G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00002213
Gene symbol
RPL10A (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ribosomal protein L10a
Orthologue
G00000964 (Mus musculus)

Databases (6)

Gene
ENSG00000198755 (Ensembl human gene)
4736 (Entrez Gene)
915 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
RPL10A (GeneCards)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:10299 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
P62906 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • Csa-19
  • L10A

Literature (18)

Pubmed - other

  • The metastasis efficiency modifier ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) is a chromatin-associated factor.

    Crawford NP, Yang H, Mattaini KR and Hunter KW

    Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

    There is accumulating evidence for a role of germ line variation in breast cancer metastasis. We have recently identified a novel metastasis susceptibility gene, Rrp1b (ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B). Overexpression of Rrp1b in a mouse mammary tumor cell line induces a gene expression signature that predicts survival in breast cancer. Here we extend the analysis of RRP1B function by demonstrating that the Rrp1b activation gene expression signature accurately predicted the outcome in three of four publicly available breast carcinoma gene expression data sets. In addition, we provide insights into the mechanism of RRP1B. Tandem affinity purification demonstrated that RRP1B physically interacts with many nucleosome binding factors, including histone H1X, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, TRIM28 (tripartite motif-containing 28), and CSDA (cold shock domain protein A). Co-immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation confirmed these interactions and also interactions with heterochromatin protein-1alpha and acetyl-histone H4 lysine 5. Finally, we investigated the effects of ectopic expression of an RRP1B allelic variant previously associated with improved survival in breast cancer. Gene expression analyses demonstrate that, compared with ectopic expression of wild type RRP1B in HeLa cells, the variant RRP1B differentially modulates various transcription factors controlled by TRIM28 and CSDA. These data suggest that RRP1B, a tumor progression and metastasis susceptibility candidate gene, is potentially a dynamic modulator of transcription and chromatin structure.

    Funded by: Intramural NIH HHS

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2009;284;42;28660-73

  • Shugoshin collaborates with protein phosphatase 2A to protect cohesin.

    Kitajima TS, Sakuno T, Ishiguro K, Iemura S, Natsume T, Kawashima SA and Watanabe Y

    Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, University of Tokyo, Japan.

    Sister chromatid cohesion, mediated by a complex called cohesin, is crucial--particularly at centromeres--for proper chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. In animal mitotic cells, phosphorylation of cohesin promotes its dissociation from chromosomes, but centromeric cohesin is protected by shugoshin until kinetochores are properly captured by the spindle microtubules. However, the mechanism of shugoshin-dependent protection of cohesin is unknown. Here we find a specific subtype of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associating with human shugoshin. PP2A colocalizes with shugoshin at centromeres and is required for centromeric protection. Purified shugoshin complex has an ability to reverse the phosphorylation of cohesin in vitro, suggesting that dephosphorylation of cohesin is the mechanism of protection at centromeres. Meiotic shugoshin of fission yeast also associates with PP2A, with both proteins collaboratively protecting Rec8-containing cohesin at centromeres. Thus, we have revealed a conserved mechanism of centromeric protection of eukaryotic chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis.

    Nature 2006;441;7089;46-52

  • Nucleolar proteome dynamics.

    Andersen JS, Lam YW, Leung AK, Ong SE, Lyon CE, Lamond AI and Mann M

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.

    The nucleolus is a key organelle that coordinates the synthesis and assembly of ribosomal subunits and forms in the nucleus around the repeated ribosomal gene clusters. Because the production of ribosomes is a major metabolic activity, the function of the nucleolus is tightly linked to cell growth and proliferation, and recent data suggest that the nucleolus also plays an important role in cell-cycle regulation, senescence and stress responses. Here, using mass-spectrometry-based organellar proteomics and stable isotope labelling, we perform a quantitative analysis of the proteome of human nucleoli. In vivo fluorescent imaging techniques are directly compared to endogenous protein changes measured by proteomics. We characterize the flux of 489 endogenous nucleolar proteins in response to three different metabolic inhibitors that each affect nucleolar morphology. Proteins that are stably associated, such as RNA polymerase I subunits and small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle complexes, exit from or accumulate in the nucleolus with similar kinetics, whereas protein components of the large and small ribosomal subunits leave the nucleolus with markedly different kinetics. The data establish a quantitative proteomic approach for the temporal characterization of protein flux through cellular organelles and demonstrate that the nucleolar proteome changes significantly over time in response to changes in cellular growth conditions.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust: 073980

