G2Cdb::Human Disease report

Disease id
D00000074
Name
Medulloblastoma
Nervous system disease
no

Genes (3)

Gene Name/Description Mutations Found Literature Mutations Type Genetic association?
G00001624 PIK3CA
phosphoinositide-3-kinase, catalytic, alpha polypeptide
Y (15289301) Unknown (?) Y
G00001870 CSE1L
CSE1 chromosome segregation 1-like (yeast)
? (14758948) Copy Number Polymorphism (CNP) Y
G00002235 CTNNB1
catenin (cadherin-associated protein), beta 1, 88kDa
Y (12209999) Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ?

References

  • Mutations of PIK3CA in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, high-grade astrocytomas, and medulloblastomas.

    Broderick DK, Di C, Parrett TJ, Samuels YR, Cummins JM, McLendon RE, Fults DW, Velculescu VE, Bigner DD and Yan H

    Brain Tumor Center, Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

    The phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase pathway is activated in multiple advanced cancers, including glioblastomas, through inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Recently, mutations in PIK3CA, a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase catalytic subunits, were identified in a significant fraction (25-30%) of colorectal cancers, gastric cancers, and glioblastomas and in a smaller fraction of breast and lung cancers. These mutations were found to cluster into two major "hot spots" located in the helical and catalytic domains. To determine whether PIK3CA is genetically altered in brain tumors, we performed a large-scale mutational analysis of the helical and catalytic domains. A total of 13 mutations of PIK3CA within these specific domains were identified in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, and medulloblastomas, whereas no mutations were identified in ependymomas or low-grade astrocytomas. These observations implicate PIK3CA as an oncogene in a wider spectrum of adult and pediatric brain tumors and suggest that PIK3CA may be a useful diagnostic marker or a therapeutic target in these cancers.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 2P30 CA 14236, 5P20 CA 096890-02, R37 CA 11898-34; NINDS NIH HHS: NS 20023-21

    Cancer research 2004;64;15;5048-50

  • Detection of oncogene amplifications in medulloblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization and array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Tong CY, Hui AB, Yin XL, Pang JC, Zhu XL, Poon WS and Ng HK

    Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, China.

    Object: Few studies have been conducted to investigate the genomic survey of oncogene amplification in medulloblastoma. Low frequency of N-myc, C-myc, and epidermal grow factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification (< 10%) has been reported in medulloblastoma. Previous comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) study of primary medulloblastomas has revealed chromosomal amplification on 2p21, 3p, 5p15.3, 7q, 8q24, 11q22.3, and 17q. The aim of this study was to detect common oncogenes involved in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Methods: The authors studied a series of 14 samples by performing CGH and array-based CGH. The CGH analysis detected nonrandom losses on 8p, 17p, 16q, 8q, and 1p, whereas gains were found on 17q, 12q, 7q, and 1p. Array-based CGH was conducted to investigate amplification of 58 oncogenes throughout the genome of these samples. Gene amplifications identified for the first time included PGY1 at 7q21.1, MDM2 at 12q14.3-q15, and ERBB2 at 17q21.2. The highest frequencies of oncogene gain were detected in D17S1670 (61.5%), PIK3CA (46.2%), PGY1 (38.5%), MET (38.5%), ERBB2 (38.5%), and CSE1L (38.5%). The gain in gene copy numbers was confirmed in 34 additional archival medulloblastoma cases by using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

    Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide survey of multiple oncogene amplifications involved in the development of medulloblastoma. Gains of several candidate oncogenes such as D17S1670, ERBB2, PIK3CA, PGY1, MET, and CSE1L were frequently detected. These genes may be used as molecular markers and therapeutic targets of medulloblastomas.

    Journal of neurosurgery 2004;100;2 Suppl Pediatrics;187-93

  • Role of Wnt pathway in medulloblastoma oncogenesis.

    Yokota N, Nishizawa S, Ohta S, Date H, Sugimura H, Namba H and Maekawa M

    Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan.

    To clarify the roles of Wnt pathway in medulloblastoma oncogenesis, immunohistochemical staining of beta-catenin and Wnt-1 and genomic analyses of CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) and AXIN1 (axin 1) were examined in 23 sporadic cases. Accumulation of beta-catenin in tumor cells was immunohistochemically proven in 5 cases; 2 cases showed positive immunoreactivity for Wnt-1 and another 2 showed mutation of either CTNNB1 or AXIN1. AXIN1 mutation was in exon 3, corresponding to GSK-3beta binding site and CTNNB1 mutation was in exon 3, corresponding to its phosphorylation site. Disruption of these proteins could result in upregulation of the Wnt signaling and accumulation of beta-catenin, followed by cell proliferation and medulloblastoma oncogenesis.

