G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002421
Gene symbol
RPL3 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ribosomal protein L3
Orthologue
G00001172 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000100316 (Ensembl human gene)
6122 (Entrez Gene)
907 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
RPL3 (GeneCards)
Literature
604163 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10332 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P39023 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • L3

Literature (25)

Pubmed - other

  • Toward a confocal subcellular atlas of the human proteome.

    Barbe L, Lundberg E, Oksvold P, Stenius A, Lewin E, Björling E, Asplund A, Pontén F, Brismar H, Uhlén M and Andersson-Svahn H

    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

    Information on protein localization on the subcellular level is important to map and characterize the proteome and to better understand cellular functions of proteins. Here we report on a pilot study of 466 proteins in three human cell lines aimed to allow large scale confocal microscopy analysis using protein-specific antibodies. Approximately 3000 high resolution images were generated, and more than 80% of the analyzed proteins could be classified in one or multiple subcellular compartment(s). The localizations of the proteins showed, in many cases, good agreement with the Gene Ontology localization prediction model. This is the first large scale antibody-based study to localize proteins into subcellular compartments using antibodies and confocal microscopy. The results suggest that this approach might be a valuable tool in conjunction with predictive models for protein localization.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2008;7;3;499-508

  • Proteomics analysis of the interactome of N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 and its interactions with the androgen response program in prostate cancer cells.

    Tu LC, Yan X, Hood L and Lin B

    Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington 98103, USA.

    NDRG1 is known to play important roles in both androgen-induced cell differentiation and inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis. However, the proteins associated with NDRG1 function are not fully enumerated. Using coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis, we identified 58 proteins that interact with NDRG1 in prostate cancer cells. These proteins include nuclear proteins, adhesion molecules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperons, proteasome subunits, and signaling proteins. Integration of our data with protein-protein interaction data from the Human Proteome Reference Database allowed us to build a comprehensive interactome map of NDRG1. This interactome map consists of several modules such as a nuclear module and a cell membrane module; these modules explain the reported versatile functions of NDRG1. We also determined that serine 330 and threonine 366 of NDRG1 were phosphorylated and demonstrated that the phosphorylation of NDRG1 was prominently mediated by protein kinase A (PKA). Further, we showed that NDRG1 directly binds to beta-catenin and E-cadherin. However, the phosphorylation of NDRG1 did not interrupt the binding of NDRG1 to E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Finally, we showed that the inhibition of NDRG1 expression by RNA interference decreased the ER inducible chaperon GRP94 expression, directly proving that NDRG1 is involved in the ER stress response. Intriguingly, we observed that many members of the NDRG1 interactome are androgen-regulated and that the NDRG1 interactome links to the androgen response network through common interactions with beta-catenin and heat shock protein 90. Therefore we overlaid the transcriptomic expression changes in the NDRG1 interactome in response to androgen treatment and built a dual dynamic picture of the NDRG1 interactome in response to androgen. This interactome map provides the first road map for understanding the functions of NDRG1 in cells and its roles in human diseases, such as prostate cancer, which can progress from androgen-dependent curable stages to androgen-independent incurable stages.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 1U54CA119347, 5P01CA085859, 5P50CA097186; NIDA NIH HHS: 1U54DA021519; NIGMS NIH HHS: 1P50GM076547, P50 GM076547

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2007;6;4;575-88

  • Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom-Cerajewski L, Robinson MD, O'Connor L, Li M, Taylor R, Dharsee M, Ho Y, Heilbut A, Moore L, Zhang S, Ornatsky O, Bukhman YV, Ethier M, Sheng Y, Vasilescu J, Abu-Farha M, Lambert JP, Duewel HS, Stewart II, Kuehl B, Hogue K, Colwill K, Gladwish K, Muskat B, Kinach R, Adams SL, Moran MF, Morin GB, Topaloglou T and Figeys D

    Protana, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

    Molecular systems biology 2007;3;89

  • Genes associated with telomerase activity levels in esophageal carcinoma cell lines.

    Bergqvist M, Brattström D, Brodin D, Lindkvist A, Dahlman-Wright K, Dreilich M, Wagenius G and Paulsson-Karlsson Y

    Department of Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.