    Nature 2005;433;7021;77-83

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Sequence comparison of human and mouse genes reveals a homologous block structure in the promoter regions.

    Suzuki Y, Yamashita R, Shirota M, Sakakibara Y, Chiba J, Mizushima-Sugano J, Nakai K and Sugano S

    Human Genome Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan. ysuzuki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Comparative sequence analysis was carried out for the regions adjacent to experimentally validated transcriptional start sites (TSSs), using 3324 pairs of human and mouse genes. We aligned the upstream putative promoter sequences over the 1-kb proximal regions and found that the sequence conservation could not be further extended at, on average, 510 bp upstream positions of the TSSs. This discontinuous manner of the sequence conservation revealed a "block" structure in about one-third of the putative promoter regions. Consistently, we also observed that G+C content and CpG frequency were significantly different inside and outside the blocks. Within the blocks, the sequence identity was uniformly 65% regardless of their length. About 90% of the previously characterized transcription factor binding sites were located within those blocks. In 46% of the blocks, the 5' ends were bounded by interspersed repetitive elements, some of which may have nucleated the genomic rearrangements. The length of the blocks was shortest in the promoters of genes encoding transcription factors and of genes whose expression patterns are brain specific, which suggests that the evolutional diversifications in the transcriptional modulations should be the most marked in these populations of genes.

    Genome research 2004;14;9;1711-8

  • A physical and functional map of the human TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway.

    Bouwmeester T, Bauch A, Ruffner H, Angrand PO, Bergamini G, Croughton K, Cruciat C, Eberhard D, Gagneur J, Ghidelli S, Hopf C, Huhse B, Mangano R, Michon AM, Schirle M, Schlegl J, Schwab M, Stein MA, Bauer A, Casari G, Drewes G, Gavin AC, Jackson DB, Joberty G, Neubauer G, Rick J, Kuster B and Superti-Furga G

    Cellzome AG, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. tewis.bouwmeester@cellzome.com

    Signal transduction pathways are modular composites of functionally interdependent sets of proteins that act in a coordinated fashion to transform environmental information into a phenotypic response. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha triggers a signalling cascade, converging on the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B, which forms the basis for numerous physiological and pathological processes. Here we report the mapping of a protein interaction network around 32 known and candidate TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway components by using an integrated approach comprising tandem affinity purification, liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, network analysis and directed functional perturbation studies using RNA interference. We identified 221 molecular associations and 80 previously unknown interactors, including 10 new functional modulators of the pathway. This systems approach provides significant insight into the logic of the TNF-alpha/NF-kappa B pathway and is generally applicable to other pathways relevant to human disease.

    Nature cell biology 2004;6;2;97-105

  • The molecular mechanics of eukaryotic translation.

    Kapp LD and Lorsch JR

    Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205-2185, USA. lkapp@jhmi.edu

    Great advances have been made in the past three decades in understanding the molecular mechanics underlying protein synthesis in bacteria, but our understanding of the corresponding events in eukaryotic organisms is only beginning to catch up. In this review we describe the current state of our knowledge and ignorance of the molecular mechanics underlying eukaryotic translation. We discuss the mechanisms conserved across the three kingdoms of life as well as the important divergences that have taken place in the pathway.

    Annual review of biochemistry 2004;73;657-704

  • The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 6.

