G2Cdb::Gene report

Gene id
G00001531
Gene symbol
DNAJC6 (HGNC)
Species
Homo sapiens
Description
DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily C, member 6
Orthologue
G00000282 (Mus musculus)

Databases (8)

Curated Gene
OTTHUMG00000009066 (Vega human gene)
Gene
ENSG00000116675 (Ensembl human gene)
9829 (Entrez Gene)
610 (G2Cdb plasticity & disease)
DNAJC6 (GeneCards)
Literature
608375 (OMIM)
Marker Symbol
HGNC:15469 (HGNC)
Protein Sequence
O75061 (UniProt)

Synonyms (1)

  • KIAA0473

Literature (14)

Pubmed - other

  • Assessment of a polymorphism of SDK1 with hypertension in Japanese Individuals.

    Oguri M, Kato K, Yokoi K, Yoshida T, Watanabe S, Metoki N, Yoshida H, Satoh K, Aoyagi Y, Nozawa Y and Yamada Y

    Department of Cardiology, Japanese Red Cross Nagoya First Hospital, Nagoya, Japan.

    Background: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although genetic studies have suggested that several genetic variants increase the risk for hypertension, the genes that underlie genetic susceptibility to this condition remain to be identified definitively. The purpose of the present study was to identify genetic variants that confer susceptibility to hypertension in Japanese individuals.

    Methods: A total of 5,734 Japanese individuals from two independent populations were examined: subject panel A comprised 2,066 hypertensive individuals and 824 controls; and subject panel B comprised 834 hypertensive individuals and 2,010 controls. The 150 polymorphisms examined in the present study were selected by genome-wide association studies of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke with the use of the GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affymetrix).

    Results: The chi(2)-test revealed that 10 polymorphisms were significantly (P < 0.05) related to the prevalence of hypertension in subject panel A. To validate the relations, these polymorphisms were examined in subject panel B. The A-->G polymorphism (rs645106) of SDK1 and the C-->G polymorphism (rs12078839) of RABGAP1L were significantly associated with hypertension in subject panel B. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for covariates, as well as a stepwise forward selection procedure revealed that the A-->G polymorphism of SDK1 was significantly associated with hypertension in both subject panels A and B, with the G allele protecting against this condition.

    Conclusions: SDK1 may be a susceptibility gene for hypertension in Japanese individuals, although the functional relevance of the identified polymorphism was not determined.

    American journal of hypertension 2010;23;1;70-7

  • Prefrontal cortex shotgun proteome analysis reveals altered calcium homeostasis and immune system imbalance in schizophrenia.

    Martins-de-Souza D, Gattaz WF, Schmitt A, Rewerts C, Maccarrone G, Dias-Neto E and Turck CW

    Laboratório de Neurociências, Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua. Dr. Ovidio Pires de Campos, no 785, Consolação, São Paulo, SP 05403-010, Brazil.

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease, likely to be caused by a combination of serial alterations in a number of genes and environmental factors. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's Area 46) is involved in schizophrenia and executes high-level functions such as working memory, differentiation of conflicting thoughts, determination of right and wrong concepts and attitudes, correct social behavior and personality expression. Global proteomic analysis of post-mortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from schizophrenia patients and non-schizophrenic individuals was performed using stable isotope labeling and shotgun proteomics. The analysis resulted in the identification of 1,261 proteins, 84 of which showed statistically significant differential expression, reinforcing previous data supporting the involvement of the immune system, calcium homeostasis, cytoskeleton assembly, and energy metabolism in schizophrenia. In addition a number of new potential markers were found that may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease.

    European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience 2009;259;3;151-63

  • Auxilin depletion causes self-assembly of clathrin into membraneless cages in vivo.

    Hirst J, Sahlender DA, Li S, Lubben NB, Borner GH and Robinson MS

    Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Wellcome Trust, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. jh228@cam.ac.uk

    Auxilin is a cofactor for Hsc70-mediated uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). However, small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the ubiquitous auxilin 2 in HeLa cells only moderately impairs clathrin-dependent trafficking. In this study, we show that HeLa cells also express auxilin 1, previously thought to be neuron specific, and that both auxilins need to be depleted for inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and intracellular sorting. Depleting both auxilins cause an approximately 50% reduction in the number of clathrin-coated pits at the plasma membrane but enhances the association of clathrin and adaptors with intracellular membranes. CCV fractions isolated from auxilin-depleted cells have an approximately 1.5-fold increase in clathrin content and more than fivefold increase in the amount of AP-2 adaptor complex and other endocytic machinery, with no concomitant increase in cargo. In addition, the structures isolated from auxilin-depleted cells are on average smaller than CCVs from control cells and are largely devoid of membrane, indicating that they are not CCVs but membraneless clathrin cages. Similar structures are observed by electron microscopy in intact auxilin-depleted HeLa cells. Together, these findings indicate that the two auxilins have overlapping functions and that they not only facilitate the uncoating of CCVs but also prevent the formation of nonproductive clathrin cages in the cytosol.