    Telomerase activity levels have been shown to correlate with tumor progression in several malignancies. However, the genetic regulation of telomerase activity levels is not fully understood. The aim of the present study has been to identify a gene expression profile, predicting correlation with the telomerase-activity test. Ten human esophageal carcinoma cell lines were investigated using the telomerase activity assay (TRAPeze) Telomerase Detection Kit), followed by further characterization using the GeneChip Human Genome U133A 2.0 Array (Affymetrics Inc., USA), including 14 500 human genes. Telomerase activity levels were detected in all cell lines with a broad range of activity levels. Using a high correlation coefficient, r > 0.90, the following genes were found to be positively correlated with telomerase activity levels: N-myristoyltransferase 2; ribosomal protein L3; retinoblastoma-like 2 (pRb2/p130); and cyclin G2. Only one gene was negatively correlated with telomerase activity levels, zinc finger protein 207. In conclusion, the present microarray data provide primary validation data indicating possible candidates for prognostic and prediction factors in esophageal cancer in relation to telomerase activity.

    Diseases of the esophagus : official journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus 2006;19;1;20-3

  • Nucleolar proteome dynamics.

    Andersen JS, Lam YW, Leung AK, Ong SE, Lyon CE, Lamond AI and Mann M

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.

    The nucleolus is a key organelle that coordinates the synthesis and assembly of ribosomal subunits and forms in the nucleus around the repeated ribosomal gene clusters. Because the production of ribosomes is a major metabolic activity, the function of the nucleolus is tightly linked to cell growth and proliferation, and recent data suggest that the nucleolus also plays an important role in cell-cycle regulation, senescence and stress responses. Here, using mass-spectrometry-based organellar proteomics and stable isotope labelling, we perform a quantitative analysis of the proteome of human nucleoli. In vivo fluorescent imaging techniques are directly compared to endogenous protein changes measured by proteomics. We characterize the flux of 489 endogenous nucleolar proteins in response to three different metabolic inhibitors that each affect nucleolar morphology. Proteins that are stably associated, such as RNA polymerase I subunits and small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle complexes, exit from or accumulate in the nucleolus with similar kinetics, whereas protein components of the large and small ribosomal subunits leave the nucleolus with markedly different kinetics. The data establish a quantitative proteomic approach for the temporal characterization of protein flux through cellular organelles and demonstrate that the nucleolar proteome changes significantly over time in response to changes in cellular growth conditions.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust: 073980

    Nature 2005;433;7021;77-83

  • Immunoaffinity profiling of tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells.

    Rush J, Moritz A, Lee KA, Guo A, Goss VL, Spek EJ, Zhang H, Zha XM, Polakiewicz RD and Comb MJ

    Cell Signaling Technology Inc., 166B Cummings Center, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915, USA.

    Tyrosine kinases play a prominent role in human cancer, yet the oncogenic signaling pathways driving cell proliferation and survival have been difficult to identify, in part because of the complexity of the pathways and in part because of low cellular levels of tyrosine phosphorylation. In general, global phosphoproteomic approaches reveal small numbers of peptides containing phosphotyrosine. We have developed a strategy that emphasizes the phosphotyrosine component of the phosphoproteome and identifies large numbers of tyrosine phosphorylation sites. Peptides containing phosphotyrosine are isolated directly from protease-digested cellular protein extracts with a phosphotyrosine-specific antibody and are identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to several cell systems, including cancer cell lines, shows it can be used to identify activated protein kinases and their phosphorylated substrates without prior knowledge of the signaling networks that are activated, a first step in profiling normal and oncogenic signaling networks.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: 1R43CA101106

    Nature biotechnology 2005;23;1;94-101

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • A physical and functional map of the human TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway.

    Bouwmeester T, Bauch A, Ruffner H, Angrand PO, Bergamini G, Croughton K, Cruciat C, Eberhard D, Gagneur J, Ghidelli S, Hopf C, Huhse B, Mangano R, Michon AM, Schirle M, Schlegl J, Schwab M, Stein MA, Bauer A, Casari G, Drewes G, Gavin AC, Jackson DB, Joberty G, Neubauer G, Rick J, Kuster B and Superti-Furga G

    Cellzome AG, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. tewis.bouwmeester@cellzome.com

    Signal transduction pathways are modular composites of functionally interdependent sets of proteins that act in a coordinated fashion to transform environmental information into a phenotypic response. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha triggers a signalling cascade, converging on the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, which forms the basis for numerous physiological and pathological processes. Here we report the mapping of a protein interaction network around 32 known and candidate TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway components by using an integrated approach comprising tandem affinity purification, liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, network analysis and directed functional perturbation studies using RNA interference. We identified 221 molecular associations and 80 previously unknown interactors, including 10 new functional modulators of the pathway. This systems approach provides significant insight into the logic of the TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway and is generally applicable to other pathways relevant to human disease.