    Mungall AJ, Palmer SA, Sims SK, Edwards CA, Ashurst JL, Wilming L, Jones MC, Horton R, Hunt SE, Scott CE, Gilbert JG, Clamp ME, Bethel G, Milne S, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Ambrose KD, Andrews TD, Ashwell RI, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Banerjee R, Barker DJ, Barlow KF, Bates K, Beare DM, Beasley H, Beasley O, Bird CP, Blakey S, Bray-Allen S, Brook J, Brown AJ, Brown JY, Burford DC, Burrill W, Burton J, Carder C, Carter NP, Chapman JC, Clark SY, Clark G, Clee CM, Clegg S, Cobley V, Collier RE, Collins JE, Colman LK, Corby NR, Coville GJ, Culley KM, Dhami P, Davies J, Dunn M, Earthrowl ME, Ellington AE, Evans KA, Faulkner L, Francis MD, Frankish A, Frankland J, French L, Garner P, Garnett J, Ghori MJ, Gilby LM, Gillson CJ, Glithero RJ, Grafham DV, Grant M, Gribble S, Griffiths C, Griffiths M, Hall R, Halls KS, Hammond S, Harley JL, Hart EA, Heath PD, Heathcott R, Holmes SJ, Howden PJ, Howe KL, Howell GR, Huckle E, Humphray SJ, Humphries MD, Hunt AR, Johnson CM, Joy AA, Kay M, Keenan SJ, Kimberley AM, King A, Laird GK, Langford C, Lawlor S, Leongamornlert DA, Leversha M, Lloyd CR, Lloyd DM, Loveland JE, Lovell J, Martin S, Mashreghi-Mohammadi M, Maslen GL, Matthews L, McCann OT, McLaren SJ, McLay K, McMurray A, Moore MJ, Mullikin JC, Niblett D, Nickerson T, Novik KL, Oliver K, Overton-Larty EK, Parker A, Patel R, Pearce AV, Peck AI, Phillimore B, Phillips S, Plumb RW, Porter KM, Ramsey Y, Ranby SA, Rice CM, Ross MT, Searle SM, Sehra HK, Sheridan E, Skuce CD, Smith S, Smith M, Spraggon L, Squares SL, Steward CA, Sycamore N, Tamlyn-Hall G, Tester J, Theaker AJ, Thomas DW, Thorpe A, Tracey A, Tromans A, Tubby B, Wall M, Wallis JM, West AP, White SS, Whitehead SL, Whittaker H, Wild A, Willey DJ, Wilmer TE, Wood JM, Wray PW, Wyatt JC, Young L, Younger RM, Bentley DR, Coulson A, Durbin R, Hubbard T, Sulston JE, Dunham I, Rogers J and Beck S

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ajm@sanger.ac.uk

    Chromosome 6 is a metacentric chromosome that constitutes about 6% of the human genome. The finished sequence comprises 166,880,988 base pairs, representing the largest chromosome sequenced so far. The entire sequence has been subjected to high-quality manual annotation, resulting in the evidence-supported identification of 1,557 genes and 633 pseudogenes. Here we report that at least 96% of the protein-coding genes have been identified, as assessed by multi-species comparative sequence analysis, and provide evidence for the presence of further, otherwise unsupported exons/genes. Among these are genes directly implicated in cancer, schizophrenia, autoimmunity and many other diseases. Chromosome 6 harbours the largest transfer RNA gene cluster in the genome; we show that this cluster co-localizes with a region of high transcriptional activity. Within the essential immune loci of the major histocompatibility complex, we find HLA-B to be the most polymorphic gene on chromosome 6 and in the human genome.

    Nature 2003;425;6960;805-11

  • Regulated release of L13a from the 60S ribosomal subunit as a mechanism of transcript-specific translational control.

