G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002507
Gene symbol
RPS16 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ribosomal protein S16
Orthologue
G00001258 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000105193 (Ensembl human gene)
6217 (Entrez Gene)
948 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
RPS16 (GeneCards)
Literature
603675 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10396 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P62249 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • S16

Literature (25)

Pubmed - other

  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia: genotype-phenotype correlations in Italian patients with RPL5 and RPL11 mutations.

    Quarello P, Garelli E, Carando A, Brusco A, Calabrese R, Dufour C, Longoni D, Misuraca A, Vinti L, Aspesi A, Biondini L, Loreni F, Dianzani I and Ramenghi U

    Hematology Unit, Pediatric Department, University of Torino Piazza Polonia 94, 10126 Torino, Italy.

    Background: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, pure red blood cell aplasia of childhood due to an intrinsic defect in erythropoietic progenitors. About 40% of patients display various malformations. Anemia is corrected by steroid treatment in more than 50% of cases; non-responders need chronic transfusions or stem cell transplantation. Defects in the RPS19 gene, encoding the ribosomal protein S19, are the main known cause of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and account for more than 25% of cases. Mutations in RPS24, RPS17, and RPL35A described in a minority of patients show that Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of ribosome biogenesis. Two new genes (RPL5, RPL11), encoding for ribosomal proteins of the large subunit, have been reported to be involved in a considerable percentage of patients.

    In this genotype-phenotype analysis we screened the coding sequence and intron-exon boundaries of RPS14, RPS16, RPS24, RPL5, RPL11, and RPL35A in 92 Italian patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia who were negative for RPS19 mutations.

    Results: About 20% of the patients screened had mutations in RPL5 or RPL11, and only 1.6% in RPS24. All but three mutations that we report here are new mutations. No mutations were found in RPS14, RPS16, or RPL35A. Remarkably, we observed a higher percentage of somatic malformations in patients with RPL5 and RPL11 mutations. A close association was evident between RPL5 mutations and craniofacial malformations, and between hand malformations and RPL11 mutations.

    Conclusions: Mutations in four ribosomal proteins account for around 50% of all cases of Diamond-Blackfan anemia in Italian patients. Genotype-phenotype data suggest that mutation screening should begin with RPL5 and RPL11 in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with malformations.

    Funded by: Telethon: GGP07242

    Haematologica 2010;95;2;206-13

  • Interactions of human ribosomal proteins S16 and S5 with an 18S rRNA fragment containing their binding sites.

    Malygin AA, Yanshina DD and Karpova GG

    Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Lavrentieva 8, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia.

    Human ribosomal proteins S5e and S16e are the homologues of prokaryotic S7p and S9p, respectively. It was shown that S5e and S16e are capable of the specific binding with a rRNA transcript corresponding to the region of human 18S rRNA containing helices H28-30 and H41-43 (3Dm), which is homologous to the region in 16S rRNA containing the entire binding site for S7p and the major part of the site for S9p. We have studied binding of S5e and S16e to 3Dm and demonstrated that while each of them is able to bind to the rRNA transcript independently, their simultaneous binding has a noticeable synergetic effect. Using enzymatic footprinting, we showed that these proteins protect 3Dm against hydrolysis with RNases mainly in the regions homologous to the sites of S7p and S9p binding on the 16S rRNA. At the same time, we found regions that correspond to 16S rRNA fragments distant from the binding sites of the respective homologous prokaryotic proteins. Comparison of these results with the data on 3Dm footprinting in binary complexes with S5e or S16e revealed that each of these proteins affects binding of another one to 3Dm, which is displayed in significant expansion of 3Dm sites protected by the proteins against hydrolysis in the ternary complex.

    Biochimie 2009;91;9;1180-6

  • The role of human ribosomal proteins in the maturation of rRNA and ribosome production.

