G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001650
Gene symbol
DPM1 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
dolichyl-phosphate mannosyltransferase polypeptide 1, catalytic subunit
Orthologue
G00000401 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000032737 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000101126 (Ensembl human gene)
8813 (Entrez Gene)
740 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DPM1 (GeneCards)
Literature
603503 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:3005 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O60762 (UniProt)

Synonyms (2)

  • CDGIE
  • MPDS

Literature (15)

Pubmed - other

  • Purification and identification of G protein-coupled receptor protein complexes under native conditions.

    Daulat AM, Maurice P, Froment C, Guillaume JL, Broussard C, Monsarrat B, Delagrange P and Jockers R

    Department of Cell Biology, Institut Cochin, INSERM U567, CNRS UMR 8104, Université Paris Descartes, France.

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and are of major therapeutic importance. The identification of GPCR-associated proteins is an important step toward a better understanding of these receptors. However, current methods are not satisfying as only isolated receptor domains (intracellular loops or carboxyl-terminal tails) can be used as "bait." We report here a method based on tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry that overcomes these limitations as the entire receptor is used to identify protein complexes formed in living mammalian cells. The human MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors were chosen as model GPCRs. Both receptors were tagged with the tandem affinity purification tag at their carboxyl-terminal tails and expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Receptor solubilization and purification conditions were optimized. The method was validated by the co-purification of G(i) proteins, which are well known GPCR interaction partners but which are difficult to identify with current protein-protein interaction assays. Several new and functionally relevant MT(1)- and MT(2)-associated proteins were identified; some of them were common to both receptors, and others were specific for each subtype. Taken together, our protocol allowed for the first time the purification of GPCR-associated proteins under native conditions in quantities suitable for mass spectrometry analysis.

    Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP 2007;6;5;835-44

  • Large-scale mapping of human protein-protein interactions by mass spectrometry.

    Ewing RM, Chu P, Elisma F, Li H, Taylor P, Climie S, McBroom-Cerajewski L, Robinson MD, O'Connor L, Li M, Taylor R, Dharsee M, Ho Y, Heilbut A, Moore L, Zhang S, Ornatsky O, Bukhman YV, Ethier M, Sheng Y, Vasilescu J, Abu-Farha M, Lambert JP, Duewel HS, Stewart II, Kuehl B, Hogue K, Colwill K, Gladwish K, Muskat B, Kinach R, Adams SL, Moran MF, Morin GB, Topaloglou T and Figeys D

    Protana, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is an invaluable tool for understanding protein function. Here, we report the first large-scale study of protein-protein interactions in human cells using a mass spectrometry-based approach. The study maps protein interactions for 338 bait proteins that were selected based on known or suspected disease and functional associations. Large-scale immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged versions of these proteins followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 24,540 potential protein interactions. False positives and redundant hits were filtered out using empirical criteria and a calculated interaction confidence score, producing a data set of 6463 interactions between 2235 distinct proteins. This data set was further cross-validated using previously published and predicted human protein interactions. In-depth mining of the data set shows that it represents a valuable source of novel protein-protein interactions with relevance to human diseases. In addition, via our preliminary analysis, we report many novel protein interactions and pathway associations.

    Molecular systems biology 2007;3;89

  • Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.

    Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, Macek B, Kumar C, Mortensen P and Mann M

    Center for Experimental BioInformatics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5230 Odense, Denmark.

    Cell signaling mechanisms often transmit information via posttranslational protein modifications, most importantly reversible protein phosphorylation. Here we develop and apply a general mass spectrometric technology for identification and quantitation of phosphorylation sites as a function of stimulus, time, and subcellular location. We have detected 6,600 phosphorylation sites on 2,244 proteins and have determined their temporal dynamics after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and recorded them in the Phosida database. Fourteen percent of phosphorylation sites are modulated at least 2-fold by EGF, and these were classified by their temporal profiles. Surprisingly, a majority of proteins contain multiple phosphorylation sites showing different kinetics, suggesting that they serve as platforms for integrating signals. In addition to protein kinase cascades, the targets of reversible phosphorylation include ubiquitin ligases, guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and at least 46 different transcriptional regulators. The dynamic phosphoproteome provides a missing link in a global, integrative view of cellular regulation.

    Cell 2006;127;3;635-48

  • DPM1, the catalytic subunit of dolichol-phosphate mannose synthase, is tethered to and stabilized on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by DPM3.

    Ashida H, Maeda Y and Kinoshita T

    Department of Immunoregulation, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Japan.