    Nature cell biology 2004;6;2;97-105

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • A genome annotation-driven approach to cloning the human ORFeome.

    Collins JE, Wright CL, Edwards CA, Davis MP, Grinham JA, Cole CG, Goward ME, Aguado B, Mallya M, Mokrab Y, Huckle EJ, Beare DM and Dunham I

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SA, UK.

    We have developed a systematic approach to generating cDNA clones containing full-length open reading frames (ORFs), exploiting knowledge of gene structure from genomic sequence. Each ORF was amplified by PCR from a pool of primary cDNAs, cloned and confirmed by sequencing. We obtained clones representing 70% of genes on human chromosome 22, whereas searching available cDNA clone collections found at best 48% from a single collection and 60% for all collections combined.

    Genome biology 2004;5;10;R84

  • The molecular mechanics of eukaryotic translation.

    Kapp LD and Lorsch JR

    Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2185, USA. lkapp@jhmi.edu

    Great advances have been made in the past three decades in understanding the molecular mechanics underlying protein synthesis in bacteria, but our understanding of the corresponding events in eukaryotic organisms is only beginning to catch up. In this review we describe the current state of our knowledge and ignorance of the molecular mechanics underlying eukaryotic translation. We discuss the mechanisms conserved across the three kingdoms of life as well as the important divergences that have taken place in the pathway.

    Annual review of biochemistry 2004;73;657-704

  • Regulated release of L13a from the 60S ribosomal subunit as a mechanism of transcript-specific translational control.

    Mazumder B, Sampath P, Seshadri V, Maitra RK, DiCorleto PE and Fox PL

    Department of Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

    Transcript-specific translational control is generally directed by binding of trans-acting proteins to structural elements in the untranslated region (UTR) of the target mRNA. Here, we elucidate a translational silencing mechanism involving regulated release of an integral ribosomal protein and subsequent binding to its target mRNA. Human ribosomal protein L13a was identified as a candidate interferon-Gamma-Activated Inhibitor of Translation (GAIT) of ceruloplasmin (Cp) mRNA by a genetic screen for Cp 3'-UTR binding proteins. In vitro activity of L13a was shown by inhibition of target mRNA translation by recombinant protein. In response to interferon-gamma in vivo, the entire cellular pool of L13a was phosphorylated and released from the 60S ribosomal subunit. Released L13a specifically bound the 3'-UTR GAIT element of Cp mRNA and silenced translation. We propose a model in which the ribosome functions not only as a protein synthesis machine, but also as a depot for regulatory proteins that modulate translation.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL29582, HL67725

    Cell 2003;115;2;187-98

  • Characterization and analysis of posttranslational modifications of the human large cytoplasmic ribosomal subunit proteins by mass spectrometry and Edman sequencing.

    Odintsova TI, Müller EC, Ivanov AV, Egorov TA, Bienert R, Vladimirov SN, Kostka S, Otto A, Wittmann-Liebold B and Karpova GG

    Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.

    The 60S ribosomal proteins were isolated from ribosomes of human placenta and separated by reversed phase HPLC. The fractions obtained were subjected to trypsin and Glu-C digestion and analyzed by mass fingerprinting (MALDI-TOF), MS/MS (ESI), and Edman sequencing. Forty-six large subunit proteins were found, 22 of which showed masses in accordance with the SwissProt database (June 2002) masses (proteins L6, L7, L9, L13, L15, L17, L18, L21, L22, L24, L26, L27, L30, L32, L34, L35, L36, L37, L37A, L38, L39, L41). Eleven (proteins L7, L10A, L11, L12, L13A, L23, L23A, L27A, L28, L29, and P0) resulted in mass changes that are consistent with N-terminal loss of methionine, acetylation, internal methylation, or hydroxylation. A loss of methionine without acetylation was found for protein L8 and L17. For nine proteins (L3, L4, L5, L7A, L10, L14, L19, L31, and L40), the molecular masses could not be determined. Proteins P1 and protein L3-like were not identified by the methods applied.

