G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002505
Gene symbol
RPL38 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ribosomal protein L38
Orthologue
G00001256 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000172809 (Ensembl human gene)
6169 (Entrez Gene)
930 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
RPL38 (GeneCards)
Literature
604182 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10349 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P63173 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • L38

Literature (13)

Pubmed - other

  • Systematic analysis of the protein interaction network for the human transcription machinery reveals the identity of the 7SK capping enzyme.

    Jeronimo C, Forget D, Bouchard A, Li Q, Chua G, Poitras C, Thérien C, Bergeron D, Bourassa S, Greenblatt J, Chabot B, Poirier GG, Hughes TR, Blanchette M, Price DH and Coulombe B

    Laboratory of Gene Transcription and Proteomics Discovery Platform, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.

    We have performed a survey of soluble human protein complexes containing components of the transcription and RNA processing machineries using protein affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry. Thirty-two tagged polypeptides yielded a network of 805 high-confidence interactions. Remarkably, the network is significantly enriched in proteins that regulate the formation of protein complexes, including a number of previously uncharacterized proteins for which we have inferred functions. The RNA polymerase II (RNAP II)-associated proteins (RPAPs) are physically and functionally associated with RNAP II, forming an interface between the enzyme and chaperone/scaffolding proteins. BCDIN3 is the 7SK snRNA methylphosphate capping enzyme (MePCE) present in an snRNP complex containing both RNA processing and transcription factors, including the elongation factor P-TEFb. Our results define a high-density protein interaction network for the mammalian transcription machinery and uncover multiple regulatory factors that target the transcription machinery.

    Funded by: Canadian Institutes of Health Research: 14309-3, 82851-1

    Molecular cell 2007;27;2;262-74

  • Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom-Cerajewski L, Robinson MD, O'Connor L, Li M, Taylor R, Dharsee M, Ho Y, Heilbut A, Moore L, Zhang S, Ornatsky O, Bukhman YV, Ethier M, Sheng Y, Vasilescu J, Abu-Farha M, Lambert JP, Duewel HS, Stewart II, Kuehl B, Hogue K, Colwill K, Gladwish K, Muskat B, Kinach R, Adams SL, Moran MF, Morin GB, Topaloglou T and Figeys D

    Protana, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

    Molecular systems biology 2007;3;89

  • A systematic analysis of human CHMP protein interactions: additional MIT domain-containing proteins bind to multiple components of the human ESCRT III complex.

    Tsang HT, Connell JW, Brown SE, Thompson A, Reid E and Sanderson CM

    Department of Medical Genetics and Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2XY, UK.

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6 closely related proteins (Did2p, Vps2p, Vps24p, Vps32p, Vps60p, Vps20p) form part of the extended ESCRT III complex. This complex is required for the formation of multivesicular bodies and the degradation of internalized transmembrane receptor proteins. In contrast the human genome encodes 10 homologous proteins (CHMP1A (approved gene symbol PCOLN3), 1B, 2A, 2B, 3 (approved gene symbol VPS24), 4A, 4B, 4C, 5, and 6). In this study we have performed a series of protein interaction experiments to generate a more comprehensive picture of the human CHMP protein-interaction network. Our results describe novel interactions between known components of the human ESCRT III complex and identify a range of putative binding partners, which may indicate new ways in which the function of human CHMP proteins may be regulated. In particular, we show that two further MIT domain-containing proteins (AMSH/STAMBP and LOC129531) interact with multiple components of the human ESCRT III complex.

    Genomics 2006;88;3;333-46

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • A physical and functional map of the human TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway.

    Bouwmeester T, Bauch A, Ruffner H, Angrand PO, Bergamini G, Croughton K, Cruciat C, Eberhard D, Gagneur J, Ghidelli S, Hopf C, Huhse B, Mangano R, Michon AM, Schirle M, Schlegl J, Schwab M, Stein MA, Bauer A, Casari G, Drewes G, Gavin AC, Jackson DB, Joberty G, Neubauer G, Rick J, Kuster B and Superti-Furga G

    Cellzome AG, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. tewis.bouwmeester@cellzome.com

    Signal transduction pathways are modular composites of functionally interdependent sets of proteins that act in a coordinated fashion to transform environmental information into a phenotypic response. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha triggers a signalling cascade, converging on the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, which forms the basis for numerous physiological and pathological processes. Here we report the mapping of a protein interaction network around 32 known and candidate TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway components by using an integrated approach comprising tandem affinity purification, liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, network analysis and directed functional perturbation studies using RNA interference. We identified 221 molecular associations and 80 previously unknown interactors, including 10 new functional modulators of the pathway. This systems approach provides significant insight into the logic of the TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway and is generally applicable to other pathways relevant to human disease.

