G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002349
Gene symbol
DIP2B (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
DIP2 disco-interacting protein 2 homolog B (Drosophila)
Orthologue
G00001100 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000066084 (Ensembl human gene)
57609 (Entrez Gene)
1280 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DIP2B (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:29284 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q96IB4 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • KIAA1463

Literature (6)

Pubmed - other

  • CGG-repeat expansion in the DIP2B gene is associated with the fragile site FRA12A on chromosome 12q13.1.

    Winnepenninckx B, Debacker K, Ramsay J, Smeets D, Smits A, FitzPatrick DR and Kooy RF

    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.

    A high level of cytogenetic expression of the rare folate-sensitive fragile site FRA12A is significantly associated with mental retardation. Here, we identify an elongated polymorphic CGG repeat as the molecular basis of FRA12A. This repeat is in the 5' untranslated region of the gene DIP2B, which encodes a protein with a DMAP1-binding domain, which suggests a role in DNA methylation machinery. DIP2B mRNA levels were halved in two subjects with FRA12A with mental retardation in whom the repeat expansion was methylated. In two individuals without mental retardation but with an expanded and methylated repeat, DIP2B expression was reduced to approximately two-thirds of the values observed in controls. Interestingly, a carrier of an unmethylated CGG-repeat expansion showed increased levels of DIP2B mRNA, which suggests that the repeat elongation increases gene expression, as previously described for the fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome. These data suggest that deficiency of DIP2B, a brain-expressed gene, may mediate the neurocognitive problems associated with FRA12A.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: MC_U127561093

    American journal of human genetics 2007;80;2;221-31

  • Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.

    Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, Elias JE, Villén J, Li J, Cohn MA, Cantley LC and Gygi SP

    Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

    Determining the site of a regulatory phosphorylation event is often essential for elucidating specific kinase-substrate relationships, providing a handle for understanding essential signaling pathways and ultimately allowing insights into numerous disease pathologies. Despite intense research efforts to elucidate mechanisms of protein phosphorylation regulation, efficient, large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites remains an unsolved problem. In this report we describe an application of existing technology for the isolation and identification of phosphorylation sites. By using a strategy based on strong cation exchange chromatography, phosphopeptides were enriched from the nuclear fraction of HeLa cell lysate. From 967 proteins, 2,002 phosphorylation sites were determined by tandem MS. This unprecedented large collection of sites permitted a detailed accounting of known and unknown kinase motifs and substrates.

    Funded by: NHGRI NIH HHS: HG00041, K22 HG000041, T32 HG000041; NIGMS NIH HHS: GM67945, GMS6203, R01 GM056203, R01 GM067945

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2004;101;33;12130-5

  • Bridging expressed sequence alignments through targeted cDNA sequencing.

    Xie H, Diber A, Pollock S, Nemzer S, Safer H, Meloon B, Olson A, Hwang JJ, Endress GA, Savitsky K and Gill-More R

    Compugen, Inc., 7 Center Drive, Suite 9, Jamesburg, NJ 08831, USA. han@cgen.com

    One of the major challenges in genome research is the identification of the complete set of genes in a genome. Alignments of expressed sequences (RNA and EST) with genomic sequences have been used to characterize genes. However, the number of alignments far exceeds the likely number of genes in a genome, suggesting that, for many genes, two or more alignments can be joined through overlapping sequences to yield accurate gene structures. High-throughput EST sequencing becomes less efficient in closing those alignment gaps due to its nonselective nature. We sought to bridge these alignments through a novel approach: targeted cDNA sequencing. Human expressed sequences from GenBank version 124 were aligned with the genomic sequence from NCBI build 24 using LEADS, Compugen's EST and RNA clustering and assembly software system. Nine hundred forty-eight pairs of alignments were selected based on EST clone information and/or their homology to the same known proteins. Reverse transcriptase PCR and sequencing yielded sequences for 363 of those pairs. These sequences helped characterize over 60 novel or otherwise incomplete genes in the recent UniGene build 153, which included over 1 million additional ESTs. These results indicate that this integrated and targeted strategy, combining computational prediction and experimental cDNA sequencing, can efficiently generate the overlapping sequences and enable the full characterization of genomes. Additional information about the contig pairs, the resultant overlapping sequences, tissue sources, and tissue profiles are available in a supplemental file.

    Genomics 2004;83;4;572-6

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XVII. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Kikuno R, Ishikawa K, Hirosawa M and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan. nagase@kazusa.or.jp

    To provide information regarding the coding sequences of unidentified human genes, we have conducted a sequencing project of human cDNAs which encode large proteins. We herein present the entire sequences of 100 cDNA clones of unknown human genes, named KIAA1444 to KIAA1543, from two sets of size-fractionated human adult and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The average sizes of the inserts and corresponding open reading frames of cDNA clones analyzed here were 4.4 kb and 2.6 kb (856 amino acid residues), respectively. Database searches of the predicted amino acid sequences classified 53 predicted gene products into the following five functional categories: cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, cell structure/motility, protein management and metabolism. It was also revealed that homologues for 32 KIAA gene products were detected in the databases, which were similar in sequence through almost their entire regions. Additionally, the chromosomal loci of the genes were determined by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their chromosomal loci were already assigned in the public databases. The expression levels of the genes were monitored in spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver, as well as in 10 human tissues and 8 brain regions, by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 2000;7;2;143-50

Gene lists (5)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000059 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-CONSENSUS Human cortex PSD consensus 748
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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