    Dolichol-phosphate mannose (DPM) synthase is required for synthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, N-glycan precursor, protein O-mannose, and C-mannose. We previously identified DPM3, the third component of this enzyme, which was co-purified with DPM1 and DPM2. Here, we have established mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) 2.38 cells that were defective in DPM3. CHO2.38 cells were negative for GPI-anchored proteins, and microsomes from these cells showed no detectable DPM synthase activity, indicating that DPM3 is an essential component of this enzyme. A coiled-coil domain near the C terminus of DPM3 was important for tethering DPM1, the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and, therefore, was critical for enzyme activity. On the other hand, two transmembrane regions in the N-terminal portion of DPM3 showed no specific functions. DPM1 was rapidly degraded by the proteasome in the absence of DPM3. Free DPM1 was strongly associated with the C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), a chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase, suggesting that DPM1 is ubiquitinated, at least in part, by CHIP.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2006;281;2;896-904

  • A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome.

    Stelzl U, Worm U, Lalowski M, Haenig C, Brembeck FH, Goehler H, Stroedicke M, Zenkner M, Schoenherr A, Koeppen S, Timm J, Mintzlaff S, Abraham C, Bock N, Kietzmann S, Goedde A, Toksöz E, Droege A, Krobitsch S, Korn B, Birchmeier W, Lehrach H and Wanker EE

    Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, 13092 Berlin-Buch, Germany.

    Protein-protein interaction maps provide a valuable framework for a better understanding of the functional organization of the proteome. To detect interacting pairs of human proteins systematically, a protein matrix of 4456 baits and 5632 preys was screened by automated yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction mating. We identified 3186 mostly novel interactions among 1705 proteins, resulting in a large, highly connected network. Independent pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays validated the overall quality of the Y2H interactions. Using topological and GO criteria, a scoring system was developed to define 911 high-confidence interactions among 401 proteins. Furthermore, the network was searched for interactions linking uncharacterized gene products and human disease proteins to regulatory cellular pathways. Two novel Axin-1 interactions were validated experimentally, characterizing ANP32A and CRMP1 as modulators of Wnt signaling. Systematic human protein interaction screens can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of protein function and cellular processes.

    Cell 2005;122;6;957-68

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) type Ie. A new patient.

    García-Silva MT, Matthijs G, Schollen E, Cabrera JC, Sanchez del Pozo J, Martí Herreros M, Simón R, Maties M, Martín Hernández E, Hennet T and Briones P

    Department of Paediatrics, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. mgarcias.hdoc@salud.madrid.org

    CDG Ie is caused by a deficiency of dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase 1 (DPM1), an enzyme involved in N-glycan assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Three proteins are known to be part of the synthase complex: DPM 1, DPM2 and DPM3. Only mutations in DPM1, the catalytic subunit, have been described in three families. One was homozygous for the c274C>G (R92G) mutation in DPM1 and two others were compound heterozygous for R92G and a c628delC deletion or a c331-343del13, respectively. Clinical features were a severe infantile encephalopathy, early intractable seizures, acquired microcephaly, and some dysmorphic features. We report a patient with milder symptoms: microcephaly, dysmorphic features, developmental delay, optic atrophy, and cerebellar dysfunction without cerebellar atrophy. The patient is homozygous for a new mutation in exon 9 of the DPM1 gene (c742T>C (S248P)). Our findings extend the spectrum of CDG Ie.

    Journal of inherited metabolic disease 2004;27;5;591-600

  • The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20.

    Deloukas P, Matthews LH, Ashurst J, Burton J, Gilbert JG, Jones M, Stavrides G, Almeida JP, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Barlow KF, Bates KN, Beard LM, Beare DM, Beasley OP, Bird CP, Blakey SE, Bridgeman AM, Brown AJ, Buck D, Burrill W, Butler AP, Carder C, Carter NP, Chapman JC, Clamp M, Clark G, Clark LN, Clark SY, Clee CM, Clegg S, Cobley VE, Collier RE, Connor R, Corby NR, Coulson A, Coville GJ, Deadman R, Dhami P, Dunn M, Ellington AG, Frankland JA, Fraser A, French L, Garner P, Grafham DV, Griffiths C, Griffiths MN, Gwilliam R, Hall RE, Hammond S, Harley JL, Heath PD, Ho S, Holden JL, Howden PJ, Huckle E, Hunt AR, Hunt SE, Jekosch K, Johnson CM, Johnson D, Kay MP, Kimberley AM, King A, Knights A, Laird GK, Lawlor S, Lehvaslaiho MH, Leversha M, Lloyd C, Lloyd DM, Lovell JD, Marsh VL, Martin SL, McConnachie LJ, McLay K, McMurray AA, Milne S, Mistry D, Moore MJ, Mullikin JC, Nickerson T, Oliver K, Parker A, Patel R, Pearce TA, Peck AI, Phillimore BJ, Prathalingam SR, Plumb RW, Ramsay H, Rice CM, Ross MT, Scott CE, Sehra HK, Shownkeen R, Sims S, Skuce CD, Smith ML, Soderlund C, Steward CA, Sulston JE, Swann M, Sycamore N, Taylor R, Tee L, Thomas DW, Thorpe A, Tracey A, Tromans AC, Vaudin M, Wall M, Wallis JM, Whitehead SL, Whittaker P, Willey DL, Williams L, Williams SA, Wilming L, Wray PW, Hubbard T, Durbin RM, Bentley DR, Beck S and Rogers J

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. panos@sanger.ac.uk

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes.