    Traffic (Copenhagen, Denmark) 2008;9;8;1354-71

  • The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    Gregory SG, Barlow KF, McLay KE, Kaul R, Swarbreck D, Dunham A, Scott CE, Howe KL, Woodfine K, Spencer CC, Jones MC, Gillson C, Searle S, Zhou Y, Kokocinski F, McDonald L, Evans R, Phillips K, Atkinson A, Cooper R, Jones C, Hall RE, Andrews TD, Lloyd C, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Ambrose KD, Anderson F, Andrew RW, Ashwell RI, Aubin K, Babbage AK, Bagguley CL, Bailey J, Beasley H, Bethel G, Bird CP, Bray-Allen S, Brown JY, Brown AJ, Buckley D, Burton J, Bye J, Carder C, Chapman JC, Clark SY, Clarke G, Clee C, Cobley V, Collier RE, Corby N, Coville GJ, Davies J, Deadman R, Dunn M, Earthrowl M, Ellington AG, Errington H, Frankish A, Frankland J, French L, Garner P, Garnett J, Gay L, Ghori MR, Gibson R, Gilby LM, Gillett W, Glithero RJ, Grafham DV, Griffiths C, Griffiths-Jones S, Grocock R, Hammond S, Harrison ES, Hart E, Haugen E, Heath PD, Holmes S, Holt K, Howden PJ, Hunt AR, Hunt SE, Hunter G, Isherwood J, James R, Johnson C, Johnson D, Joy A, Kay M, Kershaw JK, Kibukawa M, Kimberley AM, King A, Knights AJ, Lad H, Laird G, Lawlor S, Leongamornlert DA, Lloyd DM, Loveland J, Lovell J, Lush MJ, Lyne R, Martin S, Mashreghi-Mohammadi M, Matthews L, Matthews NS, McLaren S, Milne S, Mistry S, Moore MJ, Nickerson T, O'Dell CN, Oliver K, Palmeiri A, Palmer SA, Parker A, Patel D, Pearce AV, Peck AI, Pelan S, Phelps K, Phillimore BJ, Plumb R, Rajan J, Raymond C, Rouse G, Saenphimmachak C, Sehra HK, Sheridan E, Shownkeen R, Sims S, Skuce CD, Smith M, Steward C, Subramanian S, Sycamore N, Tracey A, Tromans A, Van Helmond Z, Wall M, Wallis JM, White S, Whitehead SL, Wilkinson JE, Willey DL, Williams H, Wilming L, Wray PW, Wu Z, Coulson A, Vaudin M, Sulston JE, Durbin R, Hubbard T, Wooster R, Dunham I, Carter NP, McVean G, Ross MT, Harrow J, Olson MV, Beck S, Rogers J, Bentley DR, Banerjee R, Bryant SP, Burford DC, Burrill WD, Clegg SM, Dhami P, Dovey O, Faulkner LM, Gribble SM, Langford CF, Pandian RD, Porter KM and Prigmore E

    The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. sgregory@chg.duhs.duke.edu

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome.