    Nature cell biology 2004;6;2;97-105

  • The molecular mechanics of eukaryotic translation.

    Kapp LD and Lorsch JR

    Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2185, USA. lkapp@jhmi.edu

    Great advances have been made in the past three decades in understanding the molecular mechanics underlying protein synthesis in bacteria, but our understanding of the corresponding events in eukaryotic organisms is only beginning to catch up. In this review we describe the current state of our knowledge and ignorance of the molecular mechanics underlying eukaryotic translation. We discuss the mechanisms conserved across the three kingdoms of life as well as the important divergences that have taken place in the pathway.

    Annual review of biochemistry 2004;73;657-704

  • Regulated release of L13a from the 60S ribosomal subunit as a mechanism of transcript-specific translational control.

    Mazumder B, Sampath P, Seshadri V, Maitra RK, DiCorleto PE and Fox PL

    Department of Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

    Transcript-specific translational control is generally directed by binding of trans-acting proteins to structural elements in the untranslated region (UTR) of the target mRNA. Here, we elucidate a translational silencing mechanism involving regulated release of an integral ribosomal protein and subsequent binding to its target mRNA. Human ribosomal protein L13a was identified as a candidate interferon-Gamma-Activated Inhibitor of Translation (GAIT) of ceruloplasmin (Cp) mRNA by a genetic screen for Cp 3'-UTR binding proteins. In vitro activity of L13a was shown by inhibition of target mRNA translation by recombinant protein. In response to interferon-gamma in vivo, the entire cellular pool of L13a was phosphorylated and released from the 60S ribosomal subunit. Released L13a specifically bound the 3'-UTR GAIT element of Cp mRNA and silenced translation. We propose a model in which the ribosome functions not only as a protein synthesis machine, but also as a depot for regulatory proteins that modulate translation.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL29582, HL67725

    Cell 2003;115;2;187-98

  • The human ribosomal protein genes: sequencing and comparative analysis of 73 genes.

    Yoshihama M, Uechi T, Asakawa S, Kawasaki K, Kato S, Higa S, Maeda N, Minoshima S, Tanaka T, Shimizu N and Kenmochi N

    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215, Japan.

    The ribosome, as a catalyst for protein synthesis, is universal and essential for all organisms. Here we describe the structure of the genes encoding human ribosomal proteins (RPs) and compare this class of genes among several eukaryotes. Using genomic and full-length cDNA sequences, we characterized 73 RP genes and found that (1) transcription starts at a C residue within a characteristic oligopyrimidine tract; (2) the promoter region is GC rich, but often has a TATA box or similar sequence element; (3) the genes are small (4.4 kb), but have as many as 5.6 exons on average; (4) the initiator ATG is in the first or second exon and is within plus minus 5 bp of the first intron boundaries in about half of cases; and (5) 5'- and 3'-UTRs are significantly smaller (42 bp and 56 bp, respectively) than the genome average. Comparison of RP genes from humans, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed the coding sequences to be highly conserved (63% homology on average), although gene size and the number of exons vary. The positions of the introns are also conserved among these species as follows: 44% of human introns are present at the same position in either D. melanogaster or C. elegans, suggesting RP genes are highly suitable for studying the evolution of introns.

    Genome research 2002;12;3;379-90

  • A complete map of the human ribosomal protein genes: assignment of 80 genes to the cytogenetic map and implications for human disorders.

    Uechi T, Tanaka T and Kenmochi N

    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, 903-0215, Japan.