    Mazumder B, Sampath P, Seshadri V, Maitra RK, DiCorleto PE and Fox PL

    Department of Cell Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

    Transcript-specific translational control is generally directed by binding of trans-acting proteins to structural elements in the untranslated region (UTR) of the target mRNA. Here, we elucidate a translational silencing mechanism involving regulated release of an integral ribosomal protein and subsequent binding to its target mRNA. Human ribosomal protein L13a was identified as a candidate interferon-Gamma-Activated Inhibitor of Translation (GAIT) of ceruloplasmin (Cp) mRNA by a genetic screen for Cp 3'-UTR binding proteins. In vitro activity of L13a was shown by inhibition of target mRNA translation by recombinant protein. In response to interferon-gamma in vivo, the entire cellular pool of L13a was phosphorylated and released from the 60S ribosomal subunit. Released L13a specifically bound the 3'-UTR GAIT element of Cp mRNA and silenced translation. We propose a model in which the ribosome functions not only as a protein synthesis machine, but also as a depot for regulatory proteins that modulate translation.

    Funded by: NHLBI NIH HHS: HL29582, HL67725

    Cell 2003;115;2;187-98

  • Characterization and analysis of posttranslational modifications of the human large cytoplasmic ribosomal subunit proteins by mass spectrometry and Edman sequencing.

    Odintsova TI, Müller EC, Ivanov AV, Egorov TA, Bienert R, Vladimirov SN, Kostka S, Otto A, Wittmann-Liebold B and Karpova GG

    Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russian Federation.

    The 60S ribosomal proteins were isolated from ribosomes of human placenta and separated by reversed phase HPLC. The fractions obtained were subjected to trypsin and Glu-C digestion and analyzed by mass fingerprinting (MALDI-TOF), MS/MS (ESI), and Edman sequencing. Forty-six large subunit proteins were found, 22 of which showed masses in accordance with the SwissProt database (June 2002) masses (proteins L6, L7, L9, L13, L15, L17, L18, L21, L22, L24, L26, L27, L30, L32, L34, L35, L36, L37, L37A, L38, L39, L41). Eleven (proteins L7, L10A, L11, L12, L13A, L23, L23A, L27A, L28, L29, and P0) resulted in mass changes that are consistent with N-terminal loss of methionine, acetylation, internal methylation, or hydroxylation. A loss of methionine without acetylation was found for protein L8 and L17. For nine proteins (L3, L4, L5, L7A, L10, L14, L19, L31, and L40), the molecular masses could not be determined. Proteins P1 and protein L3-like were not identified by the methods applied.

    Journal of protein chemistry 2003;22;3;249-58

  • Identification of ribosomal proteins S2 and L10a as tumor antigens recognized by HLA-A26-restricted CTL.

    Koga M, Shichijo S, Yamada A, Ashihara J, Sawamizu H, Kusukawa J and Itoh K

    Department of Immunology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan.

    Recent identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-directed peptides binding to the HLA-A2 and -A24 alleles has opened the door to peptide-based cancer immunotherapies. However, subsequent studies have succeeded in identifying no more than a few CTL-directed peptides that bind to alleles other than HLA-A2 and -A24, thus hampering development of immunotherapies directed at other alleles. We have shown in this study that two genes coding for ribosomal proteins (S2 and L10a) encoded tumor antigens recognized by HLA-A26-restricted CTLs. The S2 mRNA was expressed in all of the cancer cells and non-malignant cell lines tested, but was not expressed in normal tissues except for the testis, muscle, and peripheral mononuclear leukocyte cell (PBMC). In contrast, the L10a mRNA was expressed in all of these cancer and non-malignant cell lines, and also normal tissues, although the expression levels in normal tissues were mostly low. One S2-derived peptide and two L10a-derived peptides had the ability to induce HLA-A26-restricted and peptide-specific CTLs reactive to tumor cells in PBMCs of cancer patients, respectively. These ribosomal protein-derived peptides, and particularly the S2-derived peptide, could be suitable for use in peptide-based immunotherapy for HLA-A26+ cancer patients.

    Tissue antigens 2003;61;2;136-45

  • Directed proteomic analysis of the human nucleolus.

    Andersen JS, Lyon CE, Fox AH, Leung AK, Lam YW, Steen H, Mann M and Lamond AI

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense M, Denmark.