    Funded by: Medical Research Council: G0000107; Wellcome Trust

    Nature 2006;441;7091;315-21

  • The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

    Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, Shenmen CM, Grouse LH, Schuler G, Klein SL, Old S, Rasooly R, Good P, Guyer M, Peck AM, Derge JG, Lipman D, Collins FS, Jang W, Sherry S, Feolo M, Misquitta L, Lee E, Rotmistrovsky K, Greenhut SF, Schaefer CF, Buetow K, Bonner TI, Haussler D, Kent J, Kiekhaus M, Furey T, Brent M, Prange C, Schreiber K, Shapiro N, Bhat NK, Hopkins RF, Hsie F, Driscoll T, Soares MB, Casavant TL, Scheetz TE, Brown-stein MJ, Usdin TB, Toshiyuki S, Carninci P, Piao Y, Dudekula DB, Ko MS, Kawakami K, Suzuki Y, Sugano S, Gruber CE, Smith MR, Simmons B, Moore T, Waterman R, Johnson SL, Ruan Y, Wei CL, Mathavan S, Gunaratne PH, Wu J, Garcia AM, Hulyk SW, Fuh E, Yuan Y, Sneed A, Kowis C, Hodgson A, Muzny DM, McPherson J, Gibbs RA, Fahey J, Helton E, Ketteman M, Madan A, Rodrigues S, Sanchez A, Whiting M, Madari A, Young AC, Wetherby KD, Granite SJ, Kwong PN, Brinkley CP, Pearson RL, Bouffard GG, Blakesly RW, Green ED, Dickson MC, Rodriguez AC, Grimwood J, Schmutz J, Myers RM, Butterfield YS, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Krzywinski MI, Liao N, Morin R, Morrin R, Palmquist D, Petrescu AS, Skalska U, Smailus DE, Stott JM, Schnerch A, Schein JE, Jones SJ, Holt RA, Baross A, Marra MA, Clifton S, Makowski KA, Bosak S, Malek J and MGC Project Team

    The National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) project was designed to generate and sequence a publicly accessible cDNA resource containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) for every human and mouse gene. The project initially used a random strategy to select clones from a large number of cDNA libraries from diverse tissues. Candidate clones were chosen based on 5'-EST sequences, and then fully sequenced to high accuracy and analyzed by algorithms developed for this project. Currently, more than 11,000 human and 10,000 mouse genes are represented in MGC by at least one clone with a full ORF. The random selection approach is now reaching a saturation point, and a transition to protocols targeted at the missing transcripts is now required to complete the mouse and human collections. Comparison of the sequence of the MGC clones to reference genome sequences reveals that most cDNA clones are of very high sequence quality, although it is likely that some cDNAs may carry missense variants as a consequence of experimental artifact, such as PCR, cloning, or reverse transcriptase errors. Recently, a rat cDNA component was added to the project, and ongoing frog (Xenopus) and zebrafish (Danio) cDNA projects were expanded to take advantage of the high-throughput MGC pipeline.

    Funded by: PHS HHS: N01-C0-12400

    Genome research 2004;14;10B;2121-7

  • Sequence comparison of human and mouse genes reveals a homologous block structure in the promoter regions.

    Suzuki Y, Yamashita R, Shirota M, Sakakibara Y, Chiba J, Mizushima-Sugano J, Nakai K and Sugano S

    Human Genome Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan. ysuzuki@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Comparative sequence analysis was carried out for the regions adjacent to experimentally validated transcriptional start sites (TSSs), using 3324 pairs of human and mouse genes. We aligned the upstream putative promoter sequences over the 1-kb proximal regions and found that the sequence conservation could not be further extended at, on average, 510 bp upstream positions of the TSSs. This discontinuous manner of the sequence conservation revealed a "block" structure in about one-third of the putative promoter regions. Consistently, we also observed that G+C content and CpG frequency were significantly different inside and outside the blocks. Within the blocks, the sequence identity was uniformly 65% regardless of their length. About 90% of the previously characterized transcription factor binding sites were located within those blocks. In 46% of the blocks, the 5' ends were bounded by interspersed repetitive elements, some of which may have nucleated the genomic rearrangements. The length of the blocks was shortest in the promoters of genes encoding transcription factors and of genes whose expression patterns are brain specific, which suggests that the evolutional diversifications in the transcriptional modulations should be the most marked in these populations of genes.

    Genome research 2004;14;9;1711-8

  • Molecular and functional characterization of clathrin- and AP-2-binding determinants within a disordered domain of auxilin.

    Scheele U, Alves J, Frank R, Duwel M, Kalthoff C and Ungewickell E

    Departments of Cell Biology and Biophysical Chemistry, Hannover Medical School, 30625 Hannover, Germany.

    Uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles requires the J-domain protein auxilin for targeting hsc70 to the clathrin coats and for stimulating the hsc70 ATPase activity. This results in the release of hsc70-complexed clathrin triskelia and concomitant dissociation of the coat. To understand the complex role of auxilin in uncoating and clathrin assembly in more detail, we analyzed the molecular organization of its clathrin-binding domain (amino acids 547-813). CD spectroscopy of auxilin fragments revealed that the clathrin-binding domain is almost completely disordered in solution. By systematic mapping using synthetic peptides and by site-directed mutagenesis, we identified short peptide sequences involved in clathrin heavy chain and AP-2 binding and evaluated their significance for the function of auxilin. Some of the binding determinants, including those containing sequences 674DPF and 636WDW, showed dual specificity for both clathrin and AP-2. In contrast, the two DLL motifs within the clathrin-binding domain were exclusively involved in clathrin binding. Surprisingly, they interacted not only with the N-terminal domain of the heavy chain, but also with the distal domain. Moreover, both DLL peptides proved to be essential for clathrin assembly and uncoating. In addition, we found that the motif 726NWQ is required for efficient clathrin assembly activity. Auxilin shares a number of protein-protein interaction motifs with other endocytic proteins, including AP180. We demonstrate that AP180 and auxilin compete for binding to the alpha-ear domain of AP-2. Like AP180, auxilin also directly interacts with the ear domain of beta-adaptin. On the basis of our data, we propose a refined model for the uncoating mechanism of clathrin-coated vesicles.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2003;278;28;25357-68

  • Multiple interactions of auxilin 1 with clathrin and the AP-2 adaptor complex.

    Scheele U, Kalthoff C and Ungewickell E

    Department of Cell Biology, Center of Anatomy, Hannover Medical School, D-30125 Hannover, Germany.

    The removal of the clathrin coat is essential for vesicle fusion with acceptor membranes. Disassembly of the coat involves hsc70, which is specifically recruited by members of the auxilin protein family to clathrin lattices. In vitro, this function of auxilin does not require the globular amino-terminal domain of the clathrin heavy chain, which is known to play a prominent role in the interaction of clathrin with adaptors and numerous endocytic accessory proteins. Here we report the unexpected finding that the neuron-specific form of auxilin (auxilin 1) can also associate with the clathrin amino-terminal domain. This interaction is mediated through tandemly arranged sites within the auxilin 1 carboxyl-terminal segment 547-910. The overlapping auxilin 1 fragments 547-714 and 619-738 bind the clathrin terminal domain with high affinity, whereas auxilin 1-(715-901) interacts only poorly with it. All three fragments also associate with the clathrin distal domain and the alpha-appendage domain of AP-2. Moreover, they support efficient assembly of clathrin triskelia into regular cages. A novel uncoating assay was developed to demonstrate that auxilin 1-(715-901) functions efficiently as a cofactor for hsc70 in the uncoating of clathrin-coated vesicles. The multiple protein-protein interactions of auxilin 1 suggest that its function in endocytic trafficking may be more complex than previously anticipated.

    The Journal of biological chemistry 2001;276;39;36131-8

  • Three ways to make a vesicle.

    Kirchhausen T

    Harvard Medical School, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. kirchhausen@crystal.harvard.edu

    Cargo molecules have to be included in carrier vesicles of different forms and sizes to be transported between organelles. During this process, a limited set of proteins, including the coat proteins COPI, COPII and clathrin, carries out a programmed set of sequential interactions that lead to the budding of vesicles. A general model to explain the formation of coated vesicles is starting to emerge but the picture is more complex than we had imagined.

    Nature reviews. Molecular cell biology 2000;1;3;187-98

  • Mammalian HSP40/DNAJ homologs: cloning of novel cDNAs and a proposal for their classification and nomenclature.

    Ohtsuka K and Hata M

    Laboratory of Experimental Radiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. kohtsuka@aichi-cc.pref.aichi.jp

    We have cloned 10 novel full-length cDNAs of mouse and human HSP40/DNAJ homologs using expressed sequence tag (EST) clones found in the DDBJ/GenBank/EMBL DNA database. In this report, we tentatively designated them mHsp40, mDj3, mDj4, mDj5, mDj6, mDj7, mDj8, hDj9, mDj10, and mDj11. Based on the identity of the deduced amino acid sequences, mHsp40, mDj3, and mDj11 are orthologs of human Hsp40, rat Rdj2, and human Tpr2, respectively. We determined that mDj4 is identical with the recently isolated mouse Mrj (mammalian relative of DnaJ). PSORT analysis (a program that predicts the subcellular localization site of a given protein from its amino acid sequences) revealed that hDj9 has an N-terminal signal peptide; hence, its localization might be extracellular, suggesting that there may be a partner Hsp70 protein that acts together with the hDj9 outside of the cell. The same analysis indicated that mDj7 and mDj10 may have transmembrane domains. In order to simplify the complicated and confusing nomenclature of recently identified mammalian HSP40/DNAJ homologs, we propose here some new rules for their nomenclature. This proposed nomenclature includes the name of species with 2 lowercase letters such as hs (Homo sapiens), mm (Mus musculus) and rn (Rattus norvegicus); Dj standing for DnaJ; the name of types with A, B, and C, which were previously classified as type I, II, and III according to the domain structure of the homologs; and finally Arabic numerals according to the chronological order of registration of the sequence data into the database.