    Robledo S, Idol RA, Crimmins DL, Ladenson JH, Mason PJ and Bessler M

    Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

    Production of ribosomes is a fundamental process that occurs in all dividing cells. It is a complex process consisting of the coordinated synthesis and assembly of four ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) with about 80 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) involving more than 150 nonribosomal proteins and other factors. Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited red cell aplasia caused by mutations in one of several r-proteins. How defects in r-proteins, essential for proliferation in all cells, lead to a human disease with a specific defect in red cell development is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of r-proteins in ribosome biogenesis in order to find out whether those mutated in DBA have any similarities. We depleted HeLa cells using siRNA for several individual r-proteins of the small (RPS6, RPS7, RPS15, RPS16, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS25, RPS28) or large subunit (RPL5, RPL7, RPL11, RPL14, RPL26, RPL35a) and studied the effect on rRNA processing and ribosome production. Depleting r-proteins in one of the subunits caused, with a few exceptions, a decrease in all r-proteins of the same subunit and a decrease in the corresponding subunit, fully assembled ribosomes, and polysomes. R-protein depletion, with a few exceptions, led to the accumulation of specific rRNA precursors, highlighting their individual roles in rRNA processing. Depletion of r-proteins mutated in DBA always compromised ribosome biogenesis while affecting either subunit and disturbing rRNA processing at different levels, indicating that the rate of ribosome production rather than a specific step in ribosome biogenesis is critical in patients with DBA.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA106995, R01 CA106995; NIDDK NIH HHS: DK075443, R21 DK075443

    RNA (New York, N.Y.) 2008;14;9;1918-29

  • [Binding of human ribosomal protein S16 with the 18S rRNA fragment 1203-1236/1521-1698].

    Ian'shina DD, Malygin AA and Karpova GG

    Human ribosomal protein (rp) S16 is a homologue of prokaryotic rpS9 that contacts the 16S rRNA region formed by helices H29, H30. H38-40, H41, H43 according to X-ray crystallography data on the 30S ribosomal subunit. In the present work, we report studying interaction of human recombinant rpS16 with a RNA transcript corresponding to the region 1203-1236/1521-1698 (helices H28-30 and H41-43) of human 18S rRNA, which is homologous to the 16S rRNA region known to bind rpS9. RpS16 was shown to specifically bind to the transcript forming a stable complex with the apparent dissociation constant of (1.3 +/- 0.1) x 10(-8) M at 20 degrees C. Nucleotide residues of the transcript that change their accessibility to RNases and modifying chemical probes upon the rpS16 binding were determined by enzymatic and chemical footprinting. It was shown that rpS16 causes significant enhancement of reactivities of nucleotides C1544 (internal loop of helix H41), C1618-U1622 and C1629-A1634 (helix H42), C1521-C1523, U1530, C1532 (helix H30) and C1645, C1646, G1648 (helix H43) and protection of nucleotides C1670-A1675 (helix H43). In the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit many of those nucleotides of 16S rRNA that correspond to 18S rRNA nucleotides mentioned above contact rpS9 amino acid residues.

    Molekuliarnaia biologiia 2007;41;6;1023-30

  • Proteomics analysis of the interactome of N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 and its interactions with the androgen response program in prostate cancer cells.

    Tu LC, Yan X, Hood L and Lin B

    Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington 98103, USA.

    NDRG1 is known to play important roles in both androgen-induced cell differentiation and inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis. However, the proteins associated with NDRG1 function are not fully enumerated. Using coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 58 proteins that interact with NDRG1 in prostate cancer cells. These proteins include nuclear proteins, adhesion molecules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperons, proteasome subunits, and signaling proteins. Integration of our data with protein-protein interaction data from the Human Proteome Reference Database allowed us to build a comprehensive interactome map of NDRG1. This interactome map consists of several modules such as a nuclear module and a cell membrane module; these modules explain the reported versatile functions of NDRG1. We also determined that serine 330 and threonine 366 of NDRG1 were phosphorylated and demonstrated that the phosphorylation of NDRG1 was prominently mediated by protein kinase A (PKA). Further, we showed that NDRG1 directly binds to beta-catenin and E-cadherin. However, the phosphorylation of NDRG1 did not interrupt the binding of NDRG1 to E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Finally, we showed that the inhibition of NDRG1 expression by RNA interference decreased the ER inducible chaperon GRP94 expression, directly proving that NDRG1 is involved in the ER stress response. Intriguingly, we observed that many members of the NDRG1 interactome are androgen-regulated and that the NDRG1 interactome links to the androgen response network through common interactions with beta-catenin and heat shock protein 90. Therefore we overlaid the transcriptomic expression changes in the NDRG1 interactome in response to androgen treatment and built a dual dynamic picture of the NDRG1 interactome in response to androgen. This interactome map provides the first road map for understanding the functions of NDRG1 in cells and its roles in human diseases, such as prostate cancer, which can progress from androgen-dependent curable stages to androgen-independent incurable stages.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 1U54CA119347, 5P01CA085859, 5P50CA097186; NIDA NIH HHS: 1U54DA021519; NIGMS NIH HHS: 1P50GM076547, P50 GM076547

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2007;6;4;575-88

  • Human ribosomal protein S13 regulates expression of its own gene at the splicing step by a feedback mechanism.