    Mapping of the human ribosomal protein (RP) genes has been completed, and all 80 different genes were placed on a cytogenetic map of the human genome. Because of the existence of processed pseudogenes, the localization of the RP genes was complicated, and five genes had remained to be mapped. Here we developed a novel strategy to identify sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns of the RP genes, and we localized RPL14, RPL22, RPL35, RPL36, and RPL39 within the chromosomes by radiation hybrid mapping. Unlike the case of eubacteria or archaebacteria, human RP genes are widely scattered about the genome. Together with the previous results, both sex chromosomes and 20 autosomes (all but chromosomes 7 and 21) were found to carry one or more RP genes. To explore the possible involvement of RP genes in human disorders, all 80 genes were assigned to cytogenetic bands according to a published cytogenetic BAC-STS map of the human genome. We compared the assigned positions with candidate regions for Mendelian disorders and found certain genes that might be involved in particular human disorders.

    Genomics 2001;72;3;223-30

  • A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes.

    Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S, Davis E, Goodman N, Hudson TJ, Tanaka T and Page DC

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kenmochi@med.u-ryuku.ac.jp

    We mapped 75 genes that collectively encode >90% of the proteins found in human ribosomes. Because localization of ribosomal protein genes (rp genes) is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes, multiple strategies were devised to identify PCR-detectable sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns. In some cases we exploited specific, pre-existing information about the intron/exon structure of a given human rp gene or its homolog in another vertebrate. When such information was unavailable, selection of PCR primer pairs was guided by general insights gleaned from analysis of all mammalian rp genes whose intron/exon structures have been published. For many genes, PCR amplification of introns was facilitated by use of YAC pool DNAs rather than total human genomic DNA as templates. We then assigned the rp gene STSs to individual human chromosomes by typing human-rodent hybrid cell lines. The genes were placed more precisely on the physical map of the human genome by typing of radiation hybrids or screening YAC libraries. Fifty-one previously unmapped rp genes were localized, and 24 previously reported rp gene localizations were confirmed, refined, or corrected. Though functionally related and coordinately expressed, the 75 mapped genes are widely dispersed: Both sex chromosomes and at least 20 of the 22 autosomes carry one or more rp genes. Chromosome 19, known to have a high gene density, contains an unusually large number of rp genes (12). This map provides a foundation for the study of the possible roles of ribosomal protein deficiencies in chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Genome research 1998;8;5;509-23

  • Primary sequence of the human, lysine-rich, ribosomal protein RPL38 and detection of an unusual RPL38 processed pseudogene in the promoter region of the type-1 angiotensin II receptor gene.

    Espinosa L, Martín M, Nicolas A, Fabre M and Navarro E

    UBCM - Institut Municipal d'Investigació Mèdica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human ribosomal protein L38 (HSRPL38). The longest ORF of the cDNA predicts a lysine-rich small polypeptide identical to the rat RPL38 protein (100% identity), and sharing a 84% of identity to the tomato RPL38 protein sequence. Northern blot analysis of a number of epithelial cell lines showed that the HSRPL38 is encoded by a mRNA ubiquitously expressed. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA suggested that the RPL38 does not constitute a multigene family but it is encoded by a reduced set of active genes, among which we have also found a RPL38 processed pseudogene located in the promoter region of the human type-1 angiotensin II receptor gene. This RPL38 pseudogene is very unusual among processed pseudogenes in that the poly A tail and the entire 5'-UTR of the original RPL38 mRNA were deleted during the retrotransposition process.

    Biochimica et biophysica acta 1997;1354;1;58-64

  • Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins.

    Wool IG, Chan YL and Glück A

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

    Mammalian (rat) ribosomes have 80 proteins; the sequence of amino acids in 75 have been determined. What has been learned of the structure of the rat ribosomal proteins is reviewed with particular attention to their evolution and to amino acid sequence motifs. The latter include: clusters of basic or acidic residues; sequence repeats or shared sequences; zinc finger domains; bZIP elements; and nuclear localization signals. The occurrence and the possible significance of phosphorylated residues and of ubiquitin extensions is noted. The characteristics of the mRNAs that encode the proteins are summarized. The relationship of the rat ribosomal proteins to the proteins in ribosomes from humans, yeast, archaebacteria, and Escherichia coli is collated.

    Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire 1995;73;11-12;933-47

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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