    International journal of cancer 2002;101;2;198-201

Literature (3)

Pubmed - human_disease

  • Detection of oncogene amplifications in medulloblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization and array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    Tong CY, Hui AB, Yin XL, Pang JC, Zhu XL, Poon WS and Ng HK

    Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, China.

    Object: Few studies have been conducted to investigate the genomic survey of oncogene amplification in medulloblastoma. Low frequency of N-myc, C-myc, and epidermal grow factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification (< 10%) has been reported in medulloblastoma. Previous comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) study of primary medulloblastomas has revealed chromosomal amplification on 2p21, 3p, 5p15.3, 7q, 8q24, 11q22.3, and 17q. The aim of this study was to detect common oncogenes involved in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Methods: The authors studied a series of 14 samples by performing CGH and array-based CGH. The CGH analysis detected nonrandom losses on 8p, 17p, 16q, 8q, and 1p, whereas gains were found on 17q, 12q, 7q, and 1p. Array-based CGH was conducted to investigate amplification of 58 oncogenes throughout the genome of these samples. Gene amplifications identified for the first time included PGY1 at 7q21.1, MDM2 at 12q14.3-q15, and ERBB2 at 17q21.2. The highest frequencies of oncogene gain were detected in D17S1670 (61.5%), PIK3CA (46.2%), PGY1 (38.5%), MET (38.5%), ERBB2 (38.5%), and CSE1L (38.5%). The gain in gene copy numbers was confirmed in 34 additional archival medulloblastoma cases by using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

    Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide survey of multiple oncogene amplifications involved in the development of medulloblastoma. Gains of several candidate oncogenes such as D17S1670, ERBB2, PIK3CA, PGY1, MET, and CSE1L were frequently detected. These genes may be used as molecular markers and therapeutic targets of medulloblastomas.

    Journal of neurosurgery 2004;100;2 Suppl Pediatrics;187-93

Pubmed - other

  • Mutations of PIK3CA in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, high-grade astrocytomas, and medulloblastomas.

    Broderick DK, Di C, Parrett TJ, Samuels YR, Cummins JM, McLendon RE, Fults DW, Velculescu VE, Bigner DD and Yan H

    Brain Tumor Center, Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

    The phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase pathway is activated in multiple advanced cancers, including glioblastomas, through inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Recently, mutations in PIK3CA, a member of the family of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase catalytic subunits, were identified in a significant fraction (25-30%) of colorectal cancers, gastric cancers, and glioblastomas and in a smaller fraction of breast and lung cancers. These mutations were found to cluster into two major "hot spots" located in the helical and catalytic domains. To determine whether PIK3CA is genetically altered in brain tumors, we performed a large-scale mutational analysis of the helical and catalytic domains. A total of 13 mutations of PIK3CA within these specific domains were identified in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, and medulloblastomas, whereas no mutations were identified in ependymomas or low-grade astrocytomas. These observations implicate PIK3CA as an oncogene in a wider spectrum of adult and pediatric brain tumors and suggest that PIK3CA may be a useful diagnostic marker or a therapeutic target in these cancers.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 2P30 CA 14236, 5P20 CA 096890-02, R37 CA 11898-34; NINDS NIH HHS: NS 20023-21

    Cancer research 2004;64;15;5048-50

  • Role of Wnt pathway in medulloblastoma oncogenesis.

    Yokota N, Nishizawa S, Ohta S, Date H, Sugimura H, Namba H and Maekawa M

    Department of Neurosurgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan.

    To clarify the roles of Wnt pathway in medulloblastoma oncogenesis, immunohistochemical staining of beta-catenin and Wnt-1 and genomic analyses of CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) and AXIN1 (axin 1) were examined in 23 sporadic cases. Accumulation of beta-catenin in tumor cells was immunohistochemically proven in 5 cases; 2 cases showed positive immunoreactivity for Wnt-1 and another 2 showed mutation of either CTNNB1 or AXIN1. AXIN1 mutation was in exon 3, corresponding to GSK-3beta binding site and CTNNB1 mutation was in exon 3, corresponding to its phosphorylation site. Disruption of these proteins could result in upregulation of the Wnt signaling and accumulation of beta-catenin, followed by cell proliferation and medulloblastoma oncogenesis.

    International journal of cancer 2002;101;2;198-201

© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

Cookies Policy | Terms and Conditions. This site is hosted by Edinburgh University and the Genes to Cognition Programme.