    Malygin AA, Parakhnevitch NM, Ivanov AV, Eperon IC and Karpova GG

    Institute for Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.

    The expression of ribosomal protein (rp) genes is regulated at multiple levels. In yeast, two genes are autoregulated by feedback effects of the protein on pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we have investigated whether similar mechanisms occur in eukaryotes with more complicated and highly regulated splicing patterns. Comparisons of the sequences of ribosomal protein S13 gene (RPS13) among mammals and birds revealed that intron 1 is more conserved than the other introns. Transfection of HEK 293 cells with a minigene-expressing ribosomal protein S13 showed that the presence of intron 1 reduced expression by a factor of four. Ribosomal protein S13 was found to inhibit excision of intron 1 from rpS13 pre-mRNA fragment in vitro. This protein was shown to be able to specifically bind the fragment and to confer protection against ribonuclease cleavage at sequences near the 5' and 3' splice sites. The results suggest that overproduction of rpS13 in mammalian cells interferes with splicing of its own pre-mRNA by a feedback mechanism.

    Nucleic acids research 2007;35;19;6414-23

  • Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom-Cerajewski L, Robinson MD, O'Connor L, Li M, Taylor R, Dharsee M, Ho Y, Heilbut A, Moore L, Zhang S, Ornatsky O, Bukhman YV, Ethier M, Sheng Y, Vasilescu J, Abu-Farha M, Lambert JP, Duewel HS, Stewart II, Kuehl B, Hogue K, Colwill K, Gladwish K, Muskat B, Kinach R, Adams SL, Moran MF, Morin GB, Topaloglou T and Figeys D

    Protana, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

    Molecular systems biology 2007;3;89

  • Mass spectrometric analysis of the human 40S ribosomal subunit: native and HCV IRES-bound complexes.

    Yu Y, Ji H, Doudna JA and Leary JA

    Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley 94720, USA.

    Hepatitis C virus uses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in the viral RNA to directly recruit human 40S ribosome subunits during cap-independent translation initiation. Although IRES-mediated translation initiation is not subject to many of the regulatory mechanisms that control cap-dependent translation initiation, it is unknown whether other noncanonical protein factors are involved in this process. Thus, a global protein composition analysis of native and IRES-bound 40S ribosomal complexes has been conducted to facilitate an understanding of the IRES ribosome recruitment mechanism. A combined top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry approach was used to identify both the proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in the native 40S subunit and the IRES recruited translation initiation complex. Thirty-one out of a possible 32 ribosomal proteins were identified by combining top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry techniques. Proteins were found to contain PTMs, including loss of methionine, acetylation, methylation, and disulfide bond formation. In addition to the 40S ribosomal proteins, RACK1 was consistently identified in the 40S fraction, indicating that this protein is associated with the 40S subunit. Similar methodology was then applied to the hepatitis C virus IRES-bound 40S complex. Two 40S ribosomal proteins, RS25 and RS29, were found to contain different PTMs than those in the native 40S subunit. In addition, RACK1, eukaryotic initiation factor 3 proteins and nucleolin were identified in the IRES-mediated translation initiation complex.

    Protein science : a publication of the Protein Society 2005;14;6;1438-46

  • Nucleolar proteome dynamics.

    Andersen JS, Lam YW, Leung AK, Ong SE, Lyon CE, Lamond AI and Mann M

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.

