide a route to isolate very large cDNAs, even if they are expressed at very low levels.

    Genome research 2001;11;9;1553-8

  • Mouse models for the Wolf-Hirschhorn deletion syndrome.

    Näf D, Wilson LA, Bergstrom RA, Smith RS, Goodwin NC, Verkerk A, van Ommen GJ, Ackerman SL, Frankel WN and Schimenti JC

    The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA.

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a deletion syndrome caused by segmental haploidy of chromosome 4p16.3. Its hallmark features include a 'Greek warrior helmet' facial appearance, mental retardation, various midline defects and seizures. The WHS critical region (WHSCR) lies between the Huntington's disease gene, HD, and FGFR3. In mice, the homologs of these genes map to chromosome 5 in a region of conserved synteny with human 4p16.3. To derive mouse models of WHS and map genes responsible for subphenotypes of the syndrome, five mouse lines bearing radiation-induced deletions spanning the WHSCR syntenic region were generated and characterized. Similar to WHS patients, these animals were growth-retarded, were susceptible to seizures and showed midline (palate closure, tail kinks), craniofacial and ocular anomalies (colobomas, corneal opacities). Other phenotypes included cerebellar hypoplasia and a shortened cerebral cortex. Expression of WHS-like traits was variable and influenced by strain background and deletion size. These mice represent the first animal models for WHS. This collection of nested chromosomal deletions will be useful for mapping and identifying loci responsible for the various subphenotypes of WHS, and provides a paradigm for the dissection of other deletion syndromes using the mouse.

    Funded by: NICHD NIH HHS: HD35984; NINDS NIH HHS: NS31348, NS40246

    Human molecular genetics 2001;10;2;91-8

  • Large-scale screen for genes involved in gonad development.

    Wertz K and Herrmann BG

    Max-Planck-Institut für Immunbiologie, Abt. Entwicklungsbiologie, Stübeweg 51, 79108, Freiburg, Germany.

    The vertebrate gonad develops from the intermediate mesoderm as an initially bipotential organ anlage, the genital ridge. In mammals, Sry acts as a genetic switch towards testis development. Sox9 has been shown to act downstream of Sry in testis development, while Dax1 appears to counteract Sry. Few more genes have been implicated in early gonad development. However, the genetic networks controlling early differentiation events in testis and ovary are still far from being understood. In order to provide a broader basis for the molecular analysis of gonad development, high-throughput gene expression analysis was utilized to identify genes specifically expressed in the gonad. In total, among 138 genes isolated which showed tissue specific expression in the embryo, 79 were detected in the developing gonad or sex ducts. Twenty-seven have not been functionally described before, while 40 represent known genes and 12 are putative mouse orthologues. Forty-five of the latter two groups (86%) have not been described previously in the fetal gonad. In addition, 21 of the gonad specific genes showed sex-dimorphic expression suggesting a role in sex determination and/or gonad differentiation. Eighteen of the latter (86%) have not been described previously in the fetal gonad. In total we provide new data on 72 genes which may play a role in gonad or sex duct development and/or sex determination. Thus we have generated a large gene resource for the investigation of these processes, and demonstrate the suitability of high-throughput gene expression screening for the genetic analysis of organogenesis.

    Mechanisms of development 2000;98;1-2;51-70

  • LETM1, a novel gene encoding a putative EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein, flanks the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) critical region and is deleted in most WHS patients.

    Endele S, Fuhry M, Pak SJ, Zabel BU and Winterpacht A

    Children's Hospital, University of Mainz, Mainz, D-55101, Germany.

    Deletions within human chromosome 4p16.3 cause Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), which is characterized by severe mental and developmental defects. It is thought that haploinsufficiency of more than one gene contributes to the complex phenotype. We have cloned and characterized a novel gene (LETM1) that is deleted in nearly all WHS patients. LETM1 encodes a putative member of the EF-hand family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. The protein contains two EF-hands, a transmembrane domain, a leucine zipper, and several coiled-coil domains. On the basis of its possible Ca(2+)-binding property and involvement in Ca(2+) signaling and/or homeostasis, we propose that haploinsufficiency of LETM1 may contribute to the neuromuscular features of WHS patients.

    Genomics 1999;60;2;218-25

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000001 G2C Mus musculus Mouse PSD Mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000002 G2C Mus musculus Mouse mitochondria Mouse mitochondria adapted from Collins et al (2006) 91
L00000008 G2C Mus musculus Mouse PSP Mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000062 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus 984
L00000070 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list (ortho) 1461
L00000072 G2C Mus musculus BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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