G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001990
Gene symbol
ABCB8 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
ATP-binding cassette, sub-family B (MDR/TAP), member 8
Orthologue
G00000741 (Mus musculus)

Databases (7)

Gene
ENSG00000197150 (Ensembl human gene)
11194 (Entrez Gene)
1155 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
ABCB8 (GeneCards)
Literature
605464 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:49 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
Q9NUT2 (UniProt)

Synonyms (3)

  • EST328128
  • M-ABC1
  • MABC1

Literature (12)

Pubmed - other

  • Association study between single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 199 drug-related genes and commonly measured quantitative traits of 752 healthy Japanese subjects.

    Saito A, Kawamoto M and Kamatani N

    Division of Genomic Medicine, Department of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. a-saito@horae.dti.ne.jp

    With dense single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps for 199 drug-related genes, we examined associations between 4190 SNPs and 38 commonly measured quantitative traits using data from 752 healthy Japanese subjects. On analysis, we observed a strong association between five SNPs within the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene and serum total bilirubin levels (minimum P-value in Mann-Whitney test=1.82 x 10(10)). UGT1A1 catalyzes the conjugation of bilirubin with glucuronic acid, thus enhancing bilirubin elimination. This enzyme is known to play an important role in the variation of serum bilirubin levels. The five SNPs, including a nonsynonymous SNP-rs4148323 (211G>A or G71R variant allele known as UGT1A1*6)-showed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. No other genes were clearly associated with serum total bilirubin levels. Results of linear multiple regression analysis on serum total bilirubin levels followed by analysis of variance showed that at least 13% of the variance in serum total bilirubin levels could be explained by three haplotype-tagging SNPs in the UGT1A1 gene.

    Journal of human genetics 2009;54;6;317-23

  • Exclusion of ABCB8 and ABCB10 as cancer candidate genes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Tang L, Bergevoet SM, Franssen LE, de Witte T, Jansen JH, Raymakers RA and van der Reijden BA

    Leukemia 2009;23;5;1000-2

  • ABCB8 mediates doxorubicin resistance in melanoma cells by protecting the mitochondrial genome.

    Elliott AM and Al-Hajj MA

    MedImmune (AstraZeneca Biologics Unit), One MedImmune Way, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA.

    Despite their initial effectiveness in the treatment of melanoma, chemotherapeutic agents are ultimately futile against this most aggressive form of skin cancer, and patients inevitably succumb to the disease. One of the mechanisms by which residual melanoma cells become chemoresistant is via the decreased efficiency of chemotherapeutics through the action of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins that are variably expressed by the tumor cells. The clinical relevance of the ABC transporters in the context of cancer is paramount. Inhibitors of these transporters have been shown to increase the efficacy of standard therapy in experimental systems. Their clinical application requires better understanding of the role individual transporters play in the mechanism and the development of more specific inhibitors with minimal off target effects. ABC transporters in tumor cells have been shown to confer multidrug resistance in many solid tumors. However, their role in melanomas is far from clear. Here, we prospectively identify ABCB8 as a specific and major player in the chemoresistance of several melanoma cell lines. ABCB8 knockdown with shRNA reduced doxorubicin resistance approximately 3- to 4-fold in these cells. Furthermore, we show that this reversal is specific to doxorubicin and not to other commonly used chemotherapeutics. Our results also provide evidence that ABCB8 conferred resistance through the protection of mitochondrial DNA from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage.

    Molecular cancer research : MCR 2009;7;1;79-87

  • Diversification of transcriptional modulation: large-scale identification and characterization of putative alternative promoters of human genes.

    Kimura K, Wakamatsu A, Suzuki Y, Ota T, Nishikawa T, Yamashita R, Yamamoto J, Sekine M, Tsuritani K, Wakaguri H, Ishii S, Sugiyama T, Saito K, Isono Y, Irie R, Kushida N, Yoneyama T, Otsuka R, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Kondo H, Wagatsuma M, Murakawa K, Ishida S, Ishibashi T, Takahashi-Fujii A, Tanase T, Nagai K, Kikuchi H, Nakai K, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Life Science Research Laboratory, Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, 185-8601, Japan.