    Nature 2001;414;6866;865-71

  • Human dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase consists of three subunits, DPM1, DPM2 and DPM3.

    Maeda Y, Tanaka S, Hino J, Kangawa K and Kinoshita T

    Department of Immunoregulation, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

    Dolichol-phosphate-mannose (DPM) synthase generates mannosyl donors for glycosylphosphatidylinositols, N-glycan and protein O- and C-mannosylation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this enzyme is encoded by DPM1. We reported previously that mammalian DPM synthase contains catalytic DPM1 and regulatory DPM2 subunits, and that DPM1 requires DPM2 for its stable expression in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we report that human DPM synthase consists of three subunits. The third subunit, DPM3, comprises 92 amino acids associated with DPM1 via its C-terminal domain and with DPM2 via its N-terminal portion. The stability of DPM3 was dependent upon DPM2. However, overexpression of DPM3 in Lec15 cells, a null mutant of DPM2, restored the biosynthesis of DPM with an increase in DPM1, indicating that DPM3 directly stabilized DPM1. Therefore, DPM2 stabilizes DPM3 and DPM3 stabilizes DPM1. DPM synthase activity was 10 times higher in the presence of DPM2, indicating that DPM2 also plays a role in the enzymatic reaction. Schizosaccharomyces pombe has proteins that resemble three human subunits; S.pombe DPM3 restored biosynthesis of DPM in Lec15 cells, indicating its orthologous relationship to human DPM3.

    The EMBO journal 2000;19;11;2475-82

  • Deficiency of dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase-1 causes congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ie.

    Imbach T, Schenk B, Schollen E, Burda P, Stutz A, Grunewald S, Bailie NM, King MD, Jaeken J, Matthijs G, Berger EG, Aebi M and Hennet T

    Institute of Physiology, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), formerly known as carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes, lead to diseases with variable clinical pictures. We report the delineation of a novel type of CDG identified in 2 children presenting with severe developmental delay, seizures, and dysmorphic features. We detected hypoglycosylation on serum transferrin and cerebrospinal fluid beta-trace protein. Lipid-linked oligosaccharides in the endoplasmic reticulum of patient fibroblasts showed an accumulation of the dolichyl pyrophosphate Man(5)GlcNAc(2) structure, compatible with the reduced dolichol-phosphate-mannose synthase (DolP-Man synthase) activity detected in these patients. Accordingly, 2 mutant alleles of the DolP-Man synthase DPM1 gene, 1 with a 274C>G transversion, the other with a 628delC deletion, were detected in both siblings. Complementation analysis using DPM1-null murine Thy1-deficient cells confirmed the detrimental effect of both mutations on the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, mannose supplementation failed to improve the glycosylation status of DPM1-deficient fibroblast cells, thus precluding a possible therapeutic application of mannose in the patients. Because DPM1 deficiency, like other subtypes of CDG-I, impairs the assembly of N-glycans, this novel glycosylation defect was named CDG-Ie.

    The Journal of clinical investigation 2000;105;2;233-9

  • Dolichol phosphate mannose synthase (DPM1) mutations define congenital disorder of glycosylation Ie (CDG-Ie)

    Kim S, Westphal V, Srikrishna G, Mehta DP, Peterson S, Filiano J, Karnes PS, Patterson MC and Freeze HH

    The Burnham Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are metabolic deficiencies in glycoprotein biosynthesis that usually cause severe mental and psychomotor retardation. Different forms of CDGs can be recognized by altered isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns of serum transferrin (Tf). Two patients with these symptoms and similar abnormal Tf IEF patterns were analyzed by metabolic labeling of fibroblasts with ¿2-(3)Hmannose. The patients produced a truncated dolichol-linked precursor oligosaccharide with 5 mannose residues, instead of the normal precursor with 9 mannose residues. Addition of 250 microM mannose to the culture medium corrected the size of the truncated oligosaccharide. Microsomes from fibroblasts of these patients were approximately 95% deficient in dolichol-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man) synthase activity, with an apparent K(m) for GDP-Man approximately 6-fold higher than normal. DPM1, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit of Dol-P-Man synthase, was altered in both patients. One patient had a point mutation, C(274)G, causing an R(92)G change in the coding sequence. The other patient also had the C(274)G mutation and a 13-bp deletion that presumably resulted in an unstable transcript. Defects in DPM1 define a new glycosylation disorder, CDG-Ie.