    Background: The nucleolus is a subnuclear organelle containing the ribosomal RNA gene clusters and ribosome biogenesis factors. Recent studies suggest it may also have roles in RNA transport, RNA modification, and cell cycle regulation. Despite over 150 years of research into nucleoli, many aspects of their structure and function remain uncharacterized.

    Results: We report a proteomic analysis of human nucleoli. Using a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) and sequence database searches, including online analysis of the draft human genome sequence, 271 proteins were identified. Over 30% of the nucleolar proteins were encoded by novel or uncharacterized genes, while the known proteins included several unexpected factors with no previously known nucleolar functions. MS analysis of nucleoli isolated from HeLa cells in which transcription had been inhibited showed that a subset of proteins was enriched. These data highlight the dynamic nature of the nucleolar proteome and show that proteins can either associate with nucleoli transiently or accumulate only under specific metabolic conditions.

    Conclusions: This extensive proteomic analysis shows that nucleoli have a surprisingly large protein complexity. The many novel factors and separate classes of proteins identified support the view that the nucleolus may perform additional functions beyond its known role in ribosome subunit biogenesis. The data also show that the protein composition of nucleoli is not static and can alter significantly in response to the metabolic state of the cell.

    Current biology : CB 2002;12;1;1-11

  • Physical map of human 6p21.2-6p21.3: region flanking the centromeric end of the major histocompatibility complex.

    Tripodis N, Mason R, Humphray SJ, Davies AF, Herberg JA, Trowsdale J, Nizetic D, Senger G and Ragoussis J

    Division of Medical and Molecular Genetics, United Medical and Dental School of Guy's and St. Thomas', Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT, UK.

    We have physically mapped and cloned a 2.5-Mb chromosomal segment flanking the centromeric end of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We characterized in detail 27 YACs, 144 cosmids, 51 PACs, and 5 BACs, which will facilitate the complete genomic sequencing of this region of chromosome 6. The contig contains the genes encoding CSBP, p21, HSU09564 serine kinase, ZNF76, TCP-11, RPS10, HMGI(Y), BAK, and the human homolog of Tctex-7 (HSET). The GLO1 gene was mapped further centromeric in the 6p21.2-6p21.1 region toward TCTE-1. The gene order of the GLO1-HMGI(Y) segment in respect to the centromere is similar to the gene order in the mouse t-chromosome distal inversion, indicating that there is conservation in gene content but not gene order between humans and mice in this region. The close linkage of the BAK and CSBP genes to the MHC is of interest because of their possible involvement in autoimmune disease.

    Genome research 1998;8;6;631-43

  • A map of 75 human ribosomal protein genes.

    Kenmochi N, Kawaguchi T, Rozen S, Davis E, Goodman N, Hudson TJ, Tanaka T and Page DC

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Whitehead Institute and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. kenmochi@med.u-ryuku.ac.jp

    We mapped 75 genes that collectively encode >90% of the proteins found in human ribosomes. Because localization of ribosomal protein genes (rp genes) is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes, multiple strategies were devised to identify PCR-detectable sequence-tagged sites (STSs) at introns. In some cases we exploited specific, pre-existing information about the intron/exon structure of a given human rp gene or its homolog in another vertebrate. When such information was unavailable, selection of PCR primer pairs was guided by general insights gleaned from analysis of all mammalian rp genes whose intron/exon structures have been published. For many genes, PCR amplification of introns was facilitated by use of YAC pool DNAs rather than total human genomic DNA as templates. We then assigned the rp gene STSs to individual human chromosomes by typing human-rodent hybrid cell lines. The genes were placed more precisely on the physical map of the human genome by typing of radiation hybrids or screening YAC libraries. Fifty-one previously unmapped rp genes were localized, and 24 previously reported rp gene localizations were confirmed, refined, or corrected. Though functionally related and coordinately expressed, the 75 mapped genes are widely dispersed: Both sex chromosomes and at least 20 of the 22 autosomes carry one or more rp genes. Chromosome 19, known to have a high gene density, contains an unusually large number of rp genes (12). This map provides a foundation for the study of the possible roles of ribosomal protein deficiencies in chromosomal and Mendelian disorders.