    By analyzing 1,780,295 5'-end sequences of human full-length cDNAs derived from 164 kinds of oligo-cap cDNA libraries, we identified 269,774 independent positions of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) for 14,628 human RefSeq genes. These TSSs were clustered into 30,964 clusters that were separated from each other by more than 500 bp and thus are very likely to constitute mutually distinct alternative promoters. To our surprise, at least 7674 (52%) human RefSeq genes were subject to regulation by putative alternative promoters (PAPs). On average, there were 3.1 PAPs per gene, with the composition of one CpG-island-containing promoter per 2.6 CpG-less promoters. In 17% of the PAP-containing loci, tissue-specific use of the PAPs was observed. The richest tissue sources of the tissue-specific PAPs were testis and brain. It was also intriguing that the PAP-containing promoters were enriched in the genes encoding signal transduction-related proteins and were rarer in the genes encoding extracellular proteins, possibly reflecting the varied functional requirement for and the restricted expression of those categories of genes, respectively. The patterns of the first exons were highly diverse as well. On average, there were 7.7 different splicing types of first exons per locus partly produced by the PAPs, suggesting that a wide variety of transcripts can be achieved by this mechanism. Our findings suggest that use of alternate promoters and consequent alternative use of first exons should play a pivotal role in generating the complexity required for the highly elaborated molecular systems in humans.

    Genome research 2006;16;1;55-65

  • A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome.

    Stelzl U, Worm U, Lalowski M, Haenig C, Brembeck FH, Goehler H, Stroedicke M, Zenkner M, Schoenherr A, Koeppen S, Timm J, Mintzlaff S, Abraham C, Bock N, Kietzmann S, Goedde A, Toksöz E, Droege A, Krobitsch S, Korn B, Birchmeier W, Lehrach H and Wanker EE

    Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, 13092 Berlin-Buch, Germany.

    Protein-protein interaction maps provide a valuable framework for a better understanding of the functional organization of the proteome. To detect interacting pairs of human proteins systematically, a protein matrix of 4456 baits and 5632 preys was screened by automated yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction mating. We identified 3186 mostly novel interactions among 1705 proteins, resulting in a large, highly connected network. Independent pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated the overall quality of the Y2H interactions. Using topological and GO criteria, a scoring system was developed to define 911 high-confidence interactions among 401 proteins. Furthermore, the network was searched for interactions linking uncharacterized gene products and human disease proteins to regulatory cellular pathways. Two novel Axin-1 interactions were validated experimentally, characterizing ANP32A and CRMP1 as modulators of Wnt signaling. Systematic human protein interaction screens can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of protein function and cellular processes.

    Cell 2005;122;6;957-68

  • Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.

    Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, Otsuki T, Sugiyama T, Irie R, Wakamatsu A, Hayashi K, Sato H, Nagai K, Kimura K, Makita H, Sekine M, Obayashi M, Nishi T, Shibahara T, Tanaka T, Ishii S, Yamamoto J, Saito K, Kawai Y, Isono Y, Nakamura Y, Nagahari K, Murakami K, Yasuda T, Iwayanagi T, Wagatsuma M, Shiratori A, Sudo H, Hosoiri T, Kaku Y, Kodaira H, Kondo H, Sugawara M, Takahashi M, Kanda K, Yokoi T, Furuya T, Kikkawa E, Omura Y, Abe K, Kamihara K, Katsuta N, Sato K, Tanikawa M, Yamazaki M, Ninomiya K, Ishibashi T, Yamashita H, Murakawa K, Fujimori K, Tanai H, Kimata M, Watanabe M, Hiraoka S, Chiba Y, Ishida S, Ono Y, Takiguchi S, Watanabe S, Yosida M, Hotuta T, Kusano J, Kanehori K, Takahashi-Fujii A, Hara H, Tanase TO, Nomura Y, Togiya S, Komai F, Hara R, Takeuchi K, Arita M, Imose N, Musashino K, Yuuki H, Oshima A, Sasaki N, Aotsuka S, Yoshikawa Y, Matsunawa H, Ichihara T, Shiohata N, Sano S, Moriya S, Momiyama H, Satoh N, Takami S, Terashima Y, Suzuki O, Nakagawa S, Senoh A, Mizoguchi H, Goto Y, Shimizu F, Wakebe H, Hishigaki H, Watanabe T, Sugiyama A, Takemoto M, Kawakami B, Yamazaki M, Watanabe K, Kumagai A, Itakura S, Fukuzumi Y, Fujimori Y, Komiyama M, Tashiro H, Tanigami A, Fujiwara T, Ono T, Yamada K, Fujii Y, Ozaki K, Hirao M, Ohmori Y, Kawabata A, Hikiji T, Kobatake N, Inagaki H, Ikema Y, Okamoto S, Okitani R, Kawakami T, Noguchi S, Itoh T, Shigeta K, Senba T, Matsumura K, Nakajima Y, Mizuno T, Morinaga M, Sasaki M, Togashi T, Oyama M, Hata H, Watanabe M, Komatsu T, Mizushima-Sugano J, Satoh T, Shirai Y, Takahashi Y, Nakagawa K, Okumura K, Nagase T, Nomura N, Kikuchi H, Masuho Y, Yamashita R, Nakai K, Yada T, Nakamura Y, Ohara O, Isogai T and Sugano S