    Funded by: NIDDK NIH HHS: DK55615, R01 DK055615; NIGMS NIH HHS: R01 GM55695

    The Journal of clinical investigation 2000;105;2;191-8

  • DPM2 regulates biosynthesis of dolichol phosphate-mannose in mammalian cells: correct subcellular localization and stabilization of DPM1, and binding of dolichol phosphate.

    Maeda Y, Tomita S, Watanabe R, Ohishi K and Kinoshita T

    Department of Immunoregulation, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

    Biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol and N-glycan precursor is dependent upon a mannosyl donor, dolichol phosphate-mannose (DPM). The Thy-1negative class E mutant of mouse lymphoma and Lec15 mutant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are incapable of DPM synthesis. The class E mutant is defective in the DPM1 gene which encodes a mammalian homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dpm1p that is a DPM synthase, whereas Lec15 is a different mutant, indicating that mammalian DPM1 is not sufficient for DPM synthesis. Here we report expression cloning of a new gene, DPM2, which is defective in Lec15 cells. DPM2, an 84 amino acid membrane protein expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), makes a complex with DPM1 that is essential for the ER localization and stable expression of DPM1. Moreover, DPM2 enhances binding of dolichol phosphate, a substrate of DPM synthase. Mammalian DPM1 is catalytic because a fusion protein of DPM1 that was stably expressed in the ER synthesized DPM without DPM2. Therefore, biosynthesis of DPM in mammalian cells is regulated by DPM2.

    The EMBO journal 1998;17;17;4920-9

  • A homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dpm1p is not sufficient for synthesis of dolichol-phosphate-mannose in mammalian cells.

    Tomita S, Inoue N, Maeda Y, Ohishi K, Takeda J and Kinoshita T

    Department of Immunoregulation, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.

    Dolichol-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man) serves as a donor of mannosyl residues in major eukaryotic glycoconjugates. It donates four mannosyl residues in the N-linked oligosaccharide precursor and all three mannosyl residues in the core of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. In yeasts it also donates one mannose to the O-linked oligosaccharide. The yeast DPM1 gene encodes a Dol-P-Man synthase that is a transmembrane protein expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. We cloned human and mouse homologues of DPM1, termed hDPM1 and mDPM1, respectively, both of which encode proteins of 260 amino acids, having 30% amino acid identity with yeast Dpm1 protein but lacking a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, which exists in the yeast synthase. Human and mouse DPM1 cDNA restored Dol-P-Man synthesis in mouse Thy-1-deficient mutant class E cells. Mouse class E mutant cells had an inactivating mutation in the mDPM1 gene, indicating that mDPM1 is the gene for class E mutant. In contrast, hDPM1 and mDPM1 cDNA did not complement another Dol-P-Man synthesis mutant, hamster Lec15 cells, whereas yeast DPM1 restored both mutants. Therefore, in contrast to yeast, mammalian cells require hDPM1/mDPM1 protein and a product of another gene that is defective in Lec15 mutant cells for synthesis of Dol-P-Man.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 1998;273;15;9249-54

  • Human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae dolichol phosphate mannose synthases represent two classes of the enzyme, but both function in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Colussi PA, Taron CH, Mack JC and Orlean P

    Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois, 309 Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

    Dolichol phosphate mannose (Dol-P-Man), formed upon transfer of Man from GDPMan to Dol-P, is a mannosyl donor in pathways leading to N-glycosylation, glycosyl phosphatidylinositol membrane anchoring, and O-mannosylation of protein. Dol-P-Man synthase is an essential protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have cloned cDNAs encoding human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins that resemble S. cerevisiae Dol-P-Man synthase. Disruption of the gene for the S. pombe Dol-P-Man synthase homolog, dpm1(+), is lethal. The known Dol-P-Man synthase sequences can be divided into two classes. One contains the S. cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis, and Trypanosoma brucei enzymes, which have a COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain, and the other contains the human, S. pombe, and Caenorhabditis synthases, which lack a hydrophobic COOH-terminal domain. The two classes of synthase are functionally equivalent, because S. cerevisiae DPM1 and its human counterpart both complement the lethal null mutation in S. pombe dpm1(+). The findings that Dol-P-Man synthase is essential in yeast and that the Ustilago and Trypanosoma synthases are in a different class from the human enzyme raise the possibility that Dol-P-Man synthase could be exploited as a target for inhibitors of pathogenic eukaryotic microbes.

    Funded by: NIGMS NIH HHS: GM46220, R01 GM046220

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 1997;94;15;7873-8

Gene lists (4)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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