    Genome research 1998;8;5;509-23

  • The primary structure of rat ribosomal protein L10a.

    Olvera J and Wool IG

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

    The amino acid sequence of the rat 60S ribosomal subunit protein L1Oa was deduced from the sequence of nucleotides in a recombinant cDNA. Ribosomal protein L10a has 217 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 24,815. Hybridization of the cDNA to digests of nuclear DNA suggests that there are 7 to 1O copies of the L10a gene. The mRNA for the protein is about 760 nucleotides in length. Rat L1Oa is related to ribosomal proteins from other eukaryotes and from archaebacteria.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM21769

    Biochemical and biophysical research communications 1996;220;3;954-7

  • Structure and evolution of mammalian ribosomal proteins.

    Wool IG, Chan YL and Glück A

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

    Mammalian (rat) ribosomes have 80 proteins; the sequence of amino acids in 75 have been determined. What has been learned of the structure of the rat ribosomal proteins is reviewed with particular attention to their evolution and to amino acid sequence motifs. The latter include: clusters of basic or acidic residues; sequence repeats or shared sequences; zinc finger domains; bZIP elements; and nuclear localization signals. The occurrence and the possible significance of phosphorylated residues and of ubiquitin extensions is noted. The characteristics of the mRNAs that encode the proteins are summarized. The relationship of the rat ribosomal proteins to the proteins in ribosomes from humans, yeast, archaebacteria, and Escherichia coli is collated.

    Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire 1995;73;11-12;933-47

  • Identification of genes downregulated in the thymus by cyclosporin-A: preliminary characterization of clone CSA-19.

    Fisicaro N, Katerelos M, Williams J, Power D, D'Apice A and Pearse M

    Department of Clinical Immunology, St Vincent's Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.

    Using a novel subtractive hybridization approach, we have identified a set of cDNA clones whose expression is downregulated in the thymus by cyclosporin-A (CsA). A number of regulated genes were identified, but the major focus of this report is the clone termed CsA-19. In the adult mouse, CsA-19 is expressed at high levels in lymphoid organs, particularly in secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node and spleen. CsA-19 expression was also found to be regulated in the brain and liver during mouse development. The full length sequences of the murine and human CsA-19 cDNAs have been determined. Both are 700 nucleotides in length and encode a predicted product of 217 amino acids. Comparison of the full length cDNA sequences of murine and human CsA-19 reveal that they are greater than 91% conserved. At the predicted amino acid level the homology is even greater, with only two amino acid differences in 217 residues (99% identity). The high degree of homology between murine and human CsA-19 indicates that has there been strong evolutionary pressure to conserve the amino acid sequence of CsA-19, and suggests that CsA-19 may play a critical role both during embryogenesis and in mature lymphoid cells.

    Molecular immunology 1995;32;8;565-72

  • Purification of CpG islands using a methylated DNA binding column.

    Cross SH, Charlton JA, Nan X and Bird AP

    Institute of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Edinburgh, UK.

    CpG islands are short stretches of DNA containing a high density of non-methylated CpG dinucleotides, predominantly associated with coding regions. We have constructed an affinity matrix that contains the methyl-CpG binding domain from the rat chromosomal protein MeCP2, attached to a solid support. A column containing the matrix fractionates DNA according to its degree of CpG methylation, strongly retaining those sequences that are highly methylated. Using this column, we have developed a procedure for bulk isolation of CpG islands from human genomic DNA. As CpG islands overlap with approximately 60% of human genes, the resulting CpG island library can be used to isolate full-length cDNAs and to place genes on genomic maps.

    Funded by: Wellcome Trust

    Nature genetics 1994;6;3;236-44

Gene lists (4)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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