    Helix Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812, Japan.

    As a base for human transcriptome and functional genomics, we created the "full-length long Japan" (FLJ) collection of sequenced human cDNAs. We determined the entire sequence of 21,243 selected clones and found that 14,490 cDNAs (10,897 clusters) were unique to the FLJ collection. About half of them (5,416) seemed to be protein-coding. Of those, 1,999 clusters had not been predicted by computational methods. The distribution of GC content of nonpredicted cDNAs had a peak at approximately 58% compared with a peak at approximately 42%for predicted cDNAs. Thus, there seems to be a slight bias against GC-rich transcripts in current gene prediction procedures. The rest of the cDNAs unique to the FLJ collection (5,481) contained no obvious open reading frames (ORFs) and thus are candidate noncoding RNAs. About one-fourth of them (1,378) showed a clear pattern of splicing. The distribution of GC content of noncoding cDNAs was narrow and had a peak at approximately 42%, relatively low compared with that of protein-coding cDNAs.

    Nature genetics 2004;36;1;40-5

  • Three hundred twenty-six genetic variations in genes encoding nine members of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B (ABCB/MDR/TAP), in the Japanese population.

    Saito S, Iida A, Sekine A, Miura Y, Ogawa C, Kawauchi S, Higuchi S and Nakamura Y

    Laboratory for Genotyping, SNP Research Center, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Tokyo, Japan.

    We screened DNAs from 48 Japanese individuals for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nine genes encoding components of ATP-binding cassette subfamily B (ABCB/MDR/TAP) by directly sequencing the entire applicable genomic regions except for repetitive elements. This approach identified 297 SNPs and 29 insertion/deletion polymorphisms among the nine genes. Of the 297 SNPs, 50 were identified in the ABCB1 gene, 14 in TAP], 35 in TAP2, 48 in ABCB4, 13 in ABCB7, 21 in ABCB8, 21 in ABCB9, 13 in ABCB10, and 82 in ABCB11. Thirteen were located in 5' flanking regions, 237 in introns, 37 in exons, and 10 in 3' flanking regions. These variants may contribute to investigations of possible correlations between genotypes and disease-susceptibility phenotypes or responsiveness to drug therapy.

    Journal of human genetics 2002;47;1;38-50

  • Identification and characterization of a mammalian mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette membrane protein.

    Hogue DL, Liu L and Ling V

    BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z 4L3, Canada.

    Membrane proteins of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily are involved in the transport of diverse substrates across organellar and plasma membranes of the mammalian cell. Most human ABC proteins identified to date are associated with genetically linked diseases or clinically relevant phenotypes. We describe a new human half-molecule ABC protein, designated M-ABC1, that contains a predicted single membrane and ATP-binding cassette domain. M-ABC1 is localized to membranes of the mitochondria and its transcript is expressed in all tissues. The N-terminal region of the M-ABC1 protein was shown to function independently as a mitochondrial signal sequence by its ability to target the green fluorescent protein to the mitochondria. The monomeric 60 kDa M-ABC1 protein was chemically crosslinked in vivo into a major protein species of 120-130 kDa, thereby confirming that M-ABC1 exists within a higher ordered ABC protein complex. A dominant negative repression approach using M-ABC1 protein with site-directed mutations in its Walker A motif revealed that the mutant protein was rapidly degraded and indicated that the intact Walker A motif of M-ABC1 was required for its stability. The identification of M-ABC1 extends the known distribution of members of the ABC protein family into the mammalian mitochondrion.