    The nucleolus is a key organelle that coordinates the synthesis and assembly of ribosomal subunits and forms in the nucleus around the repeated ribosomal gene clusters. Because the production of ribosomes is a major metabolic activity, the function of the nucleolus is tightly linked to cell growth and proliferation, and recent data suggest that the nucleolus also plays an important role in cell-cycle regulation, senescence and stress responses. Here, using mass-spectrometry-based organellar proteomics and stable isotope labelling, we perform a quantitative analysis of the proteome of human nucleoli. In vivo fluorescent imaging techniques are directly compared to endogenous protein changes measured by proteomics. We characterize the flux of 489 endogenous nucleolar proteins in response to three different metabolic inhibitors that each affect nucleolar morphology. Proteins that are stably associated, such as RNA polymerase I subunits and small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle complexes, exit from or accumulate in the nucleolus with similar kinetics, whereas protein components of the large and small ribosomal subunits leave the nucleolus with markedly different kinetics. The data establish a quantitative proteomic approach for the temporal characterization of protein flux through cellular organelles and demonstrate that the nucleolar proteome changes significantly over time in response to changes in cellular growth conditions.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust: 073980

    Nature 2005;433;7021;77-83

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • A physical and functional map of the human TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway.

    Bouwmeester T, Bauch A, Ruffner H, Angrand PO, Bergamini G, Croughton K, Cruciat C, Eberhard D, Gagneur J, Ghidelli S, Hopf C, Huhse B, Mangano R, Michon AM, Schirle M, Schlegl J, Schwab M, Stein MA, Bauer A, Casari G, Drewes G, Gavin AC, Jackson DB, Joberty G, Neubauer G, Rick J, Kuster B and Superti-Furga G

    Cellzome AG, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. tewis.bouwmeester@cellzome.com

    Signal transduction pathways are modular composites of functionally interdependent sets of proteins that act in a coordinated fashion to transform environmental information into a phenotypic response. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha triggers a signalling cascade, converging on the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, which forms the basis for numerous physiological and pathological processes. Here we report the mapping of a protein interaction network around 32 known and candidate TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway components by using an integrated approach comprising tandem affinity purification, liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, network analysis and directed functional perturbation studies using RNA interference. We identified 221 molecular associations and 80 previously unknown interactors, including 10 new functional modulators of the pathway. This systems approach provides significant insight into the logic of the TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway and is generally applicable to other pathways relevant to human disease.

    Nature cell biology 2004;6;2;97-105

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • The molecular mechanics of eukaryotic translation.

    Kapp LD and Lorsch JR

    Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2185, USA. lkapp@jhmi.edu

    Great advances have been made in the past three decades in understanding the molecular mechanics underlying protein synthesis in bacteria, but our understanding of the corresponding events in eukaryotic organisms is only beginning to catch up. In this review we describe the current state of our knowledge and ignorance of the molecular mechanics underlying eukaryotic translation. We discuss the mechanisms conserved across the three kingdoms of life as well as the important divergences that have taken place in the pathway.

    Annual review of biochemistry 2004;73;657-704

  • Transcript-selective translational silencing by gamma interferon is directed by a novel structural element in the ceruloplasmin mRNA 3' untranslated region.

    Sampath P, Mazumder B, Seshadri V and Fox PL

    Department of Cell Biology, The Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

    Transcript-selective translational control of eukaryotic gene expression is often directed by a structural element in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the mRNA. In the case of ceruloplasmin (Cp), induced synthesis of the protein by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in U937 monocytic cells is halted by a delayed translational silencing mechanism requiring the binding of a cytosolic inhibitor to the Cp 3'-UTR. Silencing requires the essential elements of mRNA circularization, i.e., eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, poly(A)-binding protein, and poly(A) tail. We here determined the minimal silencing element in the Cp 3'-UTR by progressive deletions from both termini. A minimal, 29-nucleotide (nt) element was determined by gel shift assay to be sufficient for maximal binding of the IFN-gamma-activated inhibitor of translation (GAIT), an as-yet-unidentified protein or complex. The interaction was shown to be functional by an in vitro translation assay in which the GAIT element was used as a decoy to overcome translational silencing. Mutation analysis showed that the GAIT element contained a 5-nt terminal loop, a weak 3-bp helix, an asymmetric internal bulge, and a proximal 6-bp helical stem. Two invariant loop residues essential for binding activity were identified. Ligation of the GAIT element immediately downstream of a luciferase reporter conferred the translational silencing response to the heterologous transcript in vitro and in vivo; a construct containing a nonbinding, mutated GAIT element was ineffective. Translational silencing of Cp, and possibly other transcripts, mediated by the GAIT element may contribute to the resolution of the local inflammatory response following cytokine activation of macrophages.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL29582, HL67725, P01 HL029582, R01 HL067725

    Molecular and cellular biology 2003;23;5;1509-19

  • Expression profile of differentially-regulated genes during progression of androgen-independent growth in human prostate cancer cells.