    Journal of protein chemistry 2003;22;3;249-58

  • Directed proteomic analysis of the human nucleolus.

    Andersen JS, Lyon CE, Fox AH, Leung AK, Lam YW, Steen H, Mann M and Lamond AI

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense M, Denmark.

    Background: The nucleolus is a subnuclear organelle containing the ribosomal RNA gene clusters and ribosome biogenesis factors. Recent studies suggest it may also have roles in RNA transport, RNA modification, and cell cycle regulation. Despite over 150 years of research into nucleoli, many aspects of their structure and function remain uncharacterized.

    Results: We report a proteomic analysis of human nucleoli. Using a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) and sequence database searches, including online analysis of the draft human genome sequence, 271 proteins were identified. Over 30% of the nucleolar proteins were encoded by novel or uncharacterized genes, while the known proteins included several unexpected factors with no previously known nucleolar functions. MS analysis of nucleoli isolated from HeLa cells in which transcription had been inhibited showed that a subset of proteins was enriched. These data highlight the dynamic nature of the nucleolar proteome and show that proteins can either associate with nucleoli transiently or accumulate only under specific metabolic conditions.

    Conclusions: This extensive proteomic analysis shows that nucleoli have a surprisingly large protein complexity. The many novel factors and separate classes of proteins identified support the view that the nucleolus may perform additional functions beyond its known role in ribosome subunit biogenesis. The data also show that the protein composition of nucleoli is not static and can alter significantly in response to the metabolic state of the cell.

    Current biology : CB 2002;12;1;1-11

  • A complete map of the human ribosomal protein genes: assignment of 80 genes to the cytogenetic map and implications for human disorders.

    Uechi T, Tanaka T and Kenmochi N

    Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, 903-0215, Japan.

    Mapping of the human ribosomal protein (RP) genes has been completed, and all 80 different genes were placed on a cytogenetic map of the human genome. Because of the existence of processed pseudogenes, the localization of the RP genes was complicated, and five genes had remained to be mapped. Here we developed a novel strategy to identify sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns of the RP genes, and we localized RPL14, RPL22, RPL35, RPL36, and RPL39 within the chromosomes by radiation hybrid mapping. Unlike the case of eubacteria or archaebacteria, human RP genes are widely scattered about the genome. Together with the previous results, both sex chromosomes and 20 autosomes (all but chromosomes 7 and 21) were found to carry one or more RP genes. To explore the possible involvement of RP genes in human disorders, all 80 genes were assigned to cytogenetic bands according to a published cytogenetic BAC-STS map of the human genome. We compared the assigned positions with candidate regions for Mendelian disorders and found certain genes that might be involved in particular human disorders.

    Genomics 2001;72;3;223-30

  • The intron-containing L3 ribosomal protein gene (RPL3): sequence analysis and identification of U43 and of two novel intronic small nucleolar RNAs.

    Duga S, Asselta R, Malcovati M, Tenchini ML, Ronchi S and Simonic T

    Istituto di Fisiologia Veterinaria e Biochimica, Università di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133, Milan, Italy.

    Isolation and sequencing of bovine and human intron-containing L3 ribosomal protein genes are here reported. They exhibit very similar organisation, both comprising 10 exons and nine introns. A polymorphic locus, involving a 19-bp deletion, was found in intron 6 of the human gene. The frequency of the two alleles has been estimated in 200 haploid genomes. In bovine and human genes intron sequences are rather different, except for limited regions, located in corresponding positions, which show a surprisingly high degree of identity. All these regions contain conserved features defining the box C/D class of small nucleolar RNAs. Demonstration is given that U43 small nucleolar RNA is encoded within the first intron of both bovine and human genes. Single nucleotide sequences, encoding two novel species of small nucleolar RNAs (U82, U83a and U83b), are located in introns 3, 5 and 7. Their expression has been investigated and a possible role of these molecules in 2'-O-ribose methylation of rRNAs is discussed.

    Biochimica et biophysica acta 2000;1490;3;225-36

  • The DNA sequence of human chromosome 22.