    Cell stress & chaperones 2000;5;2;98-112

  • Secretory protein trafficking and organelle dynamics in living cells.

    Lippincott-Schwartz J, Roberts TH and Hirschberg K

    Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch, NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. jlippin@helix.nih.gov

    Green fluorescent protein chimerae acting as reporters for protein localization and trafficking within the secretory membrane system of living cells have been used in a wide variety of applications, including time-lapse imaging, double-labeling, energy transfer, quantitation, and photobleaching experiments. Results from this work are clarifying the steps involved in the formation, translocation, and fusion of transport intermediates; the organization and biogenesis of organelles; and the mechanisms of protein retention, sorting, and recycling in the secretory pathway. In so doing, they are broadening our thinking about the temporal and spatial relationships among secretory organelles and the membrane trafficking pathways that operate between them.

    Annual review of cell and developmental biology 2000;16;557-89

  • Characterization of cDNA clones in size-fractionated cDNA libraries from human brain.

    Seki N, Ohira M, Nagase T, Ishikawa K, Miyajima N, Nakajima D, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Chiba, Japan. nseki@kazusa.or.jp

    To evaluate the size-fractionated cDNA libraries of human brain previously constructed (O. O'hara et al. DNA Research, 4, 53-59, 1997), the occurrence of chimeric clones and the content of clones with coding potentiality were analyzed using the randomly sampled clones with insert sizes of 5 to 7 kb. When the chromosomal location of 30 clones was determined by the radiation-hybrid mapping method, the map positions assigned from the 3'- and 5'-end sequences separately were coincident for 29 clones, suggesting that the occurrence of chimeric clones is at most 1/30. Using 91 clones mapped to chromosome 1, the content of clones that have the potentiality coding for proteins larger than 100 amino acid residues was estimated to be approximately 50% (46 out of 91 clones) on the basis of nucleotide sequence analysis and coding potentiality assay in vitro. No significant open reading frames were detected in the remaining clones. Although the clones coding for short peptides may not have been included in the above estimation, the libraries constructed from the whole brain mRNA fraction appear to contain a considerable amount of clones corresponding to the 5'-truncated transcripts in an unprocessed form and/or those with long 3'-untranslated regions.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1997;4;5;345-9

  • Prediction of the coding sequences of unidentified human genes. VIII. 78 new cDNA clones from brain which code for large proteins in vitro.

    Ishikawa K, Nagase T, Nakajima D, Seki N, Ohira M, Miyajima N, Tanaka A, Kotani H, Nomura N and Ohara O

    Kazusa DNA Research Institute, Chiba, Japan.

    As a part of our project for accumulating sequence information of the coding regions of unidentified human genes, we herein report the sequence features of 78 new cDNA clones isolated from human brain cDNA libraries as those which may code for large proteins. The sequence data showed that the average size of the cDNA inserts and their open reading frames was 6.0 kb and 2.8 kb (925 amino acid residues), respectively, and these clones produced the corresponding sizes of protein products in an in vitro transcription/translation system. Homology search against the public databases indicated that the predicted coding sequences of 68 genes contained sequences similar to known genes, 69% of which (47 genes) were related to cell signaling/communication, nucleic acid management, and cell structure/motility. The expression profiles of these genes in 14 different tissues have been analyzed by the reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction method, and 8 genes were found to be predominantly expressed in the brain.

    DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes 1997;4;5;307-13

Gene lists (5)

Gene List Source Species Name Description Gene count
L00000009 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSD Human orthologues of mouse PSD adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1080
L00000016 G2C Homo sapiens Human PSP Human orthologues of mouse PSP adapted from Collins et al (2006) 1121
L00000061 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-CONSENSUS Mouse cortex PSD consensus (ortho) 984
L00000069 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-HUMAN-PSD-FULL Human cortex biopsy PSD full list 1461
L00000071 G2C Homo sapiens BAYES-COLLINS-MOUSE-PSD-FULL Mouse cortex PSD full list (ortho) 1556
© G2C 2014. The Genes to Cognition Programme received funding from The Wellcome Trust and the EU FP7 Framework Programmes:
EUROSPIN (FP7-HEALTH-241498), SynSys (FP7-HEALTH-242167) and GENCODYS (FP7-HEALTH-241995).

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