    Karan D, Kelly DL, Rizzino A, Lin MF and Batra SK

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-4525, USA.

    Because of the heterogeneous nature of prostate cancer, identifying the molecular mechanisms involved during the transition from an androgen-sensitive to an androgen-independent phenotype is very complex. An LNCaP cell model that recapitulates prostate cancer progression, comprising early passage androgen-sensitive (LNCaP-C33) and late passage androgen-independent (LNCaP-C81) phenotypes, would help to provide a better understanding of such molecular events. In this study, we examined the genes expressed by LNCaP-C33 and LNCaP-C81 cells using cDNA microarrays containing 1176 known genes. This analysis demonstrated that 34 genes are up-regulated and eight genes are down-regulated in androgen-independent cells. Northern blot analysis confirmed the differences identified by microarrays on several candidate genes, including c-MYC, c-MYC purine-binding transcription factor (PuF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A), guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gi, alpha-1 subunit (NBP), cyclin dependent kinase-2 (CDK-2), prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM), cyclin H (CCNH), 60S ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10), 60S ribosomal protein L32 (RPL32), and 40S ribosomal protein S16 (RPS16). These differentially-regulated genes are correlated with progression of human prostate cancer and may be of therapeutic relevance as well as an aid in understanding the molecular genetic events involved in the development of this disease's hormone-refractory behavior.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA 88184

    Carcinogenesis 2002;23;6;967-75

  • The human ribosomal protein genes: sequencing and comparative analysis of 73 genes.

    Yoshihama M, Uechi T, Asakawa S, Kawasaki K, Kato S, Higa S, Maeda N, Minoshima S, Tanaka T, Shimizu N and Kenmochi N

    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan.

    The ribosome, as a catalyst for protein synthesis, is universal and essential for all organisms. Here we describe the structure of the genes encoding human ribosomal proteins (RPs) and compare this class of genes among several eukaryotes. Using genomic and full-length cDNA sequences, we characterized 73 RP genes and found that (1) transcription starts at a C residue within a characteristic oligopyrimidine tract; (2) the promoter region is GC rich, but often has a TATA box or similar sequence element; (3) the genes are small (4.4 kb), but have as many as 5.6 exons on average; (4) the initiator ATG is in the first or second exon and is within plus minus 5 bp of the first intron boundaries in about half of cases; and (5) 5'- and 3'-UTRs are significantly smaller (42 bp and 56 bp, respectively) than the genome average. Comparison of RP genes from humans, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed the coding sequences to be highly conserved (63% homology on average), although gene size and the number of exons vary. The positions of the introns are also conserved among these species as follows: 44% of human introns are present at the same position in either D. melanogaster or C. elegans, suggesting RP genes are highly suitable for studying the evolution of introns.

    Genome research 2002;12;3;379-90

  • Directed proteomic analysis of the human nucleolus.

    Andersen JS, Lyon CE, Fox AH, Leung AK, Lam YW, Steen H, Mann M and Lamond AI

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense M, Denmark.

    Background: The nucleolus is a subnuclear organelle containing the ribosomal RNA gene clusters and ribosome biogenesis factors. Recent studies suggest it may also have roles in RNA transport, RNA modification, and cell cycle regulation. Despite over 150 years of research into nucleoli, many aspects of their structure and function remain uncharacterized.

    Results: We report a proteomic analysis of human nucleoli. Using a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) and sequence database searches, including online analysis of the draft human genome sequence, 271 proteins were identified. Over 30% of the nucleolar proteins were encoded by novel or uncharacterized genes, while the known proteins included several unexpected factors with no previously known nucleolar functions. MS analysis of nucleoli isolated from HeLa cells in which transcription had been inhibited showed that a subset of proteins was enriched. These data highlight the dynamic nature of the nucleolar proteome and show that proteins can either associate with nucleoli transiently or accumulate only under specific metabolic conditions.

    Conclusions: This extensive proteomic analysis shows that nucleoli have a surprisingly large protein complexity. The many novel factors and separate classes of proteins identified support the view that the nucleolus may perform additional functions beyond its known role in ribosome subunit biogenesis. The data also show that the protein composition of nucleoli is not static and can alter significantly in response to the metabolic state of the cell.