    Dunham I, Shimizu N, Roe BA, Chissoe S, Hunt AR, Collins JE, Bruskiewich R, Beare DM, Clamp M, Smink LJ, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Babbage A, Bagguley C, Bailey J, Barlow K, Bates KN, Beasley O, Bird CP, Blakey S, Bridgeman AM, Buck D, Burgess J, Burrill WD, O'Brien KP et al.

    Sanger Centre, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK. id1@sanger.ac.uk

    Knowledge of the complete genomic DNA sequence of an organism allows a systematic approach to defining its genetic components. The genomic sequence provides access to the complete structures of all genes, including those without known function, their control elements, and, by inference, the proteins they encode, as well as all other biologically important sequences. Furthermore, the sequence is a rich and permanent source of information for the design of further biological studies of the organism and for the study of evolution through cross-species sequence comparison. The power of this approach has been amply demonstrated by the determination of the sequences of a number of microbial and model organisms. The next step is to obtain the complete sequence of the entire human genome. Here we report the sequence of the euchromatic part of human chromosome 22. The sequence obtained consists of 12 contiguous segments spanning 33.4 megabases, contains at least 545 genes and 134 pseudogenes, and provides the first view of the complex chromosomal landscapes that will be found in the rest of the genome.

    Nature 1999;402;6761;489-95

  • A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes.

    Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S, Davis E, Goodman N, Hudson TJ, Tanaka T and Page DC

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kenmochi@med.u-ryuku.ac.jp

    We mapped 75 genes that collectively encode >90% of the proteins found in human ribosomes. Because localization of ribosomal protein genes (rp genes) is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes, multiple strategies were devised to identify PCR-detectable sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns. In some cases we exploited specific, pre-existing information about the intron/exon structure of a given human rp gene or its homolog in another vertebrate. When such information was unavailable, selection of PCR primer pairs was guided by general insights gleaned from analysis of all mammalian rp genes whose intron/exon structures have been published. For many genes, PCR amplification of introns was facilitated by use of YAC pool DNAs rather than total human genomic DNA as templates. We then assigned the rp gene STSs to individual human chromosomes by typing human-rodent hybrid cell lines. The genes were placed more precisely on the physical map of the human genome by typing of radiation hybrids or screening YAC libraries. Fifty-one previously unmapped rp genes were localized, and 24 previously reported rp gene localizations were confirmed, refined, or corrected. Though functionally related and coordinately expressed, the 75 mapped genes are widely dispersed: Both sex chromosomes and at least 20 of the 22 autosomes carry one or more rp genes. Chromosome 19, known to have a high gene density, contains an unusually large number of rp genes (12). This map provides a foundation for the study of the possible roles of ribosomal protein deficiencies in chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Genome research 1998;8;5;509-23

  • A novel ribosomal protein L3-like gene (RPL3L) maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene region.

    Van Raay TJ, Connors TD, Klinger KW, Landes GM and Burn TC

    Department of Human Genetics, Genzyme Genetics, Framingham, Massachusetts 01701, USA.

    A full-length cDNA encoding a novel ribosomal protein L3 gene was isolated and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 407 amino acids long and shows 77% identity to other known mammalian ribosomal protein L3 genes, which are themselves highly conserved. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA suggests that this novel gene is single copy. While the previously identified human ribosomal protein L3 gene has ubiquitous expression in all tissues surveyed, the novel gene described herein is strongly expressed in skeletal muscle and heart tissue, with low levels of expression in the pancreas. This novel gene, RPL3L, is located in a gene-rich region near the PKD1 and TSC2 genes on chromosome 16p13.3.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK 44853

    Genomics 1996;37;2;172-6

  • Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins.

    Wool IG, Chan YL and Glück A

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

    Mammalian (rat) ribosomes have 80 proteins; the sequence of amino acids in 75 have been determined. What has been learned of the structure of the rat ribosomal proteins is reviewed with particular attention to their evolution and to amino acid sequence motifs. The latter include: clusters of basic or acidic residues; sequence repeats or shared sequences; zinc finger domains; bZIP elements; and nuclear localization signals. The occurrence and the possible significance of phosphorylated residues and of ubiquitin extensions is noted. The characteristics of the mRNAs that encode the proteins are summarized. The relationship of the rat ribosomal proteins to the proteins in ribosomes from humans, yeast, archaebacteria, and Escherichia coli is collated.

    Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire 1995;73;11-12;933-47

  • Molecular cloning and characterization of a TAR-binding nuclear factor from T cells.

    Reddy TR, Suhasini M, Rappaport J, Looney DJ, Kraus G and Wong-Staal F

    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla 92093-0665, USA.

    The TAt protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activates the expression of viral mRNA through a cis-acting element in the LTR termed TAR. TAR RNA forms a stable stem-loop structure. Mutagenesis studies indicate that the stem structure, the primary sequence of the loop, and three unpaired bases in the stem (bulge) are important for Tat activation. Using the in vitro-transcribed TAR RNA as a probe, we have cloned a gene (TARBP-b) that encodes a TAR-binding protein from a cDNA expression library derived from Hut-78 cells. Expression of the 1.4-kb TARBP-b mRNA was observed in all mammalian cell lines tested. TARBP-b binds specifically to the bulge region of TAR RNA and trans-activates the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in the presence of ptat and prev expression plasmids. These results suggest that TARBP-b contributes to tat-mediated trans-activation.

    Funded by: NIAID NIH HHS: AI 31378

    AIDS research and human retroviruses 1995;11;6;663-9

  • The addition of 5'-coding information to a 3'-directed cDNA library improves analysis of gene expression.

    Matoba R, Okubo K, Hori N, Fukushima A and Matsubara K

    Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Osaka University, Japan.

    Large-scale sequencing of a 3'-cDNA library permits one to analyse gene expression profiles in various tissues. However, many such sequences lack enough information about the encoded proteins. To overcome this problem, we tested a new library, consisting of a 3'-directed cDNA sequence fused to a to a 5' sequence of about 300 bp. Such 'joint molecules' of about 600 bp were amplified by PCR and directly sequenced. About 40% of these joint molecules included the 5' and 3' terminal portions of the mRNA, and most of the remaining clones contained the middle portion and 3' end of the mRNA. The upstream sequences contained sufficient information with which to search for similarity, ORFs, motifs and hydropathy, thus allowing the mRNAs to be categorized and their functions predicted. The rapid categorization of the cDNAs will help to sort those clones that merit further analysis.

    Gene 1994;146;2;199-207

  • Sequence identification of 2,375 human brain genes.

    Adams MD, Dubnick M, Kerlavage AR, Moreno R, Kelley JM, Utterback TR, Nagle JW, Fields C and Venter JC

    Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.

    We recently described a new approach for the rapid characterization of expressed genes by partial DNA sequencing to generate 'expressed sequence tags'. From a set of 600 human brain complementary DNA clones, 348 were informative nuclear-encoded messenger RNAs. We have now partially sequenced 2,672 new, independent cDNA clones isolated from four human brain cDNA libraries to generate 2,375 expressed sequence tags to nuclear-encoded genes. These sequences, together with 348 brain expressed sequence tags from our previous study, comprise more than 2,500 new human genes and 870,769 base pairs of DNA sequence. These data represent an approximate doubling of the number of human genes identified by DNA sequencing and may represent as many as 5% of the genes in the human genome.

    Nature 1992;355;6361;632-4

  • Cloning and characterization of a human ribosomal protein gene with enhanced expression in fetal and neoplastic cells.

    Ou JH, Yen TS, Wang YF, Kam WK and Rutter WJ

    Hormone Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is strongly associated with hepatitis B virus carrier patients who usually have HBV sequences integrated in the chromosomal DNA of liver cells. To assess the possible effects of HBV regulatory sequences (e.g., the enhancer) on expression of neighboring host genes we have screened for cellular genes that are both overexpressed and adjacent to integrated HBV sequences in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The cloned cDNA for one such gene encodes a protein similar to the E. coli L-3 ribosomal protein which is thought to play a role in mRNA binding to the ribosome. The protein encoded by the cDNA localizes to the nucleolus and is also found in ribosomes; possibly it is the mammalian homologue of L-3 (MRL3). The expression of MRL3 is higher in colon carcinoma and lymphoma cell lines than in normal liver, placenta and diploid fibroblasts, and is also higher in fetal than in adult liver. Therefore, MRL3 overexpression seems to be a property of rapidly dividing cells and is not directly linked to oncogenesis.

    Funded by: NIAID NIH HHS: AI19744

    Nucleic acids research 1987;15;21;8919-34

Gene lists (4)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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