    Journal of molecular biology 1999;285;1;379-89

  • Construction and characterization of a full length-enriched and a 5'-end-enriched cDNA library.

    Suzuki Y, Yoshitomo-Nakagawa K, Maruyama K, Suyama A and Sugano S

    International and Interdisciplinary Studies, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

    Using 'oligo-capped' mRNA [Maruyama, K., Sugano, S., 1994. Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides. Gene 138, 171-174], whose cap structure was replaced by a synthetic oligonucleotide, we constructed two types of cDNA library. One is a 'full length-enriched cDNA library' which has a high content of full-length cDNA clones and the other is a '5'-end-enriched cDNA library', which has a high content of cDNA clones with their mRNA start sites. The 5'-end-enriched library was constructed especially for isolating the mRNA start sites of long mRNAs. In order to characterize these libraries, we performed one-pass sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones from both libraries (84 clones for the full length-enriched cDNA library and 159 clones for the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library). The cDNA clones of the polypeptide chain elongation factor 1 alpha were most frequently (nine clones) isolated, and more than 80% of them (eight clones) contained the mRNA start site of the gene. Furthermore, about 80% of the cDNA clones of both libraries whose sequence matched with known genes had the known 5' ends or sequences upstream of the known 5' ends (28 out of 35 for the full length-enriched library and 51 out of 62 for the 5'-end-enriched library). The longest full-length clone of the full length-enriched cDNA library was about 3300 bp (among 28 clones). In contrast, seven clones (out of the 51 clones with the mRNA start sites) from the 5'-end-enriched cDNA library came from mRNAs whose length is more than 3500 bp. These cDNA libraries may be useful for generating 5' ESTs with the information of the mRNA start sites that are now scarce in the EST database.

    Gene 1997;200;1-2;149-56

  • Characterization of the human ABC superfamily: isolation and mapping of 21 new genes using the expressed sequence tags database.

    Allikmets R, Gerrard B, Hutchinson A and Dean M

    Laboratory of Viral Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, MD 21702, USA.

    As an approach to characterizing all human ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily genes, a search of the human expressed sequence tag (EST) database was performed using sequences from known ABC genes. A total of 105 clones, containing sequences of potential ABC genes, were identified, representing 21 distinct genes. This brings the total number of characterized human ABC genes from 12 to 33. The new ABC genes were mapped by PCR on somatic cell and radiation hybrid panels and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). The genes are located on human chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16, 17 and X; at locations distinct from previously mapped members of the superfamily. The characterized genes display extensive diversity in sequence and expression pattern and this information was utilized to determine potential structural, functional and evolutionary relationships to previously characterized members of the ABC superfamily.

    Human molecular genetics 1996;5;10;1649-55

  • Oligo-capping: a simple method to replace the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs with oligoribonucleotides.

    Maruyama K and Sugano S

    Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Japan.

    We have devised a method to replace the cap structure of a mRNA with an oligoribonucleotide (r-oligo) to label the 5' end of eukaryotic mRNAs. The method consists of removing the cap with tobacco acid pyrophosphatase (TAP) and ligating r-oligos to decapped mRNAs with T4 RNA ligase. This reaction was made cap-specific by removing 5'-phosphates of non-capped RNAs with alkaline phosphatase prior to TAP treatment. Unlike the conventional methods that label the 5' end of cDNAs, this method specifically labels the capped end of the mRNAs with a synthetic r-oligo prior to first-strand cDNA synthesis. The 5' end of the mRNA was identified quite simply by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    Gene 1994;138;1-2;171-4

Gene lists (6)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000010 G2C Homo sapiens Human mitochondria Human orthologues of mouse mitochondria adapted from Collins et al (2006) 91
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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