    Current biology : CB 2002;12;1;1-11

  • Functional analysis of the human CDC5L complex and identification of its components by mass spectrometry.

    Ajuh P, Kuster B, Panov K, Zomerdijk JC, Mann M and Lamond AI

    Department of Biochemistry, The University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK.

    Recently, we identified proteins that co-purify with the human spliceosome using mass spectrometry. One of the identified proteins, CDC5L, corresponds to the human homologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC5(+) gene product. Here we show that CDC5L is part of a larger multiprotein complex in HeLa nuclear extract that incorporates into the spliceosome in an ATP-dependent step. We also show that this complex is required for the second catalytic step of pre-mRNA splicing. Immunodepletion of the CDC5L complex from HeLa nuclear extract inhibits the formation of pre-mRNA splicing products in vitro but does not prevent spliceosome assembly. The first catalytic step of pre-mRNA splicing is less affected by immunodepleting the complex. The purified CDC5L complex in HeLa nuclear extract restores pre-mRNA splicing activity when added to extracts that have been immunodepleted using anti-CDC5L antibodies. Using mass spectrometry and database searches, the major protein components of the CDC5L complex have been identified. This work reports a first purification and characterization of a functional, human non-snRNA spliceosome subunit containing CDC5L and at least five additional protein factors.

    The EMBO journal 2000;19;23;6569-81

  • Human Cdc5, a regulator of mitotic entry, can act as a site-specific DNA binding protein.

    Lei XH, Shen X, Xu XQ and Bernstein HS

    Department of Pediatrics, Cardiovascular Research Institute and Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0130, San Francisco, California 94143-0130, USA.

    G(2)/M progression requires coordinated expression of many gene products, but little is known about the transcriptional regulators involved. We recently identified human Cdc5, a positive regulator of G(2)/M in mammalian cells. We also demonstrated the presence of a latent activation domain in its carboxyl terminus, suggesting that human Cdc5 regulates G(2)/M through transcriptional activation. Despite the presence of a DNA binding domain, studies by others have failed to identify a preferential binding site for Cdc5 family members. In addition, Cdc5 recently has been associated with the splicesome in several organisms, suggesting that it may not act through DNA binding. We now report the identification of a 12 bp sequence to which human Cdc5 binds specifically and with high affinity through its amino terminus. We show that this DNA-protein interaction is capable of activating transcription. We also used a selection system in yeast to identify human genomic fragments that interact with human Cdc5. Several of these contained sequences similar to the binding site. We demonstrate that these bind human Cdc5 with similar specificity and affinity. These experiments provide the first evidence that Cdc5 family members can act as site-specific DNA binding proteins, and that human Cdc5 may interact with specific, low abundance sequences in the human genome. This raises the possibility that Cdc5 proteins may participate in more than one process necessary for regulated cell division.

    Journal of cell science 2000;113 Pt 24;4523-31

  • A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes.

    Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S, Davis E, Goodman N, Hudson TJ, Tanaka T and Page DC

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kenmochi@med.u-ryuku.ac.jp

    We mapped 75 genes that collectively encode >90% of the proteins found in human ribosomes. Because localization of ribosomal protein genes (rp genes) is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes, multiple strategies were devised to identify PCR-detectable sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns. In some cases we exploited specific, pre-existing information about the intron/exon structure of a given human rp gene or its homolog in another vertebrate. When such information was unavailable, selection of PCR primer pairs was guided by general insights gleaned from analysis of all mammalian rp genes whose intron/exon structures have been published. For many genes, PCR amplification of introns was facilitated by use of YAC pool DNAs rather than total human genomic DNA as templates. We then assigned the rp gene STSs to individual human chromosomes by typing human-rodent hybrid cell lines. The genes were placed more precisely on the physical map of the human genome by typing of radiation hybrids or screening YAC libraries. Fifty-one previously unmapped rp genes were localized, and 24 previously reported rp gene localizations were confirmed, refined, or corrected. Though functionally related and coordinately expressed, the 75 mapped genes are widely dispersed: Both sex chromosomes and at least 20 of the 22 autosomes carry one or more rp genes. Chromosome 19, known to have a high gene density, contains an unusually large number of rp genes (12). This map provides a foundation for the study of the possible roles of ribosomal protein deficiencies in chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Genome research 1998;8;5;509-23

  • Characterization of the human small-ribosomal-subunit proteins by N-terminal and internal sequencing, and mass spectrometry.

