G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002301
Gene symbol
KIAA1217 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
KIAA1217
Orthologue
G00001052 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000120549 (Ensembl human gene)
56243 (Entrez Gene)
1279 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
KIAA1217 (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:25428 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q5T5P2 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • DKFZP761L0424
  • SKT

Literature (5)

Pubmed - other

  • Common genetic variation and performance on standardized cognitive tests.

    Cirulli ET, Kasperaviciūte D, Attix DK, Need AC, Ge D, Gibson G and Goldstein DB

    Center for Human Genome Variation, Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

    One surprising feature of the recently completed waves of genome-wide association studies is the limited impact of common genetic variation in individually detectable polymorphisms on many human traits. This has been particularly pronounced for studies on psychiatric conditions, which have failed to produce clear, replicable associations for common variants. One popular explanation for these negative findings is that many of these traits may be genetically heterogeneous, leading to the idea that relevant endophenotypes may be more genetically tractable. Aspects of cognition may be the most important endophenotypes for psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, leading many researchers to pursue large-scale studies on the genetic contributors of cognitive performance in the normal population as a surrogate for aspects of liability to disease. Here, we perform a genome-wide association study with two tests of executive function, Digit Symbol and Stroop Color-Word, in 1086 healthy volunteers and with an expanded cognitive battery in 514 of these volunteers. We show that, consistent with published studies of the psychiatric conditions themselves, no single common variant has a large effect (explaining >4-8% of the population variation) on the performance of healthy individuals on standardized cognitive tests. Given that these are important endophenotypes, our work is consistent with the idea that identifying rare genetic causes of psychiatric conditions may be more important for future research than identifying genetically homogenous endophenotypes.

    European journal of human genetics : EJHG 2010;18;7;815-20

  • Association of the tag SNPs in the human SKT gene (KIAA1217) with lumbar disc herniation.

    Karasugi T, Semba K, Hirose Y, Kelempisioti A, Nakajima M, Miyake A, Furuichi T, Kawaguchi Y, Mikami Y, Chiba K, Kamata M, Ozaki K, Takahashi A, Mäkelä P, Karppinen J, Kimura T, Kubo T, Toyama Y, Yamamura K, Männikkö M, Mizuta H and Ikegawa S

    Laboratory for Bone and Joint Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Tokyo, Japan.

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is one of the most common musculo-skeletal diseases. Recent studies have indicated that LDH has strong genetic determinants, and several susceptibility genes have been reported to associate with LDH; however, its etiology and pathogenesis still remain unclear. KIAA1217 (alias SKT, the human homolog of murine Skt [Sickle tail]) is a good candidate for an LDH susceptibility gene because SKT is specifically expressed in nucleus pulposa of intervertebral discs (IVDs) in humans and mice, and Skt(Gt) mice, which are established through a large-scale gene-trap mutagenesis, exhibit progressive, postnatal onset abnormality of the IVDs. Here, we report the association of SKT with LDH. Using tag SNPs, we examined the association in two independent Japanese case-control populations and found a significant association with SKT rs16924573 in the allele frequency model (p = 0.0015). The association was replicated in a Finnish case-control population (p = 0.026). The combined p value of the two population by meta-analysis is 0.00040 (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.58). Our data indicate that SKT is involved in the etiology of LDH.

    Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research 2009;24;9;1537-43

  • Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network.

    Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, Hirozane-Kishikawa T, Dricot A, Li N, Berriz GF, Gibbons FD, Dreze M, Ayivi-Guedehoussou N, Klitgord N, Simon C, Boxem M, Milstein S, Rosenberg J, Goldberg DS, Zhang LV, Wong SL, Franklin G, Li S, Albala JS, Lim J, Fraughton C, Llamosas E, Cevik S, Bex C, Lamesch P, Sikorski RS, Vandenhaute J, Zoghbi HY, Smolyar A, Bosak S, Sequerra R, Doucette-Stamm L, Cusick ME, Hill DE, Roth FP and Vidal M

    Center for Cancer Systems Biology and Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    Systematic mapping of protein-protein interactions, or 'interactome' mapping, was initiated in model organisms, starting with defined biological processes and then expanding to the scale of the proteome. Although far from complete, such maps have revealed global topological and dynamic features of interactome networks that relate to known biological properties, suggesting that a human interactome map will provide insight into development and disease mechanisms at a systems level. Here we describe an initial version of a proteome-scale map of human binary protein-protein interactions. Using a stringent, high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system, we tested pairwise interactions among the products of approximately 8,100 currently available Gateway-cloned open reading frames and detected approximately 2,800 interactions. This data set, called CCSB-HI1, has a verification rate of approximately 78% as revealed by an independent co-affinity purification assay, and correlates significantly with other biological attributes. The CCSB-HI1 data set increases by approximately 70% the set of available binary interactions within the tested space and reveals more than 300 new connections to over 100 disease-associated proteins. This work represents an important step towards a systematic and comprehensive human interactome project.

    Funded by: NCI NIH HHS: R33 CA132073; NHGRI NIH HHS: P50 HG004233, R01 HG001715, RC4 HG006066, U01 HG001715; NHLBI NIH HHS: U01 HL098166

    Nature 2005;437;7062;1173-8

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. XV. The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Kikuno R, Hirosawa M, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Kisarazu, Chiba, Japan. nagase@kazusa.or.jp

    In order to obtain information on the coding sequences of unidentified human genes, we newly determined the sequences of 100 cDNA clones of unknown human genes, which we named KIAA1193 to KIAA1292, from two sets of size-fractionated human adult and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The results of our particular strategy to select cDNA clones which have the potentiality of coding for large proteins in vitro revealed that the average sizes of the inserts and the corresponding open reading frames reached 5.2 kb and 2.8 kb (933 amino acid residues), respectively. By the computational analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences against the OWL and Pfam databases, 58 predicted gene products were classified into the following five functional categories: cell signaling/communication, cell structure/motility, nucleic acid management, protein management and metabolism. It was also found that 30 gene products had homologues in the public databases which were similar in sequence throughout almost their entire regions to the newly identified genes. The chromosomal loci of the genes were assigned by using human-rodent hybrid panels unless their mapping data were already available in the public databases. The expression profiles of the genes were studied in 10 human tissues, 8 brain regions, spinal cord, fetal brain and fetal liver by reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction, products of which were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1999;6;5;337-45

Gene lists (2)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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