    Vladimirov SN, Ivanov AV, Karpova GG, Musolyamov AK, Egorov TA, Thiede B, Wittmann-Liebold B and Otto A

    Novosibirsk Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation.

    Reverse-phase HPLC was used to fractionate 40S ribosomal proteins from human placenta. Application of a C4 reverse-phase column allowed us to obtain 27 well-resolved peaks. The protein composition of each chromatographic fraction was established by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. N-terminally blocked proteins were cleaved with endoproteinase Lys-C, and suitable peptides were sequenced. All sequences were compared with those of ribosomal proteins available from data bases. This allowed us to identify all proteins from the 40S human ribosomal subunit in the HPLC elution profile. By matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry the masses of the 40S proteins were determined and checked for the presence of post-translational modifications. For several proteins differences to the deduced sequences and the calculated masses were found to be due to post-translational modifications.

    European journal of biochemistry 1996;239;1;144-9

  • Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins.

    Wool IG, Chan YL and Glück A

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

    Mammalian (rat) ribosomes have 80 proteins; the sequence of amino acids in 75 have been determined. What has been learned of the structure of the rat ribosomal proteins is reviewed with particular attention to their evolution and to amino acid sequence motifs. The latter include: clusters of basic or acidic residues; sequence repeats or shared sequences; zinc finger domains; bZIP elements; and nuclear localization signals. The occurrence and the possible significance of phosphorylated residues and of ubiquitin extensions is noted. The characteristics of the mRNAs that encode the proteins are summarized. The relationship of the rat ribosomal proteins to the proteins in ribosomes from humans, yeast, archaebacteria, and Escherichia coli is collated.

    Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire 1995;73;11-12;933-47

  • Construction of a human full-length cDNA bank.

    Kato S, Sekine S, Oh SW, Kim NS, Umezawa Y, Abe N, Yokoyama-Kobayashi M and Aoki T

    Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Japan.

    We aimed to construct a full-length cDNA bank from an entire set of human genes and to analyze the function of a protein encoded by each cDNA. To achieve this purpose, a multifunctional phagemid shuttle vector, pKA1, was constructed for preparing a high-quality cDNA library composed of full-length cDNA clones which can be sequenced and expressed in vitro and in mammalian cells without subcloning the cDNA fragment into other vectors. Using this as a vector primer, we have prepared a prototype of the bank composed of full-length cDNAs encoding 236 human proteins whose amino acid sequences are identical or similar to known proteins. Most cDNAs contain a putative cap site sequence, some of which show a pyrimidine-rich conserved sequence exhibiting polymorphism. It was confirmed that the vector permits efficient in vitro translation, expression in mammalian cells and the preparation of nested deletion mutants.

    Gene 1994;150;2;243-50

  • Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the human ribosomal protein S16.

    Batra SK, Metzgar RS and Hollingsworth MA

    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710.

    A cDNA library from a poorly differentiated human pancreatic tumor cell line was screened for differentially expressed mRNAs using single-stranded cDNA probes synthesized from poly(A+) RNA of the poorly differentiated cell line Panc 1 and a very well differentiated cell line CD11. One of the cDNA clones isolated hybridized to a transcript size of 650 base pairs on Northern blot analysis and showed 30-fold higher expression in the poorly differentiated cell line as compared with the well differentiated cell line. Sequence analysis of this cDNA clone and its deduced amino acid sequence showed an open reading frame of 441 nucleotides with 100 and 98.6% homology to ribosomal protein S16 (rpS16) from rat and mouse, respectively. Northern blot analyses with a panel of 14 pancreatic cell lines, 2 breast cell lines, 2 colon cell lines, and several other tissues showed higher expression of rpS16 only in the poorly differentiated pancreatic tumor cell line Panc 1. The expression of mRNA for two other ribosomal proteins, rpL30 and rpL32, were not elevated in Panc 1. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA showed a 20-fold amplification of a single band among the rpS16 family only in the Panc 1 cell line.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: CA 47507

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1991;266;11;6830-3

Gene lists (4)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

Cookies Policy | Terms and Conditions. This site is hosted by Edinburgh University and the Genes